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Lived: Palazzo di Valfonda, Via Valfonda, 9, 50123 Firenze, Italy (43.77837, 11.24866)
3 E 17th St, New York, NY 10003
Buried: Cimitero Accatolico, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy, Plot: E18L/ E12/ 1355/

James Lorimer “Lorrie” Graham, Jr. (1835-1876), American Consul in Florence, died in that city on June 30, 1876. Graham was the brother of R.M.C. Graham, President of the Metropolitan Insurance Company. He was born in New-York on January 21, 1835, but educated partly at Amiens, in France. Graham afterward lived for a time in Rio Janeiro; then, returning to New York, sailed again in the ill-fated steamer San Francisco, which foundered in a gale off Cape Hatteras. The hardship and exposure he underwent at the time left lasting physical disturbances. In 1856 he married Josephine Garner, the sister of Commodore William T. Garner. His collections of coins, autographs, drawings, and books were very interesting and valuable, and his house at 3 E. 17th St, 10003, became quite a treasury of rare articles. Some time after his return to Europe, Graham was appointed Consul-General of the United States for Italy, and took up his residence in Florence, then the capital. His spacious apartments in the Orsini Palace were always opened, with the most free and bountiful hospitality, to his countrymen, and very few who visited Florence escaped a welcome there.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Palazzo di Valfonda, formerly also called Gualfonda, is located in Florence at number 9 of the street with the same name. It stretches along the tracks of the Santa Maria Novella station, next to the royal palace, built on the site of what was one of the most extensive private and beautiful gardens in the city, which stretched for about 12 hectares of an area from via Valfonda to the Fortezza da Basso from one side, and up to via della Scala on the other side to lap the Orti Oricellari and the vegetable gardens of the basilica of Santa Maria Novella .
Address: Via Valfonda, 9, 50123 Firenze, Italy (43.77837, 11.24866)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 298951
Place
The palace was built by the Bartolini-Salimbeni family towards 1520, probably by the architect already used for another family palace in Via Tornabuoni, Baccio d'Agnolo. However, also other prominent artists, such as Benedetto da Rovezzano, Andrea Sansovino and Giovanni della Robbia, who endowed the house of a remarkable sculptural kit, contributed to the embellishment of the palace. In 1558 the building was bought by Chiappino Vitelli Il Giovane, mercenary, appointed head of the Tuscan militia by Cosimo I de' Medici. Later, the palace passed to the wealthy banking family of Germanic origin of Riccardi, who had the palace renovated and expanded by Gherardo Silvani. The Riccardi were great patrons and collectors of antiques and rare books and when in 1659 they bought the Palazzo Medici in Via Larga, they brought with them all their prestigious collections. In the early XIX century the building was purchased by a Strozzi-Ridolfi and then by Giuntini. By mid-century the beautiful garden was expropriated and destroyed to make room for the new station Maria Antonia and its annexes. In the late thirties of the XX century, the villa was purchased by the Unione degli Industriali, who renovated and expanded some parts of the building by the architect Gherardo Bosio. Since WWII the palace is the headquarters of Confindustria Firenze.
Life
Who: J. Lorimer Graham, Jr. (1869-April 29, 1876)
James Lorimer Graham, Jr., aka “Lorrie” Graham was born in New York City in 1831. He was educated in New York until the age of sixteen at which point he was sent to Amiens, France to complete his education. He lived there for a time with a cousin while pursuing his studies but would ultimately travel to Paris to complete his education. During his sojourn abroad he became a proficient French scholar and retained his fluency and perfect accent all his life. As such, he was often mistaken for a Frenchman. In terms of family, all that is known is that he married Josephine, a prominent New York merchant’s daughter, at an early age. Graham is said to have loved the literature and art of France and England as much as those of his own country. His love of literature and the arts led to jobs as a librarian and as the editor of Putnam's Magazine, a monthly periodical featuring American literature and articles on science, art, and politics. Graham served in Florence first as U.S. Consul General, then as U.S. Consul until his death in 1876.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The English Cemetery in Florence, Italy is at Piazzale Donatello. Its names, 'Cimitero Inglese' and 'Cimitero Protestante' are somewhat misleading, as the cemetery holds bodies of Orthodox Christians as well as those of many Reformed Churches; but the majority of those buried here were of the Anglophone British and American communities of Florence.
Address: Piazzale Donatello, 38, 50132 Firenze, Italy (43.77716, 11.26858)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 582608
Place
Before 1827 non-Catholics and non-Jews who died in Florence could be buried in Livorno only. In 1827 the Swiss Evangelical Reformed Church bought land outside the medieval wall and gate of Porta a' Pinti at Florence from Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany for an international and ecumenical cemetery, Russian and Greek Orthodox burials joining the Protestant ones. Carlo Reishammer, a young architectural student, landscaped the cemetery, then Giuseppe Poggi shaped it as its present oval when Florence became capital of Italy. He surrounded it with studios for artists, including that of Michele Gordigiani (who painted the portraits of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, now in the National Portrait Gallery, London). Many famous people are buried in the graveyard like Elizabeth Barrett Browning (in a tomb designed by Frederic, Lord Leighton); her son Pen Browning is buried at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori. Florence has always been a place were queer people from all over the world came due to its acceptance, wherelse in other countries was impossible to live. We cannot say if the following were really all queer couples, or maybe just special friends, the fact is that some of them chose to be buried near to each other.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Acattolico:
• Emilia Sophia Macpherson Abadam Adams (1776-1831) was the grandmother of both Alice Abadam, the suffragette, and Vernon Lee (aka Violet Page), the writer.
• Charles Bankhead, M.D. (1768-1859), George IV's Physician Extraordinary, he was the physician in attendance at Castlereagh's suicide.
• Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden (1816 or 1817–1873) was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence. Some of the surviving letters to Blagden from Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning are demonstrably affectionate. (Unfortunately Blagden's letters to them have not survived.) "Isa, perfect in companionship, as in other things," Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote of her. In one letter to Isa in the summer of 1859, she wrote: "My ever dearest, kindest Isa, I can't let another day go without writing just a word to say that I am alive enough to love you." In another from Paris a year earlier, Elizabeth Barrett Browning states that they had arrived "having lost nothing – neither a carpet-bag nor a bit of our true love for you."
• Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), died in her husband's arms. Robert Browning said that she died "smilingly, happily, and with a face like a girl's.... Her last word was... ''Beautiful". "On Monday July 1 the shops in the area around Casa Guidi were closed, while Elizabeth was mourned with unusual demonstrations." The nature of her illness is still unclear. Some modern scientists speculate her illness may have been hypokalemic periodic paralysis, a genetic disorder that causes weakness and many of the other symptoms she described.
• George Frederic Waihinger (1800-1867), German, was the beloved head waiter/butler to the Prince Demidoff of San Donato. Count Anatoly or Anatoli (called Anatole) Nikolaievich Demidov, 1st Prince of San Donato (1813–1870), was a Russian industrialist, diplomat and arts patron of the Demidov family.
• William Edgeworth (1832-1833), a one-year-old child unlisted in the Peerage though his two siblings Antonio Eroles and Francis Ysidro are. His mother is the Spanish Mariquita Eroles' sister, Rosa Florentina Eroles Edgeworth. His aunt is Maria Edgeworth, the great Irish novelist. He is buried in same plot with David (1807-1833) and Mary Reid (1833-1833), first husband and daughter of Mariquita Eroles, and Rev. Robert John Tennant (1809-1842), second husband of Mariquita. Mariquita Dorotea Francesca Tennant, née Eroles (1811–1860), is known as a social reformer. She is commemorated for helping the impoverished women of Windsor.
• Mary Farhill (1784-1854), small, clever, generous and eccentric, she was ennobled in Fiesole's Order of St Stephen. Farhill was found drowned in her bath at 70 years old. Though in Florence they thought she had no family when she died at the Villa il Palmerino, her brother Edward Farhill carefully arranged her burial in both English and Italian in a grand tomb. The Morning Post noted she willed her villa to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Maria Antonia. In the 1870s it came into the possession of the Earl of Belcarres and Crawford, Lord Lindsay. Dumas and Queen Victoria were guests under its roof. It later became Vernon Lee's residence.
• Harriet Theodosia Fisher, nee Garrow (1811-1848), half-sister of Theodosia Trollope, is buried with their maid, Elizabeth Shinner (1811-1852).
• James Lorimer "Lorrie" Graham, Jr (1831-1876), American Maecenas, married, gay, founded Graham's Magazine, had wealth, was shipwrecked and injured, appointed American Consul in Florence by President Grant, occupied the Palazzo di Valfonda, Claire Claremont (Mary Shelley's stepsister, who bore Lord Byron the child Allegra), lodging with him, and he collected autographs, books, paintings which he willed to the Century Association, New York, which sold them at auction.
• Hadrian Marryat (1845-1873). His maternal grandfather was General Lord Robert Edward Henry Somerset of Badminton House and his grandmother, Lady Louisa Augusta Courtenay, daughter of William Courtenay, 8th Earl of Devon, of Powderham Castle. The three Marryat children were painted in 1851-2 in Rome by the young Frederick Leighton.
• Clara Anastasia Novello (1818-1908), was an acclaimed soprano, the fourth daughter of Vincent Novello, a musician and music publisher, and his wife, Mary Sabilla Hehl. In 1843 she married Count Gigliucci, and retired in 1861. Clara Novello Davies (1861-1943), a well-known Welsh singer, teacher and conductor was named after Clara Novello. She married David Davies, a solicitor's clerk with the same surname as her own- Their son, David Ivor Davies, became better known as Ivor Novello, the actor, composer, dramatist and director.
• Eugene Polyakov (1943-1996), a Russian-trained balletmaster who was Rudolf Nureyev's chief assistant when Nureyev was director of the Paris Opera Ballet in the 1980's. Polyakov was born in Moscow and trained at the Bolshoi Ballet before leaving Russia for Venice in 1976. He formed his own troupe, Viva la Danza, there in 1977 and was the dance director of the Teatro Comunale in Florence from 1978 to 1983, when Nureyev appointed him balletmaster. Polyakov worked again in Florence from 1992 to 1995, when he returned to the Paris Opera Ballet. He died in Paris, but asked to be buried in Florence.
• Elena Raffalovich Comparetti (1842-1918) was an educator , intellectual and froebeliana Russian. She was the third daughter of Leo Raffalovich (1813-1879), wealthy jew landowner, and Rosette (Rosa) Mondel Loevensohn (1807-1895). The family moved to Paris. The older sister Maria Raffalovich, married to their uncle Hermann, is the mother of Marc André Raffalovich and great friend of Claude Bernard.
• William Reader of Banghurst House, Hampshire (1787-1846). His original tombstone identifies Henry Austin as his faithful servant; Austin died in Florence on July 5, 1859, age 40,
• The tomb of Mary Anne Salisbury (1798-1848) was placed by the Catholic wife of the last descendant of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Rosina, beneath a great yew tree at the entrance of the English Cemetery. It was tradition to have two yew trees, poisonous to cattle but essential for the English long bow of Agincourt in English graveyards, which also symbolize the Jachin and Boaz columns of the Jerusalem Temple. Only one yew tree remains and a falling branch from it destroyed this tomb, now replaced by the Rotary Club, 23/4/2012. The busts of Count Cosimo Buonarroti and Rosina which grace the Michelangelo museum at the Casa Buonarroti were sculpted by Aristodemo Costoli.
• James Bansfield’s tomb and that of King William IV's son's wife, Lady Georgina Hacking Hamilton Sewell, lie on either side of the king's natural son, Sir William Henry Sewell, each being apparently equal to Sir William. “Known as a servant above a servant a brother beloved. James died January 11, 1862. He was for 20 years the faithful and devoted servant of General Sir W.H. Sewell, K.C.B. by whose widow this tomb was raised.”
• Eleanore Emilie Contessa Stenbock-Fermor (1815-1859) was the daughter of Count Magnus Stenbock-Fermor, Russian Colonel. Her Oxford-educated PreRaphaelite poet nephew was Eric Stenbock.
• Theodosia Trollope, born Theodosia Garrow (1816–1865) was an English poet, translator, and writer known also for her marriage into the Trollope family. She married and bought a villa in Florence, Italy with her husband, Thomas Adolphus Trollope. Her hospitality made her home the centre of British society in the city. Her writings in support of the Italian nationalists are credited with changing public opinions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4979473.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
James Andrew Beard was an American cookbook author, teacher, syndicated columnist and television personality. Beard was a champion of American cuisine who taught and mentored generations of professional chefs and food enthusiasts.
Born: May 5, 1903, Portland, Oregon, United States
Died: January 21, 1985, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Reed College
Lived: James Beard Foundation, 167 W 12th St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.73709, -73.99985)
498 E St, Gearhart, OR 97138
Buried: over the beach in Gearhart, Oregon where he spent his summers as a child (ashes)
TV shows: I Love to Eat

The James Beard Foundation is a New York City-based national non-profit culinary arts organization named in honor of James Beard, a prolific food writer, teacher, and cookbook author, who was also known as the "Dean of American Cookery."
Address: 167 W 12th St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.73709, -73.99985)
Type: Adminstrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-675-4984
Place
The Foundation’s mission is to celebrate, nurture, and honor America’s diverse culinary heritage through programs that educate and inspire. The programs run the gamut from elegant guest-chef dinners to scholarships for aspiring culinary students, educational conferences, and industry awards. In the spirit of James Beard’s legacy, the Foundation not only creates programs that help educate people about American cuisine, but also support and promote the chefs and other industry professionals who are behind it. The Foundation was started in 1986 by Peter Kump, a former student of James Beard and founder of the Institute of Culinary Education. At Julia Child’s suggestion, Kump purchased Beard’s New York brownstone at 167 West 12th Street in Greenwich Village and preserved it as a gathering place where the general public and press alike are able to appreciate the talents of established and emerging chefs. The first such dinner was at the suggestion of Wolfgang Puck in 1987. Puck cooked a dinner to raise money and Kump later established it into a monthly event.
Life
Who: James Andrew Beard (May 5, 1903 – January 21, 1985)
James Beard was a cookbook author, teacher, syndicated columnist and television personality. Beard was a champion of American cuisine who taught and mentored generations of professional chefs and food enthusiasts. His legacy lives on in twenty books, other writings and his foundation’s annual James Beard awards in a number of culinary genres. Julia Child summed up Beard’s personal life: “Beard was the quintessential American cook. Well-educated and well-traveled during his eighty-two years, he was familiar with many cuisines but he remained fundamentally American. He was a big man, over six feet tall, with a big belly, and huge hands. An endearing and always lively teacher, he loved people, loved his work, loved gossip, loved to eat, loved a good time.” As a life-long bachelor, James Beard was homosexual. According to Beard’s memoir, "By the time I was seven, I knew that I was gay. I think it’s time to talk about that now." Beard also admitted of having "until I was about forty-five, I guess a really violent temper." Mark Bittman described him in a manner similar to Child’s description: "In a time when serious cooking meant French Cooking, Beard was quintessentially American, a Westerner whose mother ran a boardinghouse, a man who grew up with hotcakes and salmon and meatloaf in his blood. A man who was born a hundred years ago on the other side of the country, in a city, Portland, that at the time was every bit as cosmopolitan as, say, Allegheny, Pennsylvania." James Beard died of heart failure on January 21, 1985 at his home in New York City at age 81. He was cremated and his ashes scattered over the beach in Gearhart, Oregon, where he spent summers as a child.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

James Beard was born in Portland, Oregon in 1903 to Elizabeth and John Beard. His mother operated the Gladstone Hotel, and his father worked at the city's customs house. The family vacationed on the Pacific coast in Gearhart, Oregon, where Beard was exposed to Pacific Northwest cuisine. After spending many summers in Gearhart, Beard and his mother bought the smallest house in the seaside village, a cottage built in 1922 (498 E St, Gearhart, OR 97138). Restored to its original character, this charming cottage is located close to the beach on a large lot in West Gearhart. Beautifully landscaped, there is a garden/tool shed and playhouse included. Last sold in April 2012 for 327,500$. James Beard died of heart failure on January 21, 1985 at his home in New York City at age 81. He was cremated and his ashes scattered over the beach in Gearhart, Oregon. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4979333.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Duncan James Corrowr Grant was a British painter and designer of textiles, pottery, theatre sets and costumes. He was a member of the Bloomsbury Group.
Born: January 21, 1885, Aviemore, United Kingdom
Died: May 8, 1978, Aldermaston, United Kingdom
Education: Westminster School of Art
Lived: Wissett Lodge, Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Charleston Farmhouse, West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Hilton Hall, High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
24 Victoria Square, SW1W
26a Canonbury Square, N1
19 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
22 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
26 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
8 Fitzroy Street, W1T
28 Percy Street, W1T
1 Taviton Street, WC1H
143 Fellows Road, NW3
Doune of Rothiemurchus, The Polchar, Aviemore PH22, UK (57.1649, -3.83368)
45 Quai de Bourbon, Ile-St.-Louis, Paris
3 Park Square West, NW1
Buried: St Peter, The Street, West Firle, East Sussex, BN8 6LP
Books: Private

John Maynard Keynes, Baron Keynes of Tilton, was the preeminent economist of the 20th century. The artist Duncan Grant, whom he met in 1908, was one of Keynes's great loves. He was with Grant for nearly eight years and supported him financially even after they broke up. Keynes was also involved with Lytton Strachey. Keynes had won the affections of Arthur Hobhouse, as well as Grant, both times falling out with a jealous Strachey for it. Strachey had previously found himself put off by Keynes, not least because of his manner of "treat[ing] his love affairs statistically". Keynes' friends in the Bloomsbury Group were initially surprised when, in his later years, he began dating and pursuing affairs with women, demonstrating himself to be bisexual. Ray Costelloe (who would later marry Oliver Strachey) was an early heterosexual interest of Keynes. In 1906, Keynes had written of this infatuation that, "I seem to have fallen in love with Ray a little bit, but as she isn't male I haven't [been] able to think of any suitable steps to take.” In 1921, Keynes wrote that he had fallen "very much in love" with Lydia Lopokova, a well-known Russian ballerina, and one of the stars of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. In the early years of his courtship, he maintained an affair with a younger man, Sebastian Sprott, in tandem with Lopokova, but eventually chose Lopokova exclusively. They married in 1925.
Together from 1908 to 1916: 8 years.
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes (June 5, 1883 – April 21, 1946)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. A writer, he first met members of the Bloomsbury group in 1910 but was not fully accepted by them until 1914, when he became Duncan Grant's lover. Like Grant, Garnett was a conscientious objector and having worked in France in 1915 with the Friends War Victims Relief Mission, he worked as a farm laborer to avoid conscription on his return to England. Garnett moved with Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell to Charleston farmhouse in 1916. He married Grant’s daughter (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), Angelica, in 1942. He was present at her birth on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry, to the horror of her parents.
Together from 1914 to 1921: 7 years.
David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Duncan Grant was a British painter and designer. He was a cousin, and for some time a lover, of Lytton Strachey. Through the Stracheys, Duncan was introduced to the Bloomsbury Group, where John Maynard Keynes became another of his lovers. Grant is best known for his painting style, which developed in the wake of French post-impressionist exhibitions mounted in London in 1910. He often worked with, and was influenced by, another member of the group, art critic and artist Roger Fry. Grant was in a relationship with Vanessa Bell and is the father of her daughter, Angelica. Duncan had many serious relationships with men, most notably David Garnett, who will marry his daughter. In Grant's later years, the poet Paul Roche, whom he had known since 1946, took care of him and enabled Grant to maintain his way of life. Roche was a British poet, novelist, and professor of English. Roche returned to England from New York to be with Grant after Bell's death, eventually joined by his entire family. Clarissa Tanner, Roche’s wife, came to accept Grant's role in Roche's life, although sexual relations between Roche and Grant cooled off out of respect for Tanner. Roche was devastated by Grant’s death at the age of 93.
Together from 1946 to 1978: 32 years.
Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
Donald Robert Paul Roche (September 26, 1916 - October 30, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Doune of Rothiemurchus, two miles south of Aviemore in Strathspey is an XVII-century mansion which replaced an earlier castle. The lands were held by the Shaws, Mackintoshes and by the Dallases of Cantray. James Shaw of Rothiemurchus was killed at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411.
Address: The Polchar, Aviemore PH22, UK (57.1649, -3.83368)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Historic Scotland Building ID: 253 (Grade B, 1978)
Place
An elegant country house, the home of the Grants of Rothiemurchus for centuries. The Doune stands beside an ancient motte, or hill fort (Doune comes from 'dun' for a fortified place). The house dates to the XVI century, and was probably built by the Shaw family. The house was extended in the 1780s and again in 1803 when the Georgian frontage was added. For a time in the 1930s the house was operated as a hotel, and it was used by the army as a base during WWII. After the war the house was abandonned, and by 1975 it was derelict and in danger of being lost forever. An ambitious programme of ongoing restoration work has restored it to something approaching its former glory. Doune of Rothiemurchus was the home of Elizabeth Grant, who wrote her “Memoires of a Highland Lady” here. Visitors can explore the Doune as part of a themed “Highland Lady Safari,” or a Rothiemurchus Experience Safari Land Rover tour. The Doune is set in the midst of a glorious outdoor estate, with a location on the edge of Britain's winter playground; the Cairngorms National Park. The estate offers superb scenery and a huge variety of outdoor recreational activities.
Life
Who: Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
Duncan Grant was a British painter and designer of textiles, pottery, theatre sets and costumes. He was a member of the Bloomsbury Group.He was a grandson of Sir John Peter Grant, 12th Laird of Rothiemurchus, KCB, GCMG, sometime Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal. Grant was also the first cousin twice removed of John Grant, 13th Earl of Dysart (b. 1946). Grant was born on January 21, 1885 to Major Bartle Grant, a "poverty-stricken" major in the army, and Ethel McNeil in Rothiemurchus, Aviemore, Scotland. Between 1887-94 the family lived in India and Burma, returning to England every two years. During this period Grant was educated by his governess, Alice Bates. Along with Rupert Brooke, Grant attended Hillbrow School, Rugby (between 1894–99). During this period, Grant would spend his school holidays at Hogarth House, Chiswick with his grandmother, Lady Grant. He attended St Paul's School, London (as a boarder for two terms) between 1899-91 where he was awarded several art prizes. Between 1899/1900-1906, Grant lived with his aunt and uncle, Sir Richard and Lady Strachey and their children. Lady Strachey was able to persuade Grant's parents that he should be allowed to pursue an education in art. In 1902 Grant was enrolled by his aunt at Westminster School of Art; he attended for the next three years. While at Westminster, Grant was encouraged in his studies by Simon Bussy, a French painter and lifelong friend of Matisse, who went on to marry Dorothy Strachey.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Back in London in 1905, Duncan Grant lived again with his parents at 143 Fellows Road, NW3 on the lower slopes of Hampstead. The Stracheys were nearby, having moved in June to 67 Belsize Park Gardens.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 33 Fitzroy Square, Roger Fry (1866–1934), “In this house Roger Fry 1866–1934 Artist and Art Critic ran the Omega Workshops 1913–1919"
Address: Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Fitzroy Square is one of the Georgian squares in London and is the only one found in the central London area known as Fitzrovia. The square, nearby Fitzroy Street, and the Fitzroy Tavern in Charlotte Street have the family name of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, into whose ownership the land passed through his marriage. His descendant Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton developed the area during the late XVIII and early XIX century. Fitzroy Square was a speculative development intended to provide London residences for aristocratic families, and was built in four stages. Leases for the eastern and southern sides, designed by Robert Adam, were granted in 1792; building began in 1794 and was completed in 1798 by Adam’s brothers James and William. These buildings are fronted in Portland stone brought by sea from Dorset. The Napoleonic Wars and a slump in the London property market brought a temporary stop to construction of the square after the south and east sides were completed. According to the records of the Squares Frontagers’ Committee, 1815 residents looked out on “vacant ground, the resort of the idle and profligate.” Another contemporary account describes the incomplete square: “The houses are faced with stone, and have a greater proportion of architectural excellence and embellishment than most others in the metropolis. They were designed by the Adams, but the progress of the late war prevented the completion of the design. It is much to be regretted, that it remains in its present unfinished state.” The northern and western sides were subsequently constructed in 1827-1829 and 1832-1835 respectively, and are stucco-fronted. The south side suffered bomb damage during WWII and was rebuilt with traditional facades to remain in keeping with the rest of the square.
Notable queer residents at Fitzroy Square:
• No. 8, W1T was the home of the painter James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903.)
• No. 19, W1T was the base for the “International School” run by Louise Michel in the 1890s. Later, from 1909 to 1911, was the home of Bloomsbury Group artist Duncan Grant (1885-1978.)
• No. 21, W1T was Roger Fry (December 14, 1866 –September 9, 1934)’s studio
• No. 22, W1T was Duncan Grant’s studio.
• No. 26, W1T Duncan Grant and John Maynard Keynes shared a flat.
• Engligh Heritage Blue Plaque: 29 Fitzroy Square, W1T Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (1882–1941), "Novelist and Critic lived here 1907–1911" Also George Bernard Shaw lived here from 1887 until his marriage in 1898.
• No. 33, W1T housed Roger Fry (1866-1934)’s Omega Workshop, creating avant-garde furniture from 1913 to 1919.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Charleston, in East Sussex is a property associated with the Bloomsbury group, that is open to the public.
Address: West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1323 811265
English Heritage Building ID: 292908 (Grade II, 1965)
Place
The interior of the XVIII century farmhouse contains an important series of mural and furniture decorations painted between 1916-1939 by Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell. Charleston was the country home of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant and is an example of their decorative style within a domestic context, representing the fruition of over sixty years of artistic creativity. Vanessa Bell wrote of this time; "It will be an odd life, but ... it ought to be a good one for painting." In addition to the house and artists’ garden, there is an exhibition gallery showing a mix of contemporary and historical shows of fine and decorative art, a Crafts Council selected shop selling applied art and books relating to Bloomsbury, a small tea room and a video presentation. Charleston hosts a number of special events throughout the year, most notably the Charleston Festival which is centred on talks and drama relating to literary, artistic and Bloomsbury themes. The house is located in the village of Firle, in the Lewes District of East Sussex. As you enter the street in Firle village, continue up the street after the Ram Inn and you will see Little Talland House on the left, opposite the village hall. Little Talland House was rented by Virginia Woolf from January 1911 to January 1912. “I'm very much excited - furnishing my cottage, and staining the floors the colours of the Atlantic in a storm.” (Virginia Woolf, Letters, no. 552) “I've got to go down [to Firle] and make curtains and move beds at the cottage, having been so rash as to ask 5 people to stay the week after. Nessa is bringing a sewing machine; and in the intervals, I shall spur her to bouts of talk.” (Letters, no. 553) “I spent yesterday finishing off the cottage. Its right underneath the downs, and though itself an eyesore, still that dont matter when one's inside. I have one gooseberry bush; 3 mongrels, thought by some to grow currants. Shall you ever come and stay there? There is a Bath, and a W. C.” (Letters, no. 554, to Violet Dickinson) “The villa is inconceivably ugly, done up in patches of post-impressionist colour.” (Letters, no. 561). The graves of Vanessa and Quentin Bell and Duncan Grant are quite close to the wall on the North side of the churchyard at St Peter (The Street, West Firle, East Sussex, BN8 6LP).
Life
Who: Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 –April 7, 1961)
In 1916 the artists Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant moved to Sussex with their unconventional household when Grant, under the terms of his exemption from military service, was employed at a nearby farm together with David Garnett (1892-1981.) Over the following half century Charleston became the country meeting place for the group of artists, writers and intellectuals known as Bloomsbury. Garnett, Clive Bell and John Maynard Keynes lived at Charleston for considerable periods; Virginia and Leonard Woolf, E. M. Forster, Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry were frequent visitors. Inspired by Italian fresco painting and the Post-Impressionists, the artists decorated the walls, doors and furniture at Charleston. The walled garden was redesigned in a style reminiscent of southern Europe, with mosaics, box hedges, gravel pathways and ponds, but with a touch of Bloomsbury humour in the placing of the statuary. "It’s most lovely, very solid and simple, with ... perfectly flat windows and wonderful tiled roofs. The pond is most beautiful, with a willow at one side and a stone or flint wall edging it all round the garden part, and a little lawn sloping down to it, with formal bushes on it." — Vanessa Bell. The rooms on show form a complete example of the decorative art of the Bloomsbury artists: murals, painted furniture, ceramics, objects from the Omega Workshops, paintings and textiles. The collection includes work by Auguste Renoir, Picasso, Derain, Matthew Smith, Sickert, Stephen Tomlin (1901-1937) and Eugène Delacroix.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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"Vanessa Bell, who had fallen in love with Duncan Grant before the start of the war, was painting in a farm-cottage on the Sussex coast, living in an uneasy triangle with Duncan and his new lover, David (known as Bunny) Garnett. In 1918 Bell gave birth to Grant’s child, Angelica Bell.” Hermione Lee, “Virginia Woolf” (1996)
Address: Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 01986 873173
Place
Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200, measured at 268 in the 2011 Census. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with two carucates of free land, twelve monks, and a chapel in the village. The XI century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the XII Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa’s sister) said after visiting them: "Wissett seems to lull asleep all ambition. Don’t you think they have discovered the secret of life? I thought it wonderfully harmonious." Wissett Hall is a red brick manor house owned by Colin Holmes, co-founder of Dencora PLC. The village pub is the Plough Inn. Wissett Wines are produced at the Valley Farm Vineyards by Elaine Heeler and Vanessa Tucker, who brought the business in 2014, Wissett Wines was established in 1987.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981), Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 – April 7, 1961)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. He was the son of Constance Clara Garnett (née Black), an English translator of XIX-century Russian literature, one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov who introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public, and Edward William Garnett, an English writer, critic and a significant and personally generous literary editor, who was instrumental in getting D. H. Lawrence's “Sons and Lovers” published. As a child, David had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny,” by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. His first wife was illustrator Rachel "Ray" Marshall (1891–1940), sister of translator and diarist Frances Partridge. He and Ray, whose woodcuts appear in some of his books, had two sons, one of whom (Richard) went to Beacon Hill School. Ray died relatively young of breast cancer. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. He was present at the birth of Grant’s daughter, Angelica (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?.” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry (on May 8, 1942), to the horror of her parents.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The house at 45 Quai de Bourbon, on the Ile-St.-Louis, was owned by Prince Antoine Bibesco (who died in 1951). Mina Curtiss, editor of the letters of Marcel Proust, describes it as “the most heavenly house on the prow of the Ile-St.-Louis, with a view of both sides of the Seine… with a room so beautiful it took my breath away – full length Vuillard panels obviously painted to fit on the walls… a princely residence… all elegant, ancient stone…” Duncan Grant stayed here in 1920.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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From 1920 to 1940 Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell had their studio at 8 Fitzroy Street, W1T. “The Armchair, 8 Fitzroy Street” by Duncan Grant, 1925, originally in the Collection of H. Trevor Williams, from whom the paiting was purchased by the Leicester Galleries, and subsequently purchased by the Ministry of Works in Dec. 1958, now hangs at Downing Street. The studio was destroyed by a bombing during WWII.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1922 David Garnett published the highly successful novel, “Lady Into Fox.” The money he made from this book enabled him to buy Hilton Hall, an early XVII century house near Huntingdon.
Address: High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 54022 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Described as “The most beautiful of all the Bloomsbury houses” by biographer, critic and art historian Frances Spalding, Hilton Hall was bought by David Garnett Fox in 1924. There he entertained many literary friends: T.E. Lawrence would startle the village by roaring up unannounced on his motorbike; Virginia Woolf came and amused his boys by pretending to be a wolf. D.H. Lawrence teased him for living in a Hall, but added: “It’s not at all grand, except in the way a grandmother is grand, by being ancient.” Hilton Hall was built early in the XVII century perhaps by Robert Walpole, (a very distant relative of the prime minister) who died there in 1699 and is buried in Hilton Church. It was refronted and given new sash windows and panelling in the middle of the XVIII century but the fine Jacobean staircase, wide floorboards and moulded beams all remain. Otherwise it has been very little altered except by an extension containing panelling and a bay window salvaged from the ruins of Old Park Farm in Hilton. Behind the house there is a large dovehouse, also of the XVII century, which was used by Garnett’s second wife, Angelica, as a studio. She was the daughter of the Bloomsbury artists Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, and was herself a noted artist. She has left her mark on the house with a decorated bedroom mantelpiece, a large mural in the dovehouse and a mosaic doorstep. Because of its place in the history of the Bloomsbury Group, and its collection of paintings and sculpture – especially by Angelica’s parents, it has been a popular destination for groups from the Cambridge branch of the Art Fund and the Friends of Kettle Yard. The grounds are all enclosed by hedging and fencing. Swimming pool, kitchen garden.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
The Garnetts lived at Hilton Hall, Hilton near St Ives in Cambridgeshire, where David Garnett kept a herd of Jersey cows. They had four daughters: in order, Amaryllis, Henrietta, and twins Nerissa and Frances; eventually the couple separated. Amaryllis Garnett (1943–1973) was an actress who had a small part in Harold Pinter’s film adaptation of “The Go-Between” (1970.) She drowned in the Thames, aged 29. Henrietta Garnett married Lytton Burgo Partridge, her father’s nephew by his first wife Ray, but was left a widow with a newborn infant when she was 18; she oversaw the legacies of both David Garnett and Duncan Grant. Nerissa Garnett (1946–2004) was an artist, ceramicist, and photographer. Fanny (Frances) Garnett moved to France where she became a farmer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Soon after Duncan Grant and Paul Roche’s initial meeting in 1946, Roche moved into the flat owned by Marjorie Strachey (sister of Lytton Strachey) at 1 Taviton Street, WC1H where Grant had the use of a room for three days a week. Although still serving as a priest at St Mary’s, Cadogan Gardens, Roche often wore a sailor suit (a habit begun during the War) to meet Grant at Victoria Station.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 145 North End Road, Golders Green, Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) "Writer lived here"
Address: Canonbury Square, London N1 2AL, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Canonbury is a residential district in the London Borough of Islington in the north of London. It is roughly in the area between Essex Road, Upper Street and Cross Street and either side of St Paul’s Road. In 1253 land in the area was granted to the Canons of St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield and became known as Canonbury. The area continued predominantly as open land until it was developed as a suburb in the early XIX century. In common with similar inner London areas, it suffered decline when the construction of railways in the 1860s enabled commuting into the city from further afield. The gentrification of the area from the 1950s included new developments to replace war-damaged properties in Canonbury Park North and South as well as restoration of older buildings. East Canonbury is the south-eastern corner of the district, bordering on the Regents Canal. Parts of this area were transferred to the district from the London Borough of Hackney in a boundary adjustment (along the line of the northern tow-path of the canal), in 1993. In the east is the New River Estate (formerly the Marquess Estate), a 1,200 dwelling council estate, completed in 1976 on 26 acres (110,000 m2), and designed by Darbourne & Darke. A dark red brick, traffic free estate, it was praised as an example of municipal architecture, but acquired a bad reputation and has since been extensively redeveloped to improve security for residents. Canonbury Square is an attractive square, developed between 1805 and 1830, it includes a variety of distinct styles. In 1812, when few properties had been built, the New North Road turnpike, now known as Canonbury Road, was constructed and bisects the square. Many significant figures from the arts and literary worlds have lived on the square, including George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh and Samuel Phelps.
Notable queer residents at Canonbury Square:
• Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626), King James I’s Lord Chancellor, lived in Canonbury Tower, N1 1616-1626
• Evelyn Waugh (October 28, 1903- April 10, 1966), writer, lived at 17a Canonbury Square, N1; he left after a couple of years in 1930, claiming he was tired of having to explain to friends why he was livng in so appalling a district. Waugh lived also at 145 North End Road (London, W14)
• Duncan Grant (1885-1978) and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), painters and designers, lived at 26a Canonbury Square, N1 from 1949 to 1955.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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28 Percy Street, W1T was the London base for Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant from 1955 to 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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From 1961 to 1970 Duncan Grant stayed at 24 Victoria Square, SW1W. Grant moved here soon after Vanessa Bell’s death, and Paul Roche found him sitting among his unsorted belongings and furniture there in a state of emotional collapse, unable to focus on the mess. “I think it’s simpler just to die,” he told Paul. Clarissa Roche helped brighten his rooms by renewing curtains and covers.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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3 Park Square West, NW1, is part of John Nash's grand scheme for Regent's Park as a setting for the Regent's own palace (never built). It was home of Professor Patrick Trevor-Roper, eminent eye surgeon, from the 1960s to his death in 2004. Trevor-Roper was one of only three witnesses to the Wolfenden Committee on Homosexual Law Reform to identify themselves as gay men - a powerful demonstration of the legal and social pressure on gay men to remain discrete about their sexuality in the early 1960s. Trevor-Roper was committed to homosexual law reform throughout his life. Patrician in his manner, he had many liberal and bohemian friends as well as establishment connections. 3 Park Square West was the venue for the first meeting of the founders of the Terrence Higgins Trust. From 1970, gay artist Duncan Grant spent the last fifteen years of his life as a lodger, living and working in the basement areas of the house and often audible throughout the building due to his love of playing very loud rock music. Led Zeppelin was one of his favourites. Trevor-Roper furnished the house in Regency taste and was a long-standing campaigner - ultimately successful - against the opticians dispensing monopoly of spectacles. He also supported conservationists battles against the destruction by developers of historic areas of London; the house was the initial office of both the Spitalfields Trust and Twentieth Century Society.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cristóbal Balenciaga Eizaguirre was a Spanish Basque fashion designer and the founder of the Balenciaga fashion house.
Born: January 21, 1895, Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain
Died: March 23, 1972, Xàbia, Spain
Lived: Cristobal Balenciaga Museum, Aldamar Parkea, 6, 20808 Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain (43.30188, -2.20494)
Buried: Cementerio de Getaria (Getaria), San Sebastian, Provincia de Guipuzcoa, País Vasco, Spain
Label: Balenciaga
Other name: Cristobal Balentziaga Eizagirre (Basque)
Parents: Martina Eizaguirre Embil, José Balenciaga Basurto
Organization founded: Balenciaga

The Balenciaga Museum is located in Getaria, just 25Km from San Sebastian, and makes an ideal daytrip from Guipuzcoa’s capital. Whilst the museum is well worth a visit in itself, Getaria is also one of the prettiest coastal towns in the region.
Address: Aldamar Parkea, 6, 20808 Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain (43.30188, -2.20494)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +34 943 00 88 40
Place
The Balenciaga Museum (Cristobal Balenciaga museoa) opened on June 7th 2011. Getaria was chosen as it is the birthplace of the renowned designer, and the museum became the first in the world to be dedicated entirely to the work of a fashion designer. The museum is housed in a building connected to the Aldamar Palace, the former residence of the Marquis and Marquise of Casa Torre, grandparents of Queen Fabiola of Belgium and mentors to Balenciaga in his early days. The building consists of four floors divided into three large spaces and six halls. One section of the museum showcases a rotating selection of the designer’s pieces, some of which are part of the Balenciaga Foundation’s own Collection, as well as others belonging to private individuals. In addition to this, the museum plays host to various temporary exhibitions and leisure activities. The building itself is also well worth seeing for its interesting combination of tradition and modernity in a single structure.
Life
Who: Cristóbal Balenciaga Eizaguirre (January 21, 1895 – March 23, 1972)
Cristóbal Balenciaga was a Spanish Basque fashion designer and the founder of the Balenciaga fashion house. He had a reputation as a couturier of uncompromising standards and was referred to as "the master of us all" by Christian Dior and as "the only couturier in the truest sense of the word" by Coco Chanel, who continued "The others are simply fashion designers". He continues to be revered as the supreme deity of the European salons. On the day of his death, in 1972, Women's Wear Daily ran the headline "The king is dead" (no one in the fashion world had any doubt as to whom it referred). Balenciaga was born in Getaria, a fishing town in the Basque province of Gipuzkoa, on January 21, 1895. His mother was a seamstress, and as a child Balenciaga often spent time with her as she worked. At the age of twelve, he began work as the apprentice of a tailor. When Balenciaga was a teenager, the Marchioness de Casa Torres, the foremost noblewoman in his town, became his customer and patron. She sent him to Madrid, where he was formally trained in tailoring. Balenciaga was homosexual, although he kept his sexuality private throughout his life. The love of his life and long time partner was Franco-Russian milliner Vladzio Zawrorowski d'Attainville, who he met in the 1920s and had helped fund setting him up. When d'Attainville died in 1948, Balenciaga was so broken he almost considered closing the business. In 1960 he made the wedding dress for Fabiola de Mora y Aragón when she married king Baudouin I of Belgium. The Queen later donated her wedding dress to the Cristóbal Balenciaga Foundation. On 7 June 2011, the Balenciaga Museum was inaugurated in his hometown of Getaria by Queen Sofía of Spain and with the presence of Hubert de Givenchy, honorific president of the Balenciaga Foundation. The museum has a collection of more than 1,200 pieces designed by Balenciaga, part of them donations by disciples like Givenchy or clients, like Queen Fabiola of Belgium and the heirs of Grace Kelly. Balenciaga is buried at Cementerio de Getaria, San Sebastian.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Christian Dior was a French fashion designer, best known as the founder of one of the world's top fashion houses, also called Christian Dior, which is now owned by Groupe Arnault.
Born: January 21, 1905, Granville, France
Died: October 23, 1957, Montecatini Terme
Education: Sciences Po
Lived: 220, Route Départementale 562, 83440 Montauroux, France (43.59805, 6.78831)
Buried: Cimetière de Callian, Callian, Departement du Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Siblings: Catherine Dior, Raymond Dior, Jacqueline Dior, Bernard Dior
Parents: Maurice Dior, Isabelle Cardamone

Christian Dior’s love for this land was born in the 1930s, when his family, ruined by the stock market crash, had to leave Normandy to take refuge in the South. Dior’s father acquired a modest home, Les Nayssées, in Callian, and it is here that his son discovered himself "peasant in the heart".
Address: 220, Route Départementale 562, 83440 Montauroux, France (43.59805, 6.78831)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +33 4 94 39 01 40
Place
The château de La Colle Noire is a residence located at the entrance of the Pays de Fayence, on the border of the Alpes-Maritimes and the Var. It is built on a promontory overlooking the plain of Montauroux. The castle is surrounded by a park with a chapel dedicated to Sainte-Anne. The ensemble dates back to the mid-XIX century and was completely redesigned by Christian Dior from 1950. It is property of Parfums Christian Dior since 2013. From the XV century to the beginning of the XIX century, the site is described in various ways: La Colle Narbonne, La Colle, La Colle Noire, logis de La Colle. However, it was from 1826 that the domain really took shape, when Henri-Emmanuel Poulle (1792-1877), lawyer, first president of the Court of Aix-en-Provence and deputy of the Var, from an old family of Montauroux, becomes owner of the "domaine de La Colle", which by extension will take the name of the neighboring hamlet to become the "domaine de La Colle Noire". Beginning in 1839, Henri-Emmanuel Poulle created a relais des Postes on the estate, the building of which would probably serve as a base for the future castle. Over time, through various acquisitions, the estate reaches an area of more than 100 hectares, becoming a vast agricultural operation, composed mainly of plowing, pastures, vines and muriers. It was in 1858, at the age of 66, that Henri-Emmanuel Poulle decided to build a residence there for his retirement. The construction will last three years, from 1858 to 1861. The facade with its two emblematic towers, dominating the valley, dates from that time. It was also during this period that Poulle had a chapel dedicated to Sainte Anne, referring to her daughter Anne-Victoire. Henri-Emmanuel Poulle also built a chapel dedicated to Saint Barthélémy in the village of Montauroux, near the parish church. Due to the loss of his title, it could not be sold as a national asset during the French Revolution and was removed from vandalism during the revolution of 1870. It passed into the patrimony of Poulle and was transmitted to Christian Dior who offered it to the commune of Montauroux in 1953. Built in 1634 by the Pénitents Blancs (White Penitents,) it still presents today a decor painted on wood of which are adorned the walls as well as the vault. At the death of Henri-Emmanuel Poulle in 1877, the property passed to his daughter, Anne-Victoire (1827-1894), married to Félix Reibaud, maître des Postes du secteur. Anne-Victoire, very pious, obtained from the Bishop of Frejus that the priest of Montauroux could say mass at the Sainte-Anne chapel on the property every Sunday except at Christmas, Easter and other feasts. The inhabitants of the neighborhood then took the habit of coming to hear Mass at La Colle Noire. The Sainte-Anne chapel is still consecrated today. On the death of Anne-Victoire in 1894, his son Paul Félix Honoré Reibaud inherited the estate of La Colle Noire. Head of office at the Ministry of Justice in Paris, he had no interest in this property. Abandoned, the property was sold to a businessman named Fayolle, whose widow resold the estate in 1921 to Pierre Grosselin. On October 25, 1950, the property, with an area of 50 hectares, made up of a noble house, agricultural buildings and land cultivated mainly in vines and flowers, was bought by Christian Dior.
Life
Who: Christian Dior (January 21, 1905 – October 24, 1957)
Christian Dior acquires the property in a region that he knew well. His father, widow since 1931, lived in the plain of Callian with his young sister Catherine, inspiration of the perfume Miss Dior. "And then Miss Dior was born. It was born from those evenings of Provence crossed by fireflies where the green jasmine serves as a counter-song to the melody of the night and the earth". It is therefore in this Provence dear to his heart, in the inaccessible Var inland that Christian Dior will develop his house, far from Paris and 30 Avenue Montaigne, home of his couture house. "It is in Montauroux, near Callian, where a good star had allowed me, fifteen years ago, to find tranquility and prepare a new existence. Of the house, I cannot say much because I'm doing it. It is simple, solid and noble, and its serenity suits the period of life that I will have to tackle in a few years. That house, I wish it to be my real home. Where - if God lends me long life - I can retire. Where - if I have the means - I can close the loop of my existence and find, under another climate, the closed garden that protected my childhood. That is where I can finally live quiet, forgetting Christian Dior to just become Christian again. It is at Montauroux that I write these last lines." It was to the Russian architect André Svétchine that Christian Dior entrusted the restoration and renovation of La Colle Noire from 1955 onwards. His friends Raymonde Zehnacker in Mougins and then Marc Chagall in Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat and in Saint-Paul-de-Vence also used the same architect, then specialized in the transformation of "rural dwellings, neither simple farms nor real castles". The stone was laid bare, the perspectives restored and enlarged, the accesses rethought with the transformation of the service wing into a main entrance. Planted with cypresses, this walkway leads to the hexagonal entrance hall, a sort of atrium designed by Christian Dior himself, where the Provençal calade floor draws a pattern of wind-colored roses, dear to his childhood in Normandy. To this facade located in the North responds the South facade, asymmetric, in the style of Provençal villa of the years 1940-50. It is reflected in a 45 meter long water mirror, also designed by Christian Dior, showing a contrast between the sinuosity of the landscape and the rigor of its straight lines. Completely redesigned, the distribution includes a large staircase with zenital lighting leading to "rooms to give" to friends of passage, a succession of reception rooms, including the large living room measuring more than 18 meters opening onto a terrace overlooking the mirror of water. Combining vintage furniture, comfort from the 1950s, references to Provence or England, "it is an art of living that Christian Dior wanted to invent at the Colle Noire", André Svétchine declared. The reception rooms and apartment of Christian Dior are furnished with eclecticism, decorated with objects of the XVIII and XIX centuries bought from antique dealers, while some rooms have the Louis XV or Louis XVI styles "among a multitude of other styles”. If Provence has inspired Christian Dior to create Miss Dior in 1947, it is the lily of the valley of the Colle Noire that is at the origin of Diorissimo, created in 1956 by Edmond Roudnitska. It is this tradition that inspired to François Demachy, perfume-creator of Parfums Christian Dior, La Col Noire, whose flowers come from the rose field in May, planted as a tribute in the park of the estate. After the death of Christian Dior on October 23, 1957, her sister Catherine inherited the estate but she cannot keep it and in 2013 the company Parfums Christian Dior bought La Colle Noire. Before this acquisition, the property belonged to the Laroche, owners of La Reserve in Beaulieu, then to Mr. and Mrs. Tassou. After an intense restoration begun in 2015, La Colle Noire was inaugurated by the Parfums Christian Dior on May 9, 2016 in the presence of Charlize Theron, regaining its vocation to welcome "the friends of the house". Christian Dior lies in a very simple tomb near his father, his housekeeper and his sister Catherine, who died in 2008, in the cemetery of Callian, near the chapel of Saint-Barthélemy.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Antonio D'Amico (born January 21, 1959)

Antonio D'Amico is a model and fashion designer. He is best known as the partner of Gianni Versace.
Born: January 21, 1959 (age 57), Mesagne

Gianni Versace’s influence and artistic vision are evident throughout the gated property, which features an opulent 10-bedroom, 11-bathroom Mediterranean villa decorated with hand-painted walls and ceiling frescos.
Address: 1116 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, FL 33139, USA (25.7819, -80.13044)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 786-485-2200
Place
Built in 1930
The house was built in Mediterranean Revival style, commissioned by architect Alden Freeman. There is a rumour that during construction a time capsule was hidden in one of the walls. When Freeman died in 1937 the house was bought by Jacques Amsterdam who changed it into an apartment building naming it The Amsterdam Palace. In 1992 it was purchased by Gianni Versace to become his residence in South Beach. He restored and expanded the building by adding a south wing and a pool. Versace completely redecorated it. Gianni Versace and his partner Antonio D’Amico were regulars on the international party scene. A lot of famous people stayed in the house. Versace was murdered outside his Miami Beach home, the former Casa Casuarina now known as The Villa, at the age of 50 by Andrew Cunanan, a male prostitute and crazed C.S. Lewis fan. The Mansion now operates as a hotel, restaurant and event location. The restaurant is Il Sole at The Villa Casa Casuarina.
Note: The Hilton Garden Inn Miami South Beach - Royal Polo, formerly Embassy Hotel (2940 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33140) was the early location of Miami's Jewel Box Revue, from 1936 to 1939, featuring several dozen female impersonators and one male impersonator.
Life
Who: Giovanni Maria Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997)
Gianni Versace was an Italian fashion designer and founder of Versace, an international fashion house, which produces accessories, fragrances, make-up and home furnishings as well as clothes. He also designed costumes for the theatre and films. As a friend of Eric Clapton, Diana, Princess of Wales, Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Elton John, Cher, Sting and many other celebrities, he was the first designer to link fashion to the music world. Versace met his partner Antonio D’Amico, a model, in 1982. Their relationship lasted until Versace’s murder. During that time, D’Amico worked as a designer for the company, becoming head designer for Istante and Versus Sport. Versace’s will left D’Amico with a lifelong pension of 50 million lire (about US$26,000) per month, and the right to live in any of Versace’s homes in Italy and the United States. However, due to Versace family’s interference he only obtained a fraction of these allowances.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Villa Fontanelle is a villa (sometimes called a Palazzo) near Moltrasio on Lake Como, Lombardy, Italy, about 50 kilometres (31 mi) from Milan. The four-storey yellow-painted building was built in the first half of the XIX century by the eccentric Lord Charles Currie, a visiting Englishman who fell in love with Lake Como. Failing to find a villa for sale, he decided to create his own, right on the water’s edge.
Address: 22010 Moltrasio CO, Italy (45.85111, 9.08944)
Type: Private Property
Place
By 1977, when it was bought by the Italian designer Gianni Versace, it was in a state of abandonment, and the designer set about restoring it to its former neoclassical glory. The work, completed in December 1980, included landscaping the three acres (1.2 Ha) of ornamental gardens, which include three cottages, a tennis court, water frontage of some 800m and a private mooring. Versace personally chose hundreds of oil paintings and with other artworks displayed throughout the interior and exterior, he created a mini-palace that was a personal shrine. Before Versace’s death celebrities, such as Sir Elton John, Sting, Diana, Princess of Wales and Madonna, were regular guests at the property. Since the death of Versace in 1997, however, only American singer Jennifer Lopez and her husband Chris Judd were known to have visited, having spent their honeymoon there in 2001. Otherwise the property was a largely lifeless temple to Gianni Versace, and his taste for the adolescent male body. The estate is now owned by Russian millionaire restaurateur Arkady Novikov who bought it for 33 million Euros in early 2008 and retained Milanese architect Claudio Pozza to undertake restoration works at the property.
Life
Who: Gianni Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997)
Gianni Versace was an Italian fashion designer and founder of Versace. As a friend of Eric Clapton, Diana, Princess of Wales, Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Elton John, Cher, Sting, and many other celebrities, he was the first designer to link fashion to the music world. Openly homosexual, Versace and his partner Antonio D'Amico were regulars on the international party scene. Versace was murdered outside his Miami Beach home, the former Casa Casuarina now known as "The Villa," at the age of 50 by Andrew Cunanan. Versace's body was cremated and his ashes returned to the family's estate near Cernobbio, Italy. He is buried at Moltrasio cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4978266.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Raymond Roussel was a French poet, novelist, playwright, musician, and chess enthusiast. Through his novels, poems, and plays he exerted a profound influence on certain groups within 20th century French ...
Born: January 20, 1877, Paris, France
Died: July 14, 1933, Palermo
Education: Conservatoire de Paris
Lived: 25 Boulevard Malesherbes, Paris
47 Rue Pierre Charron, Paris
25 Boulevard Richard Wallace, Neuilly
Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes, Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 89

Raymond Roussel (January 20, 1877 – July 14, 1933) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, musician, and chess enthusiast. Through his novels, poems, and plays he exerted a profound influence on certain groups within XX century French literature, including the Surrealists, Oulipo, and the authors of the nouveau roman. He began to be rediscovered in the late 1950s, by the Oulipo and Alain Robbe-Grillet. His most direct influence in the English speaking world was on the New York School of poets; John Ashbery, Harry Mathews, James Schuyler, and Kenneth Koch briefly edited a magazine called Locus Solus after his novel. French theorist Michel Foucault's only book-length work of literary criticism is on Roussel. Roussel was born in Paris on January 20, 1877, to affluent parents: his father, Eugène, was a stockbrocker; his mother, Marguerite, was the daughter of a wealthy Paris businessman. They lived at 25 Boulevard Malesherbes, near the Madeleine Church, and were thus neighbors of the family of Marcel Proust, who lived at number 9 Boulevard Malesherbes. The Roussels also knew the painter Madeleine Lemaire, the principal model for Proust’s Mme. Verdurin, who painted a portrait of Raymond as a child. Later in life, Roussel became acquainted with Robert de Montesquiou, Proust’s Baron de Charlus, who wrote one of the first substantial critical essays on Roussel’s work. In the 1880s, the Roussels moved from the Boulevard Malesherbes to a splendid mansion just off the Champs-Elysées; they also spent time at a villa in the Bois de Boulogne at Neuilly and later summered in another villa overlooking the Atlantic at Biarritz.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

After the death of his mother in 1911, Raymond Roussel (1877–1933) inherited the house at 25 Boulevard Richard Wallace, Neuilly, and lived there in almost total isolation. His habits was to write during the mornings and to consume a single meal comprising breakfast, lunch, and dinner from early to late afternoon; these solitary repasts often included 27 courses. He was then free to spend the evening at the theatre, where, with the long-suffering Mme. Dufrène, his fake mistress, he often attended the same spectacle night after night, always sitting in the same seat if possible.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers, France). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay, France), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On 30 January 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Jamie Pedersen (born September 9, 1968)

Jamie Pedersen is an American lawyer and politician from the state of Washington who has served as a member of the Washington State Legislature since January 2007. He currently represents the 43rd District in the Washington State Senate.
Born: September 9, 1968 (age 48), Puyallup, Washington, United States
Education: Yale Law School
Puyallup High School
Yale University
Spouse: Eric Pedersen (m. 2004)
Party: Democratic Party
Residence: Seattle, Washington, United States
Succeeded by: Brady Walkinshaw
Anniversary: September 27
Married: July 3, 2004

Jamie Pedersen is an American lawyer and politician from the state of Washington who has served as a member of the Washington State Legislature since Jan. 2007. He currently represents the 43rd District in the Washington State Senate. Pedersen is married to Eric Cochran Pedersen, a high-school assistant principal whom he met while attending Central Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill in Seattle. They married at the same church on July 3, 2004. They registered as domestic partners on July 23, 2007, the day that the law went into effect. Their oldest son, Trygve, was born a month later on August 27. He was joined by his brothers Leif, Erik, and Anders on July 12, 2009. Pedersen graduated summa cum laude in American Studies from Yale and received his law degree from Yale Law School. Pedersen joined Preston Gates & Ellis in 1995, working on corporate mergers. His pro bono work during this time focused on gay rights issues and he was Lambda Legal's lead attorney on the state's same-sex marriage case – Andersen v. King County. In 2012 Pedersen publicly endorsed Washington Referendum 74, which legalized the same-sex marriage.
Together since 2004: 11 years.
Eric Cochran Pedersen
Jamie Pedersen (born September 9, 1968)
Anniversary: September 27
Married: July 3, 2004



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence.
Born: 1817
Buried: Cimitero Accatolico, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy, Plot: B11C/ B42/ 1194

The English Cemetery in Florence, Italy is at Piazzale Donatello. Its names, 'Cimitero Inglese' and 'Cimitero Protestante' are somewhat misleading, as the cemetery holds bodies of Orthodox Christians as well as those of many Reformed Churches; but the majority of those buried here were of the Anglophone British and American communities of Florence.
Address: Piazzale Donatello, 38, 50132 Firenze, Italy (43.77716, 11.26858)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 582608
Place
Before 1827 non-Catholics and non-Jews who died in Florence could be buried in Livorno only. In 1827 the Swiss Evangelical Reformed Church bought land outside the medieval wall and gate of Porta a' Pinti at Florence from Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany for an international and ecumenical cemetery, Russian and Greek Orthodox burials joining the Protestant ones. Carlo Reishammer, a young architectural student, landscaped the cemetery, then Giuseppe Poggi shaped it as its present oval when Florence became capital of Italy. He surrounded it with studios for artists, including that of Michele Gordigiani (who painted the portraits of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, now in the National Portrait Gallery, London). Many famous people are buried in the graveyard like Elizabeth Barrett Browning (in a tomb designed by Frederic, Lord Leighton); her son Pen Browning is buried at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori. Florence has always been a place were queer people from all over the world came due to its acceptance, wherelse in other countries was impossible to live. We cannot say if the following were really all queer couples, or maybe just special friends, the fact is that some of them chose to be buried near to each other.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Acattolico:
• Emilia Sophia Macpherson Abadam Adams (1776-1831) was the grandmother of both Alice Abadam, the suffragette, and Vernon Lee (aka Violet Page), the writer.
• Charles Bankhead, M.D. (1768-1859), George IV's Physician Extraordinary, he was the physician in attendance at Castlereagh's suicide.
• Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden (1816 or 1817–1873) was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence. Some of the surviving letters to Blagden from Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning are demonstrably affectionate. (Unfortunately Blagden's letters to them have not survived.) "Isa, perfect in companionship, as in other things," Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote of her. In one letter to Isa in the summer of 1859, she wrote: "My ever dearest, kindest Isa, I can't let another day go without writing just a word to say that I am alive enough to love you." In another from Paris a year earlier, Elizabeth Barrett Browning states that they had arrived "having lost nothing – neither a carpet-bag nor a bit of our true love for you."
• Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), died in her husband's arms. Robert Browning said that she died "smilingly, happily, and with a face like a girl's.... Her last word was... ''Beautiful". "On Monday July 1 the shops in the area around Casa Guidi were closed, while Elizabeth was mourned with unusual demonstrations." The nature of her illness is still unclear. Some modern scientists speculate her illness may have been hypokalemic periodic paralysis, a genetic disorder that causes weakness and many of the other symptoms she described.
• George Frederic Waihinger (1800-1867), German, was the beloved head waiter/butler to the Prince Demidoff of San Donato. Count Anatoly or Anatoli (called Anatole) Nikolaievich Demidov, 1st Prince of San Donato (1813–1870), was a Russian industrialist, diplomat and arts patron of the Demidov family.
• William Edgeworth (1832-1833), a one-year-old child unlisted in the Peerage though his two siblings Antonio Eroles and Francis Ysidro are. His mother is the Spanish Mariquita Eroles' sister, Rosa Florentina Eroles Edgeworth. His aunt is Maria Edgeworth, the great Irish novelist. He is buried in same plot with David (1807-1833) and Mary Reid (1833-1833), first husband and daughter of Mariquita Eroles, and Rev. Robert John Tennant (1809-1842), second husband of Mariquita. Mariquita Dorotea Francesca Tennant, née Eroles (1811–1860), is known as a social reformer. She is commemorated for helping the impoverished women of Windsor.
• Mary Farhill (1784-1854), small, clever, generous and eccentric, she was ennobled in Fiesole's Order of St Stephen. Farhill was found drowned in her bath at 70 years old. Though in Florence they thought she had no family when she died at the Villa il Palmerino, her brother Edward Farhill carefully arranged her burial in both English and Italian in a grand tomb. The Morning Post noted she willed her villa to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Maria Antonia. In the 1870s it came into the possession of the Earl of Belcarres and Crawford, Lord Lindsay. Dumas and Queen Victoria were guests under its roof. It later became Vernon Lee's residence.
• Harriet Theodosia Fisher, nee Garrow (1811-1848), half-sister of Theodosia Trollope, is buried with their maid, Elizabeth Shinner (1811-1852).
• James Lorimer "Lorrie" Graham, Jr (1831-1876), American Maecenas, married, gay, founded Graham's Magazine, had wealth, was shipwrecked and injured, appointed American Consul in Florence by President Grant, occupied the Palazzo di Valfonda, Claire Claremont (Mary Shelley's stepsister, who bore Lord Byron the child Allegra), lodging with him, and he collected autographs, books, paintings which he willed to the Century Association, New York, which sold them at auction.
• Hadrian Marryat (1845-1873). His maternal grandfather was General Lord Robert Edward Henry Somerset of Badminton House and his grandmother, Lady Louisa Augusta Courtenay, daughter of William Courtenay, 8th Earl of Devon, of Powderham Castle. The three Marryat children were painted in 1851-2 in Rome by the young Frederick Leighton.
• Clara Anastasia Novello (1818-1908), was an acclaimed soprano, the fourth daughter of Vincent Novello, a musician and music publisher, and his wife, Mary Sabilla Hehl. In 1843 she married Count Gigliucci, and retired in 1861. Clara Novello Davies (1861-1943), a well-known Welsh singer, teacher and conductor was named after Clara Novello. She married David Davies, a solicitor's clerk with the same surname as her own- Their son, David Ivor Davies, became better known as Ivor Novello, the actor, composer, dramatist and director.
• Eugene Polyakov (1943-1996), a Russian-trained balletmaster who was Rudolf Nureyev's chief assistant when Nureyev was director of the Paris Opera Ballet in the 1980's. Polyakov was born in Moscow and trained at the Bolshoi Ballet before leaving Russia for Venice in 1976. He formed his own troupe, Viva la Danza, there in 1977 and was the dance director of the Teatro Comunale in Florence from 1978 to 1983, when Nureyev appointed him balletmaster. Polyakov worked again in Florence from 1992 to 1995, when he returned to the Paris Opera Ballet. He died in Paris, but asked to be buried in Florence.
• Elena Raffalovich Comparetti (1842-1918) was an educator , intellectual and froebeliana Russian. She was the third daughter of Leo Raffalovich (1813-1879), wealthy jew landowner, and Rosette (Rosa) Mondel Loevensohn (1807-1895). The family moved to Paris. The older sister Maria Raffalovich, married to their uncle Hermann, is the mother of Marc André Raffalovich and great friend of Claude Bernard.
• William Reader of Banghurst House, Hampshire (1787-1846). His original tombstone identifies Henry Austin as his faithful servant; Austin died in Florence on July 5, 1859, age 40,
• The tomb of Mary Anne Salisbury (1798-1848) was placed by the Catholic wife of the last descendant of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Rosina, beneath a great yew tree at the entrance of the English Cemetery. It was tradition to have two yew trees, poisonous to cattle but essential for the English long bow of Agincourt in English graveyards, which also symbolize the Jachin and Boaz columns of the Jerusalem Temple. Only one yew tree remains and a falling branch from it destroyed this tomb, now replaced by the Rotary Club, 23/4/2012. The busts of Count Cosimo Buonarroti and Rosina which grace the Michelangelo museum at the Casa Buonarroti were sculpted by Aristodemo Costoli.
• James Bansfield’s tomb and that of King William IV's son's wife, Lady Georgina Hacking Hamilton Sewell, lie on either side of the king's natural son, Sir William Henry Sewell, each being apparently equal to Sir William. “Known as a servant above a servant a brother beloved. James died January 11, 1862. He was for 20 years the faithful and devoted servant of General Sir W.H. Sewell, K.C.B. by whose widow this tomb was raised.”
• Eleanore Emilie Contessa Stenbock-Fermor (1815-1859) was the daughter of Count Magnus Stenbock-Fermor, Russian Colonel. Her Oxford-educated PreRaphaelite poet nephew was Eric Stenbock.
• Theodosia Trollope, born Theodosia Garrow (1816–1865) was an English poet, translator, and writer known also for her marriage into the Trollope family. She married and bought a villa in Florence, Italy with her husband, Thomas Adolphus Trollope. Her hospitality made her home the centre of British society in the city. Her writings in support of the Italian nationalists are credited with changing public opinions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Barbara Stanwyck was an American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a ...
Born: July 16, 1907, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 20, 1990, Santa Monica, California, United States
Education: Erasmus Hall High School
Lived: 1055 Loma Vista Drive
Buried: Lone Pine, California (ashes)
Height: 1.65 m
Children: Anthony Dion Fay
Spouse: Robert Taylor (m. 1939–1952), Frank Fay (m. 1928–1935)

Barbara Stanwyck was an American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang and Frank Capra. She was often cast as a tough woman in a man’s world, always in command and control, whether playing a reporter (Meet John Doe), a criminal manipulator (Double Indemnity, The Lady Eve), or a husbandless rancher (The Big Valley). She played a lesbian in Walk on the Wild Side, and it was not much of a stretch. For nearly thirty years, Stanwyck had an intimate relationship with her publicist Helen Ferguson, former actress. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, and Robert Taylor, among others. Ferguson represented actress Loretta Young for more than nineteen years.
They met in 1947 and remained friends until Ferguson’s death in 1977: 30 years.
Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990)
Helen Ferguson (July 23, 1901 - March 14, 1977)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Barbara Stanwyck's career spanned fifty years, from the Golden Age of Movies through her time in television. She was nominated for four Academy Awards, was given an hon-orary Oscar in 1982, and notably portrayed the matriarch in TV's “The Big Valley.” For many years, she and film star Robert Taylor were lovers. After his death in 1969, the actress began to see his spirit in her Beverly Hills home, at 1055 Loma Vista Drive, off Sunset Boulevard, and visitations continued right up until her own death in 1990. Upon her death at age 82, her will demanded her ashes be spread in Lone Pine, California.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Patricia Highsmith was an American novelist and short story writer, known for her psychological thrillers, which led to more than two dozen film adaptations.
Born: January 19, 1921, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
Died: February 4, 1995, Locarno, Switzerland
Education: Barnard College
Columbia University
Lived: 48 Grove Street
345 E. 57th Street
Casa Highsmith, Tegna
Buried: Cimitero di Tegna, Tegna, Distretto di Locarno, Ticino, Switzerland
Movies: Carol, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Purple Noon, more
Parents: Jay Bernard Plangman, Stanley Highsmith, Mary Coates Plangman

Patricia Highsmith wrote 22 novels, many of them set in Greenwich Village, where she lived at 48 Grove Street from 1940 to 1942, before moving at 345 E. 57th Street.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Tegna, in Switzerland’s Italian-speaking canton Ticino, is the village where Patricia Highsmith lived out the last years of her life, in the Vallemaggia, a narrow, rocky valley behind Locarno. Her ashes are immured in the cemetery and her famously bunker-like house is down the road.
Address: Tegna, Switzerland (46.1867, 8.74433)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1988, Patricia Highsmith built the house she died in, with the help of Zurich-based architect Tobias Ammann. “Casa Highsmith,” a modernist flat-roofed single storey “M” shaped construction in the small village of Tegna in the Ticino, Switzerland, “bore a curious resemblance,” according to the Swiss National Library in Bern, “to the “long, low and flat-roofed” and “shining white” and Y-shaped house she imagined thirty years earlier for the architect Guy Haines [the hapless and fateful victim] in “Strangers on the Train” (before a second floor was added by new owners after her death).” She ended up curating herself in the shape of her own architecture; the fiction that, in hindsight, predicted her own house. Her final “dream home” had all along been “half felt and feebly” lodged within her own strange enactments designed to be so implausible as to contain the implicit sense of fate and inevitability within any choice.
Life
Who: Patricia Highsmith (January 19, 1921 – February 4, 1995)
Patricia Highsmith was an American novelist and short story writer, known for her psychological thrillers, which led to more than two dozen film adaptations. Her first novel, “Strangers on a Train,” has been adapted for stage and screen numerous times, notably by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. Highsmith wrote 22 novels, including her series of five novels with Tom Ripley as protagonist, and many short stories. Michael Dirda observed, "Europeans honored her as a psychological novelist, part of an existentialist tradition represented by her own favorite writers, in particular Dostoyevsky, Conrad, Kafka, Gide, and Camus." Highsmith loved cats, and she bred about three hundred snails in her garden at home in Suffolk, England. Between 1959 and 1961, she fell in love with Marijane Meaker, who wrote under the pseudonyms "Vin Packer" and "Ann Aldrich" and later wrote young adult fiction as "M.E. Kerr". In the late 1980s, after 27 years of separation, Highsmith began corresponding with Meaker again, and one day showed up on Meaker's doorstep, slightly drunk and ranting bitterly. Meaker later said she was horrified at how Highsmith's personality had changed. Highsmith, aged 74, died from a combination of aplastic anemia and lung cancer at Carita hospital in Locarno, Switzerland, near the village where she had lived since 1982. She was cremated at the cemetery in Bellinzona, a memorial service was conducted in the Catholic Church in Tegna and her ashes interred in its columbarium. She left her estate, worth an estimated $3 million, and the promise of any future royalties to the Yaddo colony, where she spent two months in 1948 writing the draft of “Strangers on a Train.” Patricia Highsmith bequeathed her literary estate to the Swiss Literary Archives at the Swiss National Library in Bern, Switzerland.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Ogden Codman Jr. was an American architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles, and co-author with Edith Wharton of The Decoration of Houses, which became a standard in American interior design.
Born: January 19, 1863, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 8, 1951, France
Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Books: The Decoration of Houses, The Decoration of Houses - Scholar's Choice Edition
People also search for: Edith Wharton, Richard Morris Hunt, Francis L.V. Hoppin, Seth C. Bradford, Lucy Wharton Drexel
Lived: Codman House, 34 Codman Rd, Lincoln, MA 01773, USA (42.41838, -71.33083)
7 East 96th Street, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78782, -73.95489)
Château de Grégy, 7 Allée du Château, 77166 Évry-Grégy-sur-Yerre, France (48.65295, 2.63185)
Villa Leopolda, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France (43.70397, 7.3111)
Buried: Lincoln Cemetery, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA

Ogden Codman, Jr. was an American architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles, and co-author with Edith Wharton of The Decoration of Houses (1897). Codman spent his youth from 1875 to 1884 at Dinard, an American resort colony in France, and on returning to America in 1884, studied at the MIT. Wharton became one of his first Newport clients for her home there, Land's End. Subsequently she introduced Codman to Cornelius Vanderbilt II, who hired him to design the second and third floor rooms of his Newport summer home, The Breakers. In 1907, Codman built the Codman-Davis House in Washington, D.C. for his cousin Martha Codman, one of the few intact homes that he designed. This included a carriage house, now the Apex Night Club, ironically a gay club. Although a noted homosexual, on 8 October, 1904, Codman married one of his commissioner, Leila Griswold Webb, widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, who died unexpectedly in 1910. In 1920, Codman left New York to return to France, where he spent the rest of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer: it is his masterpiece, the fullest surviving expression of his esthetic.
Together from 1904 to 1910: 6 years.
Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (November 12, 1856 - January 21, 1910)
Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 - January 8, 1951)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Codman House (also known as The Grange) is a historic house set on a 16-acre (6.5 ha) estate at 34 Codman Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts.
Address: 34 Codman Rd, Lincoln, MA 01773, USA (42.41838, -71.33083)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone:+1 617-994-6671
National Register of Historic Places: 74000373, 1974
Place
Built in approximately 1735 in the Georgian style
Thanks to a gift by Dorothy Codman, Codman Estate has been owned by Historic New England since 1969 and is open to the public June 1–October 15 on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month. The main house was originally built by Chambers Russell I. It was enlarged in the 1790s to its current three-story Federal style by John Codman, brother-in-law of Chambers Russell III and executor of his estate. This was perhaps with some involvement of noted American architect Charles Bulfinch. The interior is extensively furnished with portraits, memorabilia, and art works collected in Europe. Various rooms preserve the decorative schemes of every era, including those of noted interior designer Ogden Codman, Jr. The former carriage house, built c. 1870 to a design by Snell and Gregerson, is also located on the property. Until the 1980s, it was original to its use as a stable and an early auto garage and contained many artifacts of both. A few of those artifacts continue to be on display in the carriage house including an early gas pump and a large machine powered lathe. The grounds have been farmed almost continuously since 1735 and now also include an Italian garden, circa 1899, with perennial beds, statuary, and a reflecting pool filled with waterlilies, as well as an English cottage garden, circa 1930.
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
Codman was born to Ogden Codman, Sr. (of Boston and the Codman House) and the former Sarah Bradlee in Boston, Massachusetts. He spent his youth from 1875 to 1884 at Dinard, an American resort colony in France, and on returning to America in 1884, studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was influenced in his career by two uncles, John Hubbard Sturgis (architect) and Richard Ogden (a decorator), and admired Italian and French architecture of the XVI, XVII, and XVIII centuries, as well as English Georgian architecture and the colonial architecture of Boston. While he died at Evry-Gregy-sur-Yerre in France, he is buried at Lincoln Cemetery (Lincoln, MA 01773).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Although Ogden Codman, Jr. had been born in Boston, he grew up in Paris and his love for all things French was deep-rooted.
Addresses:
Archer M. Huntington house, 1083 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78361, -73.95848)
Lucy D. Dahlgren house, 15 East 96th Street, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.7877, -73.95455)
Ogden Codman house, 7 East 96th Street, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78782, -73.95489)
American Irish Historical Society, 991 Fifth Avenue, NY 10128, USA (40.7777, -73.96278)
Acquavella Galleries, 18 East 79th Street, NY 10128, USA (40.77623, -73.96266)
Place
- Archer M. Huntington house, 1083 Fifth Avenue: Archer Milton Huntington (1870-1955) was the son of Arabella (née Duval) Huntington and the stepson of railroad magnate and industrialist Collis P. Huntington. A lifelong friend of the arts, he is known for his scholarly works in the field of Hispanic Studies and for founding The Hispanic Society of America in New York City. While Huntington was busy establishing and donating museums he also set to work remodeling his home. The decorator Ogden Codman, Jr. was extremely popular among the moneyed set and Huntington commissioned him to renovate No. 1083. In 1913 he began transforming the façade into a limestone-clad XVIII century French townhouse. A four-story bowed front with a rusticated base culminated in a deep balcony behind a stone balustrade at the fifth floor. A stately mansard roof with copper trim composed the sixth floor. Tall French doors above the entrance were finished with a segmental arched pediment. Codman made use of Huntington’s vacant plot behind the property to enlarge the house with an addition creating an L-shape that extended to East 89th Street. The second floor was dedicated solely to entertaining. The Huntingtons’ living quarters were on the third floor and the top two floors were outfitted as servants’ rooms – enough to accommodate 25 servants. The outward appearance of Archer Milton Huntington’s stately mansion is essentially unchanged since Ogden Codman, Jr. revamped it in 1914. While the three other homes purchased by Huntington in 1902 have been demolished and replaced with a sterile white brick apartment building, No. 1083 elegantly survives. Currently the National Academy Museum and School, notable queer alumni and faculty: Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), Jasper Johns (born 1930), Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008), John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), Cy Twombly (1928-2011).
- Lucy Drexel Dahlgren house, 15 East 96th Street: The Lucy Drexel Dahlgren House is a historic home located at 15 East 96th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues on the border between the Carnegie Hill and East Harlem neighborhoods of the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1915-16, and was designed by Ogden Codman, Jr. in the French Renaissance Revival stye for Lucy Wharton Drexel Dahlgren, a daughter of financier Joseph William Drexel (1833-1888) and Lucy Wharton (1841-1912.) She was the sister of Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (1868-1944.) The limestone house is a companion to Codman’s own residence down the street at 7 East 96th Street, which he designed for himself and had built in 1912-13. The AIA Guide to New York City describes the Dahlgren house as "magisterial" and "disciplined." It features "gentle restications and bas-reliefs." The extremely wealthy and socially prominent Dahlgren spent little time in the house. It was later occupied for many years by Pierre Cartier, the founder of the Cartier’s jewelry store. Apparently, Dahlgren rented the house to Cartier from 1922 on, until she sold it to him in 1927. In 1945, on his retirement, Cartier sold the house to the Roman Catholic Church of St. Francis de Sales, which used it as a convent for the nuns who taught at the church’s parochial school. In 1981 the church sold the house to a private owner, who restored it. It is located within the Upper East Side Historic District.
- Ogden Codman house, 7 East 96th Street: In 1907 Codman purchased the lot at 7 East 96th Street, still several blocks north of the area where the main thrust of mansion building was going on. While they were still contemplating their new home, Codman’s wife of only six years died in 1910. Now alone, Codman set about designing the elegant residence his wife would never share. Completed in 1913, it was a slice of Paris set down on 96th Street. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission later described the facade of number 7 as being "full of gaiety and frivolous vitality" and further, "on approaching the house, Paris and the Champs-Élysées immediately come to mind." Ogden Codman lived in his grand home with six servants and his chauffeur until 1920 when he left for his beloved Paris. In December of that year he negotiated a lease by cable to rent the house furnished to George Edward Kent. Kent paid an annual rent of $25,000. The Manhattan Country School purchased the house in 1965. In 2000 a restoration of the façade, including slate roof and copper dormer replacement, and masonry cleaning was completed. The interiors remain almost perfectly intact. The little slice of Paris created by Ogden Codman, Jr. looks much today as it did when he moved in nearly a century ago.
- American Irish Historical Society, 991 Fifth Avenue: Completed in 1901, the lavish Beaux-Arts mansion on Fifth Avenue was a showplace. With a rusticated limestone base, the first three floors bowed out creating a stone-balustraded balcony at the fourth floor. The architects James R. Turner and William. G. Killian chose ruddy-colored brick with carved limestone detailing for the middle three floors, capping it with a dramatic mansard roof with three elegant copper-clad dormers. Here Mary A. King, unmarried daughter of John A. King, lived with her five Irish servants for only a few years until her death. Banker David Crawford Clark purchased the home on April 16, 1906. A member of the firm Clark, Dodge & Co., Clark and his wife were socially prominent and in 1911 commissioned Ogden Codman, Jr., to redesign the interiors. In 1939 the American Irish Historical Society purchased the residence for $145,000 and moved in a year later after renovations were completed. By 2006, the house was what the president-general of the Society, Dr. Kevin Cahill, called “in a state of utter disrepair.” The basement regularly flooded, the electrical and plumbing systems were outdated and the masonry required overall restoration. An aggressive, two-year restoration and renovation was initiated under the direction of Joseph Pell Lombardi. In some cases, the walls were taken down to the studs and lath before the building could be brought into the XX Century and returned to its original grandeur. Original drawings by Odgen Codman Jr., maintained in the New York City Department of Buildings, were consulted to ensure accuracy. The $5 million restoration was completed in March 2008. Today the rich Beaux-Arts mansion with its equally-rich society history sits solidly in the XXI Century while losing none if its century-old architectural integrity.
- J. Woodward Haven House now Acquavella Galleries, 18 East 79th Street: Acquavella Galleries is an art gallery in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Since 1967, the gallery has occupied an elegant five-story French neo-classical townhouse at 18 East 79th, once the New York outpost of London art firm founded by Joseph Duveen. Today, a range of XX century art is represented, including Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism.
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
Ogden Codman, Jr.’s New York clients included John D. Rockefeller, Jr., for whom he designed the interiors of the famous Rockefeller family mansion of Kykuit in 1913, and Frederick William Vanderbilt, for whom he designed the interiors for his mansion in Hyde Park, New York, and his house on Fifth Avenue. He also collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue as well as on the design of The Mount, her house in Lenox, Massachusetts. His suave and idiomatic suite of Régence and Georgian parade rooms for entertaining are preserved in the townhouse at 991 Fifth Avenue, now occupied by the American Irish Historical Society. His French townhouse in the manner of Gabriel at 18 East 79th Street, for J. Woodward Haven (1908–09) is now occupied by Acquavella Galleries. All told, Codman designed 22 houses to completion, as well as the East Wing of the Metropolitan Club in New York. He also began the trend of lowering the townhouse entrance door from elevated stairways to the basement level. He designed a series of three houses in Louis XIV style at 7 (his own residence), 12, and 15 East 96th Street from 1912 to 1916.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Château de Grègy is a château in Évry-Grégy-sur-Yerre, Seine-et-Marne, France.
Address: 7 Allée du Château, 77166 Évry-Grégy-sur-Yerre, France (48.65295, 2.63185)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Saturday 9.00-11.45, Monday and Friday 13.30-17.30
Phone:+33 1 64 05 28 16
Place
Built in 1620
The first château was built by Antoine de Brennes and only two towers remain. Antoine de Clairambault rebuilt the central portion at the beginning of the XIX century, and added wings connecting the tower of a former church to the main building. American decorator and architect Ogden Codman, Jr. owned the château in the XX century, adding its entry pavilions. The chateau is situated along the Yerres River, and is reached via the Pont Saint-Pierre (XVII century.)
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
In 1920, Ogden Codman, Jr. left New York to return to France, where he spent the last thirty-one years of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer. Codman died at age 87 in 1951. His architectural drawings and papers are collected at the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University; the Codman Family papers are also held by Historic New England and the Boston Athenaeum.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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The Villa La Leopolda is a large detached villa in Villefranche-sur-Mer, in the Alpes-Maritimes department on the French Riviera. The villa is situated in 18 acres of grounds.
Address: Villefranche-sur-Mer, France (43.70397, 7.3111)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built from 1929 to 1931, Design by Ogden Codman, Jr. (1863-1951)
Villa La Leopolda in its current incarnation was built on an estate once owned by King Leopold II of Belgium. The villa has had several notable owners including Gianni and Marella Agnelli, Izaak and Dorothy J. Killam, and since 1987 by Edmond (1932–1999) and Lily Safra, who inherited the villa after her husband’s death. King Leopold II of Belgium had made the previous estate a present for his mistress Blanche Zélia Joséphine Delacroix, also known as Caroline Lacroix, and it derives its name from him. After Leopold’s death, Blanche Delacroix was evicted, and his nephew, King Albert I, became its owner. During WWI it was used as a military hospital. In 1919, Thérèse Vitali, comtesse de Beauchamp, acquired the property and commissioned modifications. The American architect Ogden Codman, Jr. purchased the dozen existing structures that made up the property including two peasant cottages, and began his architectural magnum opus in 1929. It was complete by 1931, however financial difficulties (and his lavish expenditures) precluded his being able to live in it, so he rented it out to various well-heeled tenants. One famous English couple tried to lease it, but insisted on making changes that were contrary to Codman’s aesthetic objectives and strict list of protective clauses. Negotiations in a Paris Hotel room broke down over the many restrictions Codman imposed, and Ogden’s response was: "I regret that the House of Codman is unable to do business with the House of Windsor." Codman’s extensive designs and construction gave the estate, once a series of unrelated buildings, its current appearance. His neo-Palladian vision, coupled with his in-depth knowledge of historical precedent, resulted in the construction of a spectacular villa with extensive gardens and landscaping. Floor plans, letters, records, and stereo glass-plate views of the newly completed property still exist in the collections of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (aka "Historic New England.”)
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
In 1920, Ogden Codman, Jr. left New York to return to France, where he spent the last thirty-one years of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer, which he created by assembling a number of vernacular structures and their sites: it is his masterpiece, the fullest surviving expression of his esthetic.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Morris Kight was an American gay rights pioneer and peace activist. He is considered one of the original founders of the gay and lesbian civil rights movement in the United States.
Born: November 19, 1919, Comanche County, Texas, United States
Died: January 19, 2003, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Texas Christian University
Lived: 1822 W 4th St, Los Angeles, CA 90057, USA (34.06055, -118.27037)
Organizations founded: Gay Liberation Front, Los Angeles LGBT Center

Morris Kight was a gay rights pioneer and peace activist, based in Los Angeles. He is considered one of the original founders of the gay and lesbian civil rights movement in the United States. In 1958, Kight moved to Los Angeles, where he was the founder or co-founder of many gay and lesbian organizations. The first such organization was the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) in October 1969, the third GLF in the country (after New York and Berkeley). By the next year, there were over 350 GLF organizations around the country. He had a longtime companion named Roy Zucheran, whom he met in 1978. Three days before his death, he donated his memorabilia and archives to the National Gay and Lesbian Archives in Los Angeles. UCLA also has possession of some of his archives. There is a Chinese magnolia tree and a bronze plaque dedicated to him at the Matthew Shepard Triangle in West Hollywood. Morris Kight used to visit this park weekly to tidy up the area, water and plant new flowers. He encouraged others to do the same.
Together from 1978 to 2003: 25 years.
Morris Kight (November 19, 1919 - January 19, 2003)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Though his work focused on Los Angeles, Morris Kight's contributions to the LGBTQ community have spanned the globe. The Gay Community Services Center (now the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center) has grown into the world's largest provider of LGBTQ programs and services. Since Christopher Street West's founding march in 1970 in Los Angeles, gay pride parades and festivals are not only celebrated across the U.S. during the month of June, but also across six continents. Kight remained an influential LGBTQ rights activist late in life. In 1987, he served as a leader of the Second National March on Washington for Gay Rights. The following year, he received a lifetime achievement award from the West Hollywood City Council.
Address: 1822 W 4th St, Los Angeles, CA 90057, USA (34.06055, -118.27037)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Morris Kight (November 19, 1919 - January 19, 2003)
Morris Kight is considered one of the founding fathers of the American LGBTQ civil rights movement. Though little is known about his Los Angeles residence, this modest Craftsman home in the Westlake neighborhood—a hub of LGBTQ social activity in the twentieth century—helped form the backdrop to his work as activist and gay rights pioneer. Born and raised in Texas, Kight moved to Los Angeles in 1958, where he would go on to co-found several prominent LGBTQ rights organizations. The most notable of these is the Commitee for Homosexual Freedom, which became the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) in 1969. At the time of the GLF's founding in Los Angeles, two other chapters of the GLF were flourishing in Berkeley and New York. Kight also spearheaded the creation of the Gay Community Services Center, which today is known as the Los Angeles LGBT Center. In 1970, Kight co-founded the Christopher Street West gay pride parade in Los Angeles, the first gay pride parade and festival in the world and still a model for pride events across the globe.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4976892.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Catherine Talbot was an English author and member of the Blue Stockings Society.
Born: May 1721, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Died: January 19, 1770, London, United Kingdom
People also search for: Elizabeth Carter, Elizabeth Vesey, Montagu 1762-1849 Pennington, Ed
Lived: Lambeth Palace, Lambeth, London SE1 7JU, UK (51.49577, -0.11984)

Elizabeth Carter was an English poet, classicist, writer and translator, and a member of the Bluestocking Circle. Catherine Talbot was an English author. February 1741 saw the beginning of her lifelong friendship with Elizabeth Carter. The two women carried on a lively and copious correspondence. During the whole period of her residence with Thomas Secker, a protégé of Talbot’s father, Catherine Talbot was Secker's almoner. In 1760, accompanied by Elizabeth Carter, she went to Bristol for her health. Secker died in 1768, leaving to Mrs. Talbot and her daughter £13,000 in the public funds. The women moved from Lambeth Palace to Lower Grosvenor Street. There Catherine died of cancer on January 9, 1770, aged 48. Several poems were written in her praise. At her daughter's death in 1770, Mrs. Talbot put her daughter's manuscripts into Elizabeth Carter's hand, leaving their publication to her discretion.
Together from 1741 to 1770: 29 years.
Elizabeth Carter (December 16, 1717 – February 19, 1806)
Catherine Talbot (May 1721 – January 9, 1770)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury in England, in north Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames, 400 m south-east of the Palace of Westminster which has the Houses of Parliament on the opposite bank.
Address: Lambeth, London SE1 7JU, UK (51.49577, -0.11984)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 9.30-17.30
Phone: +44 20 7898 1200
English Heritage Building ID: 204400 (Grade I, 1951)
Place
It was at Lambeth Palace where Mary Benson came into her own. As wife of the Archbishop of Canterbury she found her wit, conversational dexterity and irresistible charm suddenly given wide social range. Mary described life at Lambeth Palace as a “thunderous whirlpool,” a “beating fervent keen pulsating life” of queens and countesses, of discussing politics with prime ministers and dining with poets laureate. The building – originally called the Manor of Lambeth or Lambeth House – has been the London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for nearly 800 years, whose original residence was in Canterbury, Kent. It was acquired by the archbishopric around 1200 AD and has the largest collection of records of the church in its library. It is bounded by Lambeth Palace Road to the west and Lambeth Road to the south but unlike all surrounding land is excluded from the parish of North Lambeth. The garden park is listed and resembles Archbishop’s Park, a neighbouring public park, however was a larger area with a notable orchard until the early XIX century. The former church in front of its entrance has been converted to the Garden Museum. Back in XVIII century, also Catherine Talbot (1721-1770), part of the household of Thomas Secker, Archbihop of Canterbury, lived at Lambeth Palace. Catherine was part of the Blue Stocking Society and had a special friendship with Elizabeth Carter (1717-1806) to whom Catherine’s mother gave her manuscripts after the death from cancer in 1770 of her daughter.
Life
Who: Mary Benson, née Sidgwick (1841 – June 15, 1918)
Mary Benson was an hostess of the Victorian era. She was the wife of Revd. Edward Benson, who during their marriage became Archbishop of Canterbury, i.e. chief bishop of the Church of England and of the world-wide Anglican communion. Their children included several prolific authors and contributors to cultural life. During her marriage, she was involved with Lucy Tait (1856-1938), daughter of the previous Archbishop of Canterbury. She was described by Gladstone, the British Prime Minister, as the “cleverest woman in Europe.” Between 1860 and 1871 she had six children. Their fifth child was the novelist, E. F. Benson, best remembered for the Mapp and Lucia novels and who displeased Oscar Wilde by taking Wilde’s lover Lord Alfred Douglas on a riotous holiday up the Nile. Another son was Arthur A. C. Benson, the author of the lyrics to Elgar’s "Land of Hope and Glory" and master of Magdalene College, Cambridge. Their sixth and youngest child, Robert Hugh Benson, became a priest in the Church of England before converting to Roman Catholicism and writing many popular novels and had a passionate friendship with the writer Frederick Rolfe (the selfstyled “Baron Corvo.”) Their daughter, Margaret “Maggie” Benson was an artist, author and amateur Egyptologist and, accompanied by her friend Nettie Gourlay, ruled over archaeological digs with a whip and a few words of Arabic. After her husband’s death in 1896 Mary set up household with Lucy Tait, daughter of the previous archbishop of Canterbury, Archibald Campbell Tait, who had first moved in with the Bensons in 1889. None of her sons or daughter was “the marrying sort.” At times the family would gather – their various handsome valets and faithful companions in tow – at Mary and Lucy’s house. But Maggie, insanely jealous of Mary’s relationship with Lucy, tried to kill her mother and was institutionalised. Arthur suffered numerous breakdowns. Hugh troubled Mary with his highly public Catholicism and died young. Her friend, the composer Ethel Smyth (1858-1944), once remarked that she was, “as good as God and as clever as the Devil.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4952391.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Brion Gysin was a painter, writer, sound poet, and performance artist born in Taplow, Buckinghamshire. He is best known for his discovery of the cut-up technique, used by his friend, the novelist William S. Burroughs.
Born: January 19, 1916, Taplow, United Kingdom
Died: July 13, 1986, Paris, France
Education: Sorbonne
Lived: Beat Hotel, Relais Hôtel du Vieux Paris, 9, rue Git-le-Coeur, 6th arr., 75006 Paris, France (48.85391, 2.34285)
Artwork: Calligraffiti of Fire, more
Movies: The Cut Ups, Flicker, Destroy All Rational Thought, William S. Burroughs: Thee Films: 1950s-1960s
Parents: Leonard Gysin, Stella Margaret Martin

The Beat Hotel was a small, run-down hotel of 42 rooms at 9 Rue Gît-le-Cœur in the Latin Quarter of Paris, notable chiefly as a residence for members of the Beat poetry movement of the mid-XX century.
Address: Relais Hôtel du Vieux Paris, 9, rue Git-le-Coeur, 6th arr., 75006 Paris, France (48.85391, 2.34285)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +33 1 44 32 15 90
Place
The Beat Hotel was a "class 13" hotel, meaning bottom line, a place that was required by law to meet only minimum health and safety standards. It never had any proper name – "the Beat Hotel" was a nickname given by Gregory Corso, which stuck. The rooms had windows facing the interior stairwell and not much light. Hot water was available Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. The hotel offered the opportunity for a bath – in the only bathtub, situated on the ground floor – provided the guest reserved time beforehand and paid the surcharge for hot water. Curtains and bedspreads were changed and washed every spring. The linen was (in principle) changed every month. The Beat Hotel was managed by a married couple, Monsieur and Madame Rachou, from 1933. After the death of Monsieur Rachou in a traffic accident in 1957, Madame was the sole manager until the early months of 1963, when the hotel was closed. Besides letting rooms, the establishment had a small bistro on the ground floor. Due to early experiences with working at an inn frequented by Monet and Pissarro, Madame Rachou would encourage artists and writers to stay at the hotel and even at times permit them to pay the rent with paintings or manuscripts. One unusual thing that appealed to a clientele of bohemian artists was the permission to paint and decorate the rooms rented in whichever way they wanted. The hotel gained fame through the extended “family” of beat writers and artists who stayed there from the late 1950s to the early 1960s in a ferment of creativity. Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky first stayed there in 1957 and were soon joined by William S. Burroughs, Derek Raymond, Harold Norse and Gregory Corso, as well as Sinclair Beiles. It was here that Burroughs completed the text of “Naked Lunch” and began his lifelong collaboration with Brion Gysin. It was also where Ian Sommerville became Burroughs’ “systems advisor” and lover. Gysin introduced Burroughs to the Cut-up technique and with Sommerville they experimented with a “dream machine” and audio tape cut-ups. Here Norse wrote a novel, “Beat Hotel,” using cut-up techniques. Ginsberg wrote a part of his moving and mature poem “Kaddish” at the hotel and Corso wrote the mushroom cloud-shaped poem “Bomb.” There is now a small hotel, the four-star Relais du Vieux Paris, at that address. It displays photographs of several Beat personalities and describes itself as "The Beat Hotel.” In July 2009, as part of a major William Burroughs symposium, NakedLunch@50, a special tribute was held outside 9 Rue Gît-le-Coeur, with Jean-Jacques Lebel unveiling a plaque commemorative, now permanently hammered to the outside wall next to the main entrance, honoring the Beat Hotel’s seven most famous occupants: B. Gysin, H. Norse, G. Corso, A. Ginsberg, P. Orlovsky, I. Sommerville, W. Burroughs.
Life
Who: William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997)
William Burroughs moved into the rundown hotel in the Latin Quarter of Paris in 1959 when “Naked Lunch” was still looking for a publisher. Tangier, with its easy access to drugs, small groups of homosexuals, growing political unrest, and an odd collection of criminals, had become increasingly unhealthy for Burroughs. He went to Paris to meet Ginsberg and talk with Olympia Press. In so doing, he left a brewing legal problem, which eventually transferred itself to Paris. Paul Lund, a British former career criminal and cigarette smuggler whom Burroughs met in Tangier, was arrested on suspicion of importing narcotics into France. Lund gave up Burroughs, and some evidence implicated Burroughs in the possible importation of narcotics into France. Once again, the man faced criminal charges, this time in Paris for conspiracy to import opiates, when the Moroccan authorities forwarded their investigation to French officials. Yet it was under this impending threat of criminal sanction that Maurice Girodias published “Naked Lunch;” the publication helped in getting Burroughs a suspended sentence, since a literary career, according to Ted Morgan, is a respected profession in France. The "Beat Hotel" was a typical European-style boarding house hotel, with common toilets on every floor, and a small place for personal cooking in the room. Life there was documented by the photographer Harold Chapman, who lived in the attic room. This shabby, inexpensive hotel was populated by Gregory Corso, Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky for several months after “Naked Lunch” first appeared. The actual process of publication was partly a function of its "cut-up" presentation to the printer. Girodias had given Burroughs only ten days to prepare the manuscript for print galleys, and Burroughs sent over the manuscript in pieces, preparing the parts in no particular order. When it was published in this authentically random manner, Burroughs liked it better than the initial plan. International rights to the work were sold soon after, and Burroughs used the $3,000 advance from Grove Press to buy drugs (equivalent to approximately $24,353 in today’s funds.) “Naked Lunch” was featured in a 1959 Life magazine cover story, partly as an article that highlighted the growing Beat literary movement. During this time Burroughs found an outlet for material otherwise rendered unpublishable in Jeff Nuttall’s My Own Mag. Also, some of Burroughs poetry appeared in the avant garde little magazine Nomad at the beginning of the 1960s. Ian Sommerville (1940–1976) was an electronics technician and computer programmer. He is primarily known through his association with William S. Burroughs’s circle of Beat Generation figures, and lived at Paris’s so-called "Beat Hotel" by 1960, when they were regulars there, becoming Burroughs’s lover and "systems adviser.” He died in a single-car accident due to inexperience near Bath, England in 1976 shortly after obtaining his first driving licence.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Boris Evgenievich Kochno or Kokhno was a Russian poet, dancer and librettist. Kochno was born in Moscow, Russia, on 3 January 1904. His father served as a colonel in the hussars.
Born: January 3, 1904, Moscow, Russia
Died: December 8, 1990, Paris, France
Books: Christian Bʹerard, Diaghilev, and the Ballets Russes
Libretti: Mavra
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 16
Buried alongside: Wladimir Augenblick

After Nijinsky, Diaghilev's next discovery was an unknown young actor, Léonide Massine, whom he developed into a great dancer and one of the seminal choreographers of the 20th century. They were together until 1920, when Massine married. Diaghilev successively fell in love with: Boris Kochno, a precocious young poet who eventually became associate director of Ballets Russes; Anton Dolin, a vivacious British dancer; Serge Lifar, a young Russian who traveled to Paris in 1924 determined to seduce Diaghilev and who became the premier danseur of Ballets Russes and, later, the director of the Paris Opera Ballet; and Igor Markevitch, a musical prodigy. Markevitch's first wife was Kyra Nijinska (1913/1914-1998), daughter of Vaslav Nijinsky. She bore him a son, Vaslav (b. 1936), before they divorced.
Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (March 31, 1872 – August 19, 1929)
Leonid Fyodorovich Myasin aka Léonide Massine (August 9, 1896 –March 15, 1979)
Boris Evgenievich Kochno (January 3, 1904 – December 8, 1990)
Sir Anton Dolin (July 27, 1904 –November 25, 1983)
Serge Lifar (April 15, 1905 –December 15, 1986)
Igor Markevitch (July 27, 1912 – March 7, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Alice Eastwood was a Canadian American botanist. She is credited with building the botanical collection at the California Academy of Sciences, located in San Francisco. She published over 310 scientific articles.
Born: January 19, 1859, Toronto, Canada
Died: October 30, 1953, San Francisco, California, United States
Buried: Toronto Necropolis Cemetery and Crematorium, Toronto, Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Field: Botany
Institutions: California Academy of Sciences, more

In 1909 Emily Williams undertook the remodelling of Katherine Chandler’s Deer Park Inn near Lake Tahoe. Emily probably met Chandler, a botanist and author, in Pacific Grove where Chandler frequently rented a corrage. Both women were friends of Etta Belle Lloyd, a Pacific Grove businesswoman who ran an insurance agency and managed several commercial properties that had been owned by her father David.
Address: Olympic Valley, CA 96146, USA (39.19698, -120.2357)
Type: Public Park
Place
Many years before the Alpine Meadows Ski Area was developed the Deer Park Springs Hotel was constructed by John Brown Scott who owned land in Squaw Valley where he and his wife ran a successful dairy ranch that had been previously owned and operated by her first husband John P. Scott. In 1880 they completed construction of a 3 story 20 room hotel. 8 cabins were added with in the following 3 years. Across Bear Creek were iron, sulphur, and soda mineral springs which lured guests who bathed in them for health reasons. A social hall, stable, and barn were constructed to house horses and milk cows. The cabins had names such as “Forty Nine” named after the 49 steps leading to it pine entry door. In the 1890’s Scott would run a stage couch to Truckee where he picked up guests arriving by train from San Francisco. In 1900 a post office was established for the resort. In the same year a railroad station was constructed at the corner of Deer Park Road and the Truckee River where the new Lake Tahoe Railway from Truckee to Tahoe City would stop to drop off and pick up guests. Shortly after the turn of the century John Scott died and the resort was sold to Miss Katherine Chandler in 1905 a teacher of botany from San Francisco. She added tennis and croquet grounds to the resort. Other families owned the property in subsequent years, however in 1920 it was foreclosed upon by the San Francisco Board of Trade. After this the property went into a decaying state and was mostly lost to future travelers. John McNutt was the caretaker for the resort until 1909. It was from Deer Park that the trail into the famous Hell Hole was recut by Miss Katherine Chandler in 1908, after having been lost for many years. There has been some talk, recently, of converting Deer Park into a private park. Situated as it is in the heart of a canyon it is readily isolated and thus kept entirely secluded and free from intrusion. While such a procedure would be a great advantage to any individual or club who might purchase the estate, it would be a decided loss to the general public who for so many years have enjoyed the charms and delights of this earliest of Sierran mountain resorts.
Life
Who: Katherine Chandler (died before 1942) and Alice Eastwood (January 19, 1859 - October 30, 1953)
Alice Eastwood was born to Colin Skinner Eastwood and Eliza Jane Gowdey Eastwood on January 19, 1859, in Toronto Canada. The family moved to Denver, Colorado in 1873 and Alice Eastwood went on to graduate as valedictorian from Shawa Convent Catholic High School in 1879. For the next ten years, Eastwood would teach at her alma mater, forgoing a college education. Using Grey’s Manual and the Flora of Colorado, Alice Eastwood would use this time to teach herself botany, going on various collecting trips during her vacations. In 1891, after reviewing Eastwood’s collection in Denver, Mary Katharine Brandegee, Curator of the Botany Department at the California Academy of Sciences, invited Eastwood to assist in the Academy’s Herbarium. This would be the beginning of Alice Eastwood’s long and fruitful career at the Academy of Sciences. The following year, Alice Eastwood would become joint Curator of the Botany Department at the Academy, alongside Mary Katharine Brandegee. Brandegee’s retirement in 1894 resulted in Alice Eastwood becoming the sole Curator and Head of the Botany Department at the Academy. Eastwood completed many trips at this time and collected and discovered a number of plants on the California coast. Against conventional practices of the time, Eastwood segregated type specimens from the main collection. This would prove to be an ingenious practice after the San Francisco 1906 earthquake and fire. After the earthquake, Eastwood went to the Academy and found the building deeply damaged. With the help of Robert Porter, Alice Eastwood was able to save 1,497 type specimens from the impending fire that was devouring the city and that was already burning the neighboring building. The fire would go on to destroy most of the Academy’s collections. Afterwards, Alice Eastwood traveled and studied throughout Europe and the United States. She eventually returned to the Academy as Curator of the Botany Department. She dedicated herself to rebuilding the collection and her expeditions were numerous, including collecting trips to Alaska, Arizona, Baja California, British Columbia, Utah, and all throughout California. By 1942, the collection numbered over 300,000 plant specimens, nearly three times the number destroyed in 1906 earthquake and fire. After 50 years of service to the Academy, Eastwood retired in 1950 at the age of ninety. Her inexhaustible career included the publication of over 300 articles, numerous books, and eight plant species of which were named after her. Along with John Thomas Howell, she founded the journal, Leaflets of Western Botany, served as editor for Zoe, helped to form the American Fuchsia Society, and worked to save a redwood grove in Humboldt County (which was named Alice Eastwood Memorial Grove). And so, at the age 94, on October 30, 1953, Alice Eastwood died in San Francisco, ending a prolific career at the California Academy of Sciences. The Garden of Shakespearean Flowers in Golden Gate Park was originated by Miss Alice Eastwood, botanist of Golden Gate Park, and carried out by the late Miss Katherine Chandler. Chandler credited Alice Eastwood in her “Habits of California Plants”, written in 1903 especially for children, as her teacher. Alice Eastwood died on October 30, 1953, in San Francisco. In spite of her advanced age, she was in good health and lived, independent and alone, in a small cottage until May, 1952, when she fell and broke her hip. Following this accident, she was apparently recovering and in excellent spirits, when in September, 1953, a reaction set in with complications that led to her death. She was buried in Toronto Necropolis (200 Winchester Street, Toronto, ON M4X 1B7, Canada), a XIX-century burial ground featuring Gothic architecture & the tombs of many prominent Torontonians.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: Galeana #441, Chapala Centro, 45900 Chapala, Jal., Mexico (20.28815, -103.19097)
Inn of the Turquoise Bear, Santa Fe, 342 E Buena Vista St, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA (35.67725, -105.93776)
Buried: Hunt Bynner Gravesite, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, USA, Plot: Buried with the ashes of his long time companion Witter Bynner beneath the carved stone weeping dog at the house where he lived on Atalaya Hill in Santa Fe, now used as the president's home for St. John's College
Buried alongside: Witter Bynner

Witter “Hal” Bynner was an American poet, writer and scholar, known for his long residence in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at what was later the Inn of the Turquoise Bear. He moved there in 1922 and he and his partner, Robert Hunt, entertained artists and literary figures such as D.H. Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe, Carl Sandburg, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Igor Stravinsky, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden, Aldous Huxley, Christopher Isherwood, Martha Graham, and Thornton Wilder. He became a friend of D.H. Lawrence, and traveled with him and Frieda Weekley in Mexico; he much later, in 1951, wrote on Lawrence, while he and his partner are portrayed in Lawrence's The Plumed Serpent. In 1972, the Witter Bynner Foundation for Poetry was founded through a bequest from Bynner. It makes grants to perpetuate the art of poetry, primarily by supporting individual poets, translations, and audience development. Since 1997, it has funded the Witter Bynner Fellowship, the recipient of which is selected by the U.S. Poet Laureate. Bynner was buried with the ashes of his longtime companion Robert Hunt beneath a carved stone weeping dog at the house where he lived on Atalaya Hill in Santa Fe, now used as the president's home for St. John's College.
Together from 1922 to 1952: 30 years.
Harold Witter Bynner aka Emanuel Morgan (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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“Here we are, in our own house—a long house with no upstairs—shut in by trees on two sides.—We live on a wide verandah, flowers round—it is fairly hot—I spend the day in trousers and shirt, barefoot—have a Mexican woman, Isabel, to look after us—very nice. Just outside the gate the big Lake of Chapala—40 miles long, 20 miles wide. We can’t see the lake, because the trees shut us in. But we walk out in a wrap to bathe.—There are camions—Ford omnibuses—to Guadalajara—2 hours. Chapala village is small with a market place with trees and Indians in big hats. Also three hotels, because this is a tiny holiday place for Guadalajara. I hope you’ll get down, I’m sure you’d like painting here.—It may be that even yet I’ll have my little hacienda and grow bananas and oranges.” – (letter dated May 3, 1923, to Kai Gotzsche and Knud Merrild, quoted in Knud Merrild’s book, “A Poet and Two Painters: A Memoir of D.H. Lawrence.”)
Address: Calle Zaragoza 307, Chapala Centro, 45900 Chapala, Jal., Mexico (20.28815, -103.19097)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +52 376 765 3653
Place
“Lawrence went to Guadalajara and found a house with a patio on the Lake of Chapala. There, Lawrence began to write his “Plumed Serpent.” He sat by the lake under a pepper tree writing it. The lake was curious with its white water. My enthusiasm for bathing in it faded considerably when one morning a huge snake rose yards high, it seemed to me, only a few feet away. At the end of the patio, we had the family that Lawrence describes in the “Plumed Serpent,” and all the life of Chapala. I tried my one attempt at civilizing those Mexican children, but when they asked me one day, “Do you have lice too, Niña,” I had enough and gave up in a rage. At night I was frightened of bandits and we had one of the sons of the cook sleeping outside our bedroom door with a loaded revolver, but he snored so fiercely that I wasn’t sure whether the fear of bandits wasn’t preferable. We quite sank into the patio life. Bynner and Spud came every afternoon, and I remember Bynner saying to me one day, while he was mixing a cocktail: “If you and Lawrence quarrel, why don’t you hit first?” I took the advice and the next time Lawrence was cross, I rose to the occasion and got out of my Mexican indifference and flew at him.” – (Frieda Lawrence, “Not I, But the Wind…”, (1934)) The house the Lawrences rented was at Zaragoza #4 (since renumbered Zaragoza #307) and became the basis for the description of Kate’s living quarters in “The Plumed Serpent.” The Lawrences lived in the house from the start of May 1923 to about July 9, that year. Interestingly, the house subsequently had several additional links to famous writers and artists. Immediately after the Lawrences departed, the next renters were American artists Everett Gee Jackson and Lowell Houser, who lived there for 18 months. They did not realize the identity of the previous tenant – “an English writer” – until the following year. Their time in Chapala is described, with great wit and charm, in Jackson’s “Burros and Paintbrushes” (1985.) Jackson visited Mexico many times and made several return visits to Chapala, including one in 1968 when he, his wife and young grandson, “rented the charming old Witter Bynner house right in the center of the village of Chapala. It had become the property of Peter Hurd, the artist…” In 1923, Bynner and Johnson stayed at the Hotel Arzapalo. In 1930, Bynner bought a home in Chapala (not the one rented by Lawrence) and was a frequent winter visitor for many years. Over the years, the house on Zaragoza that Lawrence and Frieda had occupied was extensively remodeled and expanded. The first major renovation was undertaken in about 1940 by famed Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Another large-scale renovation took place after the house was acquired in 1954 by American artist and architect Roy MacNicol. In the late 1970s, Canadian poet Al Purdy, a great admirer of Lawrence (to the point of having a bust of Lawrence on the hall table of his home in Ontario), wrote a hand-signed and numbered book, The D.H. Lawrence House at Chapala, published by The Paget Press in 1980, as a limited edition of 44 copies. The book includes a photograph, taken by Purdy’s wife Eurithe, of the plumed serpent tile work above the door of the Lawrence house. The town of Chapala today would be totally unrecognizable to Lawrence, but the home where he spent a productive summer writing the first draft of “The Plumed Serpent” eventually became the Quinta Quetzalcoatl, an exclusive boutique hotel.
Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) aka D.H. Lawrence
D. H. Lawrence, together with his wife Frieda, and friends Witter Bynner and Willard (“Spud”) Johnson, visited Mexico in March 1923, initially staying in Mexico City. By the end of April, Lawrence was becoming restless and actively looking for somewhere where he could write. The traveling party had an open invitation to visit Guadalajara, the home of Idella Purnell, a former student of Bynner’s at the Univeristy of California, Berkeley. After reading about Chapala in Terry’s “Guide to Mexico,” Lawrence decided to catch the train to Guadalajara and then explore the lakeside village of Chapala for himself. Lawrence liked what he saw and, within hours of arriving in Chapala, he sent an urgent telegram back to Mexico City pronouncing Chapala “paradise” and urging the others to join him there immediately. Lawrence and his wife Frieda soon established their home for the summer in Chapala, on Calle Zaragoza. In a letter back to two Danish friends in Taos, Lawrence described both the house and the village. Life was not without its incidents and travails. Frieda, especially, was unconvinced about the charms of Chapala. Instead Witter Bynner and Robert Hunt made frequent visits to a second home in Chapala, Mexico. Their home (on the square at Galeana #441, the street name was later changed to Francisco I. Madero) was purchased from Mexican architect Luis Barragán in 1940 and was on the town’s plaza, a short distance from the lake. Hunt restored the house and, in 1943, added an extensive, rooftop terrace, which had clear views of Lake Chapala and near-by mountains. It became Bynner and Hunt’s winter home. Bynner spent much of the 1940s and early 1950s there, until he began to lose his eyesight. He returned to the USA, received treatment, and traveled to Europe with Hunt, who by the late 1950s and early 1960s took increasing responsibility for the ailing poet. Upon Bynner’s death, John Liggett Meigs and Peter Hurd, together, purchased Bynner’s house in Chapala. Along with the house, Bynner had included its content in the transfer of ownership. John described there being only four buildings on the block where the house was, and said that the house had two floors, the rooftop terrace that Hunt had added, and a “tower” overlooking Lake Chapala. The other buildings on the block included a “wonderful cantina,” which became a supermarket; another two-story house, next door, with a high wall between that house and Bynner’s house’s courtyard; and a two-story hotel on the corner. However, after John and Hurd bought Bynner’s house, they discovered that the owners of the hotel had sold the airspace over the hotel, and, one time, when John arrived, he discovered a twenty foot by forty foot “President Brandy” advertisement sign on top of the hotel, blocking his view of the lake. John said that was when he and Hurd decided to sell the place.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Inn of the Turquoise Bear occupies the home of Witter Bynner, who for almost 50 years was a prominent citizen of Santa Fe, actively participating in the cultural, artistic, and political life of the city.
Address: 342 E Buena Vista St, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA (35.67725, -105.93776)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 505-983-0798
Place
Noted as a poet, translator and essayist, Witter Bynner was a staunch advocate of human rights, especially of Native Americans, women, and other minorities. Bynner created his rambling adobe villa, constructed in Spanish-Pueblo Revival style, from a core of rooms that date to the early XIX century. It is now considered one of Santa Fe’s most important historical estates. With its signature portico, towering pine trees, magnificent rock terraces, and lush gardens filled with lilacs, wild roses, and other flowers, the Inn offers guests a bucolic retreat close to the center of Santa Fe. Bynner and Robert Hunt, his companion of almost 40 years, were famous – or infamous – for the riotous parties they hosted in this estate, referred to by Ansel Adams as “Bynner’s bashes.” Their home was regarded as the center for the gathering of the creative and fun loving elite of Santa Fe and visitors from New York and around the world. The celebrity guest list of Bynner included D.H. Lawrence (who spent his first night in an American home in this villa), Willa Cather, Ansel Adams, Igor Stravinsky, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden, Stephen Spender, Aldous Huxley, Clara Bow, Errol Flynn, Rita Hayworth, Lynn Riggs, Christopher Isherwood, Carl Van Vechten, Martha Graham, Robert Oppenheimer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Austin, Willard Nash, Thornton Wilder, J.B. Priestly – and many others. Upon Witter’s death, he willed the estate to St. John’s College in Santa Fe who used the estate as a residence hall for a number of years. In September, 2014 the estate was once again filled with “Johnnies” celebrating their 35th reunion at “Witter Bynner” a place they once called home. In 1996, Ralph Bolton & Robert Frost, purchased the estate and created a wonderful Santa Fe bed and breakfast. The estate has not been altered in any significant way retaining its authentic Northern New Mexico charm. One can still see scant reminders of the Chinese decoration that Witter used to distinguish it. In April, 2014 Dan Clark & David Solem acquired the Inn. Their goals – as innkeepers and as stewards of the estate and land that Bynner loved – are to rekindle the comfort, creativity and hospitality for which this home was renowned in the past, to protect, restore and extend the legacy of its famous creator, and to provide guests with a unique, restorative experience that captures the essence of Santa Fe’s past and present.
Life
Who: Harold Witter Bynner (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968) aka Emanuel Morgan
Witter Bynner was a poet, writer and scholar, known for his long residence in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and association with other literary figures there. In June 1922 Bynner moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Mabel Dodge Luhan introduced them to D.H. Lawrence and his wife Frieda, and Bynner and his former student Walter Willard “Spud” Johnson (and lover) joined the Lawrences on a trip through Mexico in 1923. The trip led to several Lawrence essays and his novel “The Plumed Serpent,” including characters based on Bynner and Johnson. Bynner ‘s related writings include three poems about Lawrence, and “Journey with Genius,” a memoir published in 1951. Mabel Dodge Luhan was not pleased about their trip, and she is said to have taken revenge on Bynner by hiring Johnson to be her own secretary. Bynner in turn wrote a play, “Cake,” satirizing her lifestyle. In 1930 Robert "Bob" Hunt arrived, originally for a visit while recuperating from an illness, but he stayed on as Bynner’s lifelong companion. They also made frequent visits to a second home in Chapala, Mexico. The home was purchased from Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Bynner spent much of the 1940s and early 1950s there, until he began to lose his eyesight. He returned to the U.S., received treatment, and traveled to Europe with Hunt, who by the late 1950s and early 1960s took increasing responsibility for the ailing poet. Hunt died of a heart attack in January 1964. On January 18, 1965, Bynner had a severe stroke. He never recovered, and required constant care until he died on June 1, 1968. Witter Bynner and Robert Hunt’s ashes were buried beneath a carved stone weeping dog at the house where they lived on Atalaya Hill in Santa Fe.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Buried: Langesund Cemetery, Langesund, Bamble commune, Telemark fylke, Norway

Charles Henri Ford died in 2002. He was survived by his elder sister, actress Ruth Ford, who died in 2009. Upon her death, Ruth Ford left the apartments she owned in the historic Dakota Building on the Upper West Side to Indra Tamang, Charles Henri Ford’s caretaker, along with a valuable Russian surrealist art collection, making him a millionaire.
Address: 1 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77652, -73.97614)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +1 212-362-1448
National Register of Historic Places: 72000869, 1972 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built between 1880 and 1884, Design by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (1847-1918)
The Dakota (also known as Dakota Apartments) is a cooperative apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is famous as the home of former Beatle John Lennon from 1973 to 1980, as well as the location of his murder. The Dakota is considered to be one of Manhattan’s most prestigious and exclusive cooperative residential buildings, with apartments generally selling for between $4 million and $30 million. Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel. The Dakota was purportedly so named because at the time of construction, the Upper West Side was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote in relation to the inhabited area of Manhattan as the Dakota Territory was. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota’s long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray’s book “New York Streetscapes”: "Probably it was called “Dakota” because it was so far west and so far north.” According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark’s fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. Beginning in 2013, the Dakota’s facade was being renovated. In the 1970s, the co-op board refused to admit playwright Mart Crowley, who wrote "The Boys in the Band," apparently because Crowley was an out gay man.
Notable queer residents at The Dakota Building:
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. Arthur Laurents (Bernstein’s collaborator in “West Side Story”) said that Bernstein was "a gay man who got married. He wasn’t conflicted about it at all. He was just gay."
• Bob Crewe (1930-2014), songwriter, record producer, artist. Crewe was portrayed as "overtly gay" in "Jersey Boys,” but his brother Dan told The New York Times he was discreet about his sexuality, particularly during the time he was working with the Four Seasons. "Whenever he met someone, he would go into what I always called his John Wayne mode, this extreme machoism."
• Charles Henri Ford (1908–2002), poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his editorship of the Surrealist magazine View (1940–1947) in New York City, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew. Ford is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery (Brookhaven, MS 39601).
• Judy Garland (1922-1969), actress. Garland had a large fan base in the gay community and became a gay icon. Reasons given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. In the 1960s, a reporter asked how she felt about having a large gay following. She replied, "I couldn’t care less. I sing to people."
• Judy Holliday (1921-1965), actress, comedian, and singer, she was a resident of the Dakota for many years. She inhabited apartment #77 until her death from breast cancer at age 43 on June 7, 1965. She is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.
• William Inge (1913-1973), playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. “The Last Pad” is one of three of Inge’s plays that either have openly gay characters or address homosexuality directly. “The Boy in the Basement,” a one-act play written in the early 1950s, but not published until 1962, is his only play that addresses homosexuality overtly, while Archie in “The Last Pad” and Pinky in “Where’s Daddy?” (1966) are gay characters. Inge himself was closeted. Inge is buried at Mt Hope Cemetery (Independence, KS 67301).
• Carson McCullers (1917-1967), novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Among her friends were W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams.
• Rudolf Nureyev (1938-1993), dancer. Depending on the source, Nureyev is described as either bisexual as he did have heterosexual relationships as a younger man, or gay. Nureyev met Erik Bruhn, the celebrated Danish dancer, after Nureyev defected to the West in 1961. Bruhn and Nureyev became a couple and the two remained together off and on, with a very volatile relationship for 25 years, until Bruhn’s death in 1986. Nureyev’s grave is at a Russian cemetery in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois near Paris.
Who: Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) and Lorentz Severin Skougaard (March 10, 1887 – January 18, 1965)
Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) was an American heir and philanthropist. His father, Edward Cabot Clark (1811–1882) was an American businessman and lawyer, founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company, along with his business partner Isaac Merritt Singer. Together, they began investing in real estate in the 1870s. They built The Dakota. Determined to escape from his family Alfred Corning Clark went abroad and studied the piano in Milan. He confessed later to an intimate companion, that away from home he felt free “to worship at the shrine of friendship.” Among these friends, all male, was Lorentz Severin Skougaard, a young Norwegian tenor whom he met in Paris. It became an all-consuming relationship that lasted until Lorentz’s death nineteen years later. Although Alfred did the right thing by marrying and siring four sons, he did not give up the private half of his life. Summers he sent his family to the country— to a large farm he owned in Cooperstown, New York, his mother’s birthplace. While they enjoyed the fresh air, he continued his travels in Europe: France, Italy, and Norway, this time with Lorentz. And becoming bolder after his father’s death, he bought Lorentz a house in New York almost next door to the house where he lived with his wife and children. When Lorentz died he commissioned a marble memorial from George Grey Barnard, a handsome young indigent American sculptor he picked up in Paris. Brotherly Love is a highly erotic work showing two muscular athletic naked men with broad shoulders, triangular torsos, perfect buttocks, and powerful legs, groping toward each other: a perfect metaphor for Alfred and Lorentz and their love. After Alfred’s death Barnard, now rich, famous, and the toast of New York and Paris, thanks to his patron’s munificence, helped Alfred’s sons Sterling and Stephen Clark build their collections of art, now the glory of three museums: the Metropolitan and the Modern in New York, and the Sterling and Francine Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Leonor Fini was an Argentine surrealist painter, designer, illustrator, and author, known for her depictions of powerful women.
Born: August 30, 1907, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Died: January 18, 1996, Paris, France
Spouse: Federico Veneziani (m. ?–1941)
Parents: Malvina Braun
Period: Surrealism
Artwork: Self Portrait with Scorpion, La toilette inutile, more

Leonor Fini was an Argentine surrealist painter. Fini married only once, for a brief period, to Fedrico Veneziani. They were divorced after she met the Italian Count, Stanislao Lepri, who abandoned his diplomatic career shortly after meeting Fini and lived with her thereafter. She met the Polish writer Konstanty Jeleński, known as Kot, in Paris right after the war. She was delighted to discover that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Sforzino Sforza, who had been one of her most favorite lovers. Kot joined Fini and Lepri in their Paris apartment in 1952 and the three remained inseparable until their deaths. She later employed an assistant to join the household, which he described as "a little bit of prison and a lot of theatre". One of his jobs was to look after her beloved Persian cats. Over the years, she acquired 17 of them; they shared her bed and, at mealtimes, were allowed to roam the dining-table selecting tasty morsels - and woe betide the guest who complained.
Together from 1952 to 1980: 28 years.
Konstanty Jeleński (January 2, 1922 - May 4, 1987)
Leonor Fini (August 30, 1907 – January 18, 1996)
Count Stanislao Lepri (1905 - 1980)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Lived: Mottistone Manor, Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Buried: Little Cloisters, Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England (memorial)

Mottistone Manor is a National Trust property in the village of Mottistone on the Isle of Wight. It has popular gardens and is a listed building. It was first mentioned in documents related to the Domesday Book.
Address: Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1983 741020
Place
The oldest parts of the manor, the south-east wing, date from the XV or early XVI century. The north-west wing was added or remodelled by Thomas Cheke in 1567, and additions to the south-east wing were made in the early XVII century. The whole house was remodelled in the 1920s by the architects Seely and Paget, Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963) of the firm being a great-grandson of Charles Seely (1803–1887), who had bought the house and estate in 1861. Though not open to the public, the manor has hosted gatherings for the Seely family. The great-great granddaughter of General J. E. B. Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, the theatre and opera director Sophie Hunter, held her wedding reception here with Benedict Cumberbatch on February 14, 2015.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963)
'The Shack' is a small caravan in the grounds of Mottistone Manor in which the Hon. John Seeley and Paul Paget spent weekends. Seeley later inherited the title Lord Mottistone. The pair were founders of an architectural practice that flourished from the 1920s to the 1960s as Seeley & Paget. The firm is best known for their church architecture and the business partners were also life partners. Entertaining lavishly at Mottistone Manor the pair retreated at night to The Shack where they slept in bunks at either end of their tiny space - while guests relaxed in the more comfortable rooms of the Manor. This sleeping arrangement enabled them to avoid accusations of a sexual relationship when necessary. The interior of the The Shack was designed by the architects in chrome and plywood in the Modern movement style - while the outside is more rustic. Though small inside, there were luxuries such as heated chromed steel pipes formed into a ladder up to the bunk beds so they went to bed with warm feet. The Manor is in private ownership but the National Trust now admits visitors to The Shack as part of visits to the Mottistone estate and gardens. John Seely and Paul Paget also designed Eltham Palace, which hosted “The Queens of Eltham Palace” event for LGBT History Month 2012.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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There are three original gardens within Westminster Abbey: the Garth, the Little Cloister and College Garden. St Catherine's Garden lies in the area of the ruined monastery and was more recently created. Each Garden had a separate function: the Garth with its square of turf, bounded by Cloisters, gave the monks somewhere to rest their eyes and minds as they walked around it. Metaphysically speaking, green was symbolic of rebirth, and therefore appropriate for spiritual refreshment.
Address: Westminster, London SW1P 3PJ, UK (51.49828, -0.12756)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Place
The Little Cloister Garden with its fountain and borders of scented plants was an area set aside for recuperation after illness. There would have probably been seats in this garden, and may have well been turf-topped ones, which were common in medieval times. The College Garden was the Infirmarer's Garden, used for the purposes of growing medicinal herbs and foods for the general well-being of the occupants of the Abbey. It is very unusual (possibly unique in England) for an Abbey or Monastery to still have its infirmarer's garden attached and kept as a garden. The Infirmary Garden originally contained an orchard (hence the name of the nearby Abbey Orchard Street). Though the orchard would have grown apples, pears, plums, figs, mulberries, nuts, medlars and vines, it did not exist merely to provide food. It was also an area of beauty, neatly laid out with plentiful paths and containing roses and lilies. This area was also known as the Cemetery Orchard for the monks were buried there. Symbolically, life and death were dovetailed in this garden. Vegetables such as broad beans, leeks, onions, garlic, coleworts (kale) and root vegetables were grown in a separate plot. There were also fishponds, beehives, and an area for growing medicinal herbs. The value of herbs to medieval people cannot be overestimated. Their bland vegetable and starch diet needed herbal flavouring to make it palatable. Herbs had enormous symbolic meaning, many being named after the Virgin Mary such as 'Lady's Bedstraw', Galium verum. Illnesses were treated by diet, blood-letting, and the application of herbs - surgery was only attempted in cases of direst need. The Gardens were tended by a Head Gardener and two undergardeners. They were monks and expected to attend matins and compline, though they were asked to leave their muddy boots and capes outside. In addition to providing the Abbey with food, the Gardener also gave away fruit from the orchard to local people on 25th July every year, St James' Day. Up to 1300, England had a Mediterranean climate, ideal for fruit growing, and especially vines and wine making. After this the weather became cool and damp. The Gardener had one day off a year, called his 'O' Day. He could choose when he wanted to take it, and the other monks gave money for him to spend on his special day. College Garden has been in cultivation for over 900 years. The oldest surviving feature that can be seen today is the stone precinct wall, built in 1376, at the far end and on the east side. The XVIII century Westminster School dormitory on the west side was designed by the Earl of Burlington. Four rather decayed statues of saints in the garden came originally from an altarpiece of 1686 and were carved by Arnold Quellin. The tall plane trees were planted in 1850. In 1993 a bronze sculpture of the Crucifixion by Enzo Plazzotta was presented and is at the south end of the garden. Nearby is a single water jet fountain installed in 2002.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Lord Mottistone (May 1, 1899 – January 18, 1963) and Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)
John Seely, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. They also re-built the Deanery which had been blitzed in 1941. In a niche in the wall of one of these clergy houses overlooking St Catherine's chapel garden is a fibreglass statue of St Catherine by Edwin Russell which forms a memorial to Lord Mottistone. The Latin on the plaque below, which is flanked by two seahorses, can be translated: "John Mottistone. This is a sign of love and sadness. P.E.P. 1966 A.C.D." The initials are those of his partner Paul Edward Paget and the Dean of Westminster at that time, Alan Campbell Don. The statue was unveiled on 25 November 1966. He was a son of John Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, politician, and his wife Emily. After education at Harrow School and Cambridge he served in WWI. A brother was killed at Arras in 1917. During WWII he served in the Auxiliary Air Force and at the Ministry of Works. In 1947 he succeeded to his father's title. He was Surveyor to the Fabric at St Paul's Cathedral, architect to St George's chapel, Windsor Castle and a Lay Canon and architect at Portsmouth cathedral. Among the other buildings Seely & Paget restored after war damage were Lambeth Palace, Eton College and many London churches. He died on January 18, 1963 and was succeeded in the title by his brother Arthur. The statue is in a private garden but can be seen through the door of St Catherine's chapel when the Little Cloister is open to the public Tuesdays-Thursdays. The gardens of his residence on the Isle of Wight, in Mottistone village, are open to the public.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Gladys Alberta Bentley was an American blues singer, pianist and entertainer during the Harlem Renaissance.
Born: August 12, 1907, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 18, 1960, Los Angeles, California, United States
Genre: Blues
Record label: Suncoast Music
Albums: Ground Hog Blues
Buried: Lincoln Memorial Park, Carson, Los Angeles County, California, USA

Gladys Bentley (1907-1960), one of the most flamboyant blues entertainers of the XX century, began performing in New York City as a singer and male impersonator. Bentley was known for being open about her lesbianism, and incorporated it into her stage show. In the years prior to her death, she adamantly tried to recant her lesbianism and married a man several years her junior. Bentley became an active member of the "Temple of Love In Christ" Church and was on her way to becoming an ordained minister at the time of her death from pneumonia at the age of 52. She is buried at Lincoln Memorial Park (Carson, CA 90746).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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David Daniel Kaminsky, better known by his screen name Danny Kaye, was an American actor, singer, dancer, comedian, and musician. His performances featured physical comedy, idiosyncratic pantomimes, and rapid-fire novelty songs.
Born: January 18, 1911, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 3, 1987, Los Angeles, California, United States
Height: 1.8 m
TV shows: The Danny Kaye Show, Live from Lincoln Center
Studied: Thomas Jefferson High School
Buried: Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, Westchester County, New York, USA

Bertram Ross and John Wallowitch are buried together at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, New York, Actors Fund Lot.
Address: 273 Lakeview Ave, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA (41.08328, -73.78491)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00, Saturday and Sunday 9.00-16.00
Phone: +1 914-949-0347
Place
Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York, was founded in 1889, when many New York City cemeteries were becoming full, and rural cemeteries were being created near the railroads that served the city. Initially 250 acres (1.0 km2), it was expanded to 600 acres (2.4 km²) in 1905, but reduced to 461 acres (1.9 km²) in 1912, when a portion was sold to the neighboring Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Several baseball players are buried in this cemetery. Also many entertainment figures of the early XX century, including the Russian-born Sergei Rachmaninoff, were buried here. The cemetery has a special section for members of the Actors’ Fund of America and the National Vaudeville Association, some of whom died in abject poverty. Sharon Gardens is a 76-acre (31 ha) section of Kensico Cemetery, which was created in 1953 for Jewish burials.
Notable queer burials at Kensico Cemetery:
• Robert De Niro, Sr. (1922-1993), artist, father of actor Robert De Niro. De Niro Sr. lived openly as a gay man in his last years.
• Danny Kaye (1913–1987), comedic actor. Rumored to have been Laurence Olivier’s lover.
• Bertram Ross (November 14, 1920 – April 20, 2003), dancer best known for his work with the Martha Graham Dance Company, with which he performed for two decades. After leaving Graham’s company, Ross taught, choreographed and formed his own dance company. In later life, he toured in a cabaret duo with his real life partner, the composer and pianist John Wallowitch.
• John Wallowitch (February 11, 1926 – August 15, 2007), songwriter and cabaret performer. He wrote over 2,000 songs. For over 50 years he played and sang a catalogue of original songs at nightspots around New York City. His brother was photographer Edward Wallowitch, an associate of Andy Warhol.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4974668.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE was an English fashion, portrait and war photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award–winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre.
Born: January 14, 1904, Hampstead, United Kingdom
Died: January 18, 1980, Broad Chalke, United Kingdom
Awards: Academy Award for Best Costume Design, more
Siblings: Nancy Beaton, Barbara Beaton, Reginald Beaton
Lived: Reddish House, South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Ashcombe House, Cranborne Chase, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Studied: St John's College, Cambridge
Harrow School
St Cyprian's School
Buried: All Saints, South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH

Ashcombe House, also known as Ashcombe Park, is a Georgian manor house, set in 1,134 acres (4.59 km2) of land, on Cranborne Chase, in the parish of Berwick St John, near Salisbury, in Wiltshire. The house is about equidistant between the villages of Berwick St John and Tollard Royal.
Address: Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320267 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
There have been several buildings on the site. The first house was built in 1686 by a local squire, Robert Barber. Only some fifty years later, in 1740, the Barber family entirely demolished the 1686 house and rebuilt on the site. In 1750 Anne Wyndham inherited the house. The next year she married the Hon. James Everard Arundell, third son of the 6th Baron Arundell of Wardour. In 1754 the architect Francis Cartwright largely remodelled the interior of the house for the Arundells. In 1815 the Ashcombe Estate was purchased from Lady Arundell by Thomas Grove the younger of Ferne House for £8,700. Thomas Grove’s grandson Sir Walter demolished most of the 1740 house in around 1870. Sir Walter later sold Ashcombe House to the 13th Duke of Hamilton, who in turn sold Ashcombe to Mr R. W. Borley of Shaftesbury after WWI. The current Ashcombe House was originally part of the much larger mid-XVIII century structure, and is an L-shaped three-bay survival of the eastern wing. There is a five-bay orangery close to the house.
Life
Who: Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE (January 14, 1904 – January 18, 1980)
The photographer and designer Cecil Beaton first visited the house in 1930, taken there by the sculptor Stephen Tomlin together with the writer Edith Olivier. He was later to write of his first impression of the house, as he approached it through the arch of the gatehouse: “None of us uttered a word as we came under the vaulted ceiling and stood before a small, compact house of lilac-coloured brick. We inhaled sensuously the strange, haunting - and rather haunted - atmosphere of the place ... I was almost numbed by my first encounter with the house. It was as if I had been touched on the head by some magic wand.” That same year Mr Borley leased Ashcombe House to Beaton for £50 a year, a very small rent, on the condition that Beaton would make improvements to the house, which was all-but derelict. Beaton employed the Austrian architect Michael Rosenauer to make substantial alterations to the material of the house, including a passageway through the house to unite the front and the back, and elongating the windows. Plumbing and electricity were installed. The artist Rex Whistler designed the Palladian front door surround, with its pineapple made from Bath stone. Urns were positioned on the roof and the orangery was converted into Beaton’s studio. Beaton entertained lavishly at Ashcombe House, and his houseguests included many notable people of the time, including actors and artists such as Tallulah Bankhead, Diana Cooper, Ruth Ford and Lord Berners. Artists Whistler, Salvador Dalí, Christian Bérard and Augustus John and stage designer Oliver Messel painted murals in the house, and Dalí used it as the backdrop of one of his paintings. Little remains of the Beaton-era interior design, although in the "circus room,” which once contained a Whister-designed bed shaped like a carousel, one mural of a lady on a circus horse remains, painted during a hectic weekend party when all guests wielded paintbrushes. Beaton’s lease expired in 1945, and he was heartbroken to be forced to leave the house: his biographer Hugo Vickers has stated that Beaton never got over the loss of Ashcombe. Beaton detailed his life at the house in his book “Ashcombe: The Story of a Fifteen-Year Lease,” first published in 1949 by B. T. Batsford. The dustjacket of the first edition of the book featured a painting by Whistler, with the orangery on the left of the painting (on the back cover) and Ashcombe House itself to the right, on the front cover; this image has been reproduced on the cover of the 1999 publication of the book. In 1948 Beaton designed a fabric, which is still available, which he named "Ashcombe Stripe" after Ashcombe House. Right up until his death in 1980 Beaton owned a late XVIII century painting of the house, thought to have been painted around 1770. It is now held at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum in Salisbury, Wiltshire, bought from a sale of Beaton’s collections held by Christie’s auctioneers. Beaton’s landlord, Hugh Borley, R. W. Borley’s son, lived in the house from 1946 until his death in 1993. He grew increasingly eccentric and resented the fame which Beaton’s book had brought to the house, refusing all offers to sell it and chasing off sight-seers with dogs or threatening them with guns. Shortly before Borley’s death, the house was sold in a private sale, to David and Toni Parkes, who set about restoring the house. They were friends with the director of the Dovecote Press, which republished Beaton’s book on Ashcombe on its fiftieth anniversary in 1999, and so a special launch party was held at the house. When the house came up for sale in 2001, the first time it had been on the open market since just after WWI, there was a great deal of interest. Madonna and Guy Ritchie were the successful purchasers, after they were told by Hugo Vickers, Beaton’s biographer, of its being up for sale.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Society photographer and artist Sir Cecil Beaton bought Reddish house in 1947 and transformed the interior. Beaton added rooms on the eastern side, extended the parlour southwards, and introduced many new fittings. Greta Garbo was a frequent visitor. The upper floor had been equipped for illegal cock-fighting at the beginning of the XX century but Beaton used the cages as wardrobes to store the oscar-winning costumes from his set design of “My Fair Lady.” He remained at the house until his death in 1980 and is buried in the churchyard at All Saints (South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH).
Address: South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320692 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Reddish House, also known as Reddish Manor, in the village of Broad Chalke in Wiltshire, England, is an early XVIII-century manor house possibly built in its current form for Jeremiah Cray, a clothier. Whilst the history of the property can be traced to the early XVI century, the house as it currently stands appears to have been developed in the early XVIII century, when owned by a series of three absentee landlords all sharing the name Jeremiah Clay. The construction and design appear to show a melange of influences of the architectural styles favoured during the reigns of Charles II (1660–1685); William and Mary (1689–1702); and Queen Anne (1702–1714). In the XX century the house was inhabited by Norah Young until 1918, and by Major C.A. Wells until 1929 when it was purchased by R.W. Williamson to amalgamate the 100 acres into the neighbouring Knowle farm. In 1935 Claude Williamson sold the house and its 2.5 acre gardens to Dr. Lucius Wood and his wife Clare who lived there from 1935 until 1947, running his General Practice and dentistry. Their son, the artist Christopher Wood is buried in the village churchyard; his headstone was carved by Eric Gill. In 1980 Ursula Henderson bought the house from the estate of Cecil Beaton and lived there until 1987 when she moved to the neighbouring village of Bishopstone before her death in 1989. She was born Ursula von Pannwitz and was once styled Countess of Chichester from her first marriage to John Pelham, 8th Earl of Chichester who died on active service in 1944. The house was owned and extensively renovated by musicians Robert Fripp and Toyah Willcox from Dec. 1987 until July 1999.
Life
Who: John Christopher Wood (April 7, 1901 – August 21, 1930), aka Kit Wood
Christopher Wood was an English painter born in Knowsley, near Liverpool. At Liverpool University, Wood met Augustus John, who encouraged him to be a painter. The French collector Alphonse Kahn invited him to Paris in 1920. From 1921 he trained as a painter at the Academie Julian in Paris, where he met Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Georges Auric and Diaghilev. Wood was bisexual. In the early summer of 1921, Wood met Antonio de Gandarillas, a Chilean diplomat. Gandarillas, a married homosexual fourteen years older than Wood, lived a glamorous life partly financed by gambling. Their relationship lasted through Wood's life, surviving his affair with Jeanne Bourgoint. In 1927 his plans to elope and marry heiress Meraud Guinness were frustrated by her parents whereupon he required emotional support from Winifred Nicholson. (Meraud went on to marry Alvaro Guevara in 1929.) Wood also had a liaison with a Russian émigrée, Frosca Munster, whom he met in 1928. By 1930, addicted to opium and painting frenetically in preparation for his Wertheim exhibition in London, he suffered paranoia and began carrying a revolver. On August 21 he travelled to meet his mother and sister for lunch at 'The County Hotel' in Salisbury and to show them a selection of his latest paintings. After saying goodbye he jumped under a train at Salisbury railway station, although in deference to his mother's wishes it was reported as an accident.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Chester Simon Kallman was an American poet, librettist, and translator, best known for his collaborations with W. H. Auden and Igor Stravinsky.
Born: January 7, 1921, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 18, 1975
Books: W.H. Auden and Chester Kallman: Libretti and Other Dramatic Writings by W.H. Auden, 1939-1973, more
Education: Brooklyn College
University of Michigan
Libretti: The Rake's Progress, Elegy for Young Lovers, The Bassarids, The Visitors, Love's Labour's Lost
Lived: 77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)

Wystan Hugh Auden, who published as W.H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many critics as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievement, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety in tone, form and content. In 1939, at the Yorkville apartment on 81st St in NYC, two days after a League of American Writers reading, Auden met the poet Chester Kallman, who became his lover for the next two years (Auden described their relationship as a "marriage" that began with a cross-country "honeymoon" journey). In August 1941, Kallman ended their sexual relationship because he could not accept Auden's insistence on a mutual faithfulness, but he and Auden remained companions, sharing houses and apartments from 1953 until Auden's death. Kallman died less than two years after Auden, seemingly of a broken heart.
Together from 1939 to 1973: 34 years.
Chester Simon Kallman (January 7, 1921 – January 17, 1975)
W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
Anniversary: April 8, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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8th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs from Sixth Avenue to Third Avenue, and Avenue B to Avenue D; its addresses switch from West to East as it crosses Fifth Avenue. Between Third Avenue and Avenue A, it is named St. Mark’s Place, after the nearby St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery on 10th Street at Second Avenue.
Address: 77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)
Type: Private Property
Place
St. Mark’s Place is considered a main cultural street for the East Village. Vehicular traffic runs east along both one-way streets. St. Mark’s Place features a wide variety of retailers. Venerable institutions lining St. Mark’s Place include Gem Spa, Yaffa Café, the St. Mark’s Hotel, St. Mark’s Comics, and Trash and Vaudeville. There are several open front markets that sell sunglasses, clothing and jewelry. There are also a number of restaurants and bars, as well as several record stores. Wouter van Twiller, colonial governor of New Amsterdam, once owned a tobacco farm near 8th and Macdougal Streets. Such farms were located around the area until the 1830s. Nearby, a Native American trail crossed the island via the right-of-ways of Greenwich Avenue, Astor Place, and Stuyvesant Street. Under the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, a city grid for much of Manhattan was defined. Eighth Street was to run from Sixth Avenue in the west to Third Avenue and the Bowery to the east. The area west of Sixth Avenue was already developed as Greenwich Village. Mercer, Greene, Wooster, Thompson Street, Sullivan Street, and Macdougal Streets, as well as Laurens Street (present-day LaGuardia Place), extended to Eighth Street until the 1820s, when the construction of Washington Square Park severed Laurens, Thompson, and Sullivan Streets south of 4th Street. After the Commissioners’ Plan was laid out, property along the street’s right of way quickly developed. By 1835, the New York University opened its first building, the Silver Center, along Eighth Street near the Washington Square Park. Row houses were also built on Eighth Street. The street ran between the Jefferson Market, built in 1832 at the west end, and the Tompkins Market, built in 1836, at the east end. These were factors in the street’s commercialization in later years. Eighth Street was supposed to extend to a market place at Avenue C, but since that idea never came to fruition. Capitalizing on the high-class status of Bond, Bleecker, Great Jones, and Lafayette Streets in NoHo, developer Thomas E. Davis developed the east end of the street and renamed it "St. Mark’s Place.” Davis built up St. Mark’s Place between Third and Second Avenues between 1831 and 1832. Although the original plan was for Federal homes, only three such houses remained in 2014.
Notable queer residents at St. Marks Place:
• No. 33: Home to poet Anne Waldman in the late 1960s/mid-1970s. In 1977, the storefront was occupied by Manic Panic, the first U.S. boutique to sell punk rock attire, which developed its own line of make-up and vibrant hair dyes; notable patrons have included performers David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper, Debbie Harry, and Joey Ramone.
• No. 51: In the early 1980s, this was home to 51X, a gallery that featured graffiti art, representing artists such as Keith Haring, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.
• No. 57: Club 57 was an important art and performance space in the late 1970s and early 1980s; notable people, such as Ann Magnuson, Keith Haring, Klaus Nomi, John Sex, Kenny Scharf, David Wojnarowicz, Wendy Wild, The Fleshtones, and Fab Five Freddy, performed or showed there.
• No. 75: The Holiday Cocktail Lounge has had a range of visitors including W.H. Auden, Allen Ginsberg and other Beat writers, Shelley Winters, and Frank Sinatra, whose agent lived in the neighborhood.
• No. 77: Home to W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 –September 29, 1973) for almost 20 years, from 1953 to 1972. Born in England, the poet Wystan Hugh Auden, arrived in New York City in 1939. After stints at the George Washington Hotel on East 23rd Street and in Brooklyn Heights, he and companion Chester Kallman settled into a second-floor apartment at this location. His living quarters were described as being so cold that the toilet no longer functioned and he had to use the toilet in the liquor store at the corner. Auden is regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the XX century. The building now houses a restaurant, La Palapa. The basement of this building was the location where the newspaper Novy Mir ("New World" or "New Peace"), a Russian-language Communist paper, was founded in 1916. It was edited by Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin, and Leon Trotsky worked there; the paper stopped publishing after the Russian Revolution of October, 1917.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cary Grant was a British-American actor, known as one of classic Hollywood's definitive leading men.
Born: January 18, 1904, Horfield, Bristol, United Kingdom
Died: November 29, 1986, Davenport, Iowa, United States
Full name: Archibald Alexander Leach
Spouse: Barbara Harris (m. 1981–1986), more
Lived: The Savoy Hotel, Strand, WC2R
15 Hughenden Road, Bristol
Warwick New York Hotel, 65 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76253, -73.97816)
75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
796 Via Miraleste, Palm Springs
928 Avenida Las Palmas, Palm Springs
Studied: Fairfield Grammar School
Bishop Road Primary School

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. They met in 1932 when they were cast together in Hot Saturday. They lived together for many years in Los Angeles. Their home was featured in an issue of Architectural Digest that showed legendary Hollywood stars at home. After that, the house was dabbed “Bachelor Hall” (recently sold in 2006 for more or less 4 million dollars.) They both married but remained close ever afterward. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters. Scott died little more than 3 months after Grant.
They met in 1932 and remained friends until Grant’s death in 1986: 54 years.
Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986)
Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cary Grant, the star of films such as “North by Northwest” and “Bringing up Baby” was born at 15 Hughenden Road, Bristol, on January 18, 1904.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Savoy Hotel (Strand, WC2R) is a luxury hotel in central London. Built by the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte with profits from his Gilbert and Sullivan opera productions, it opened on August 6, 1889. It was the first in the Savoy group of hotels and restaurants owned by Carte's family for over a century. The Savoy was the first luxury hotel in Britain, introducing electric lights throughout the building, electric lifts, bathrooms in most of the lavishly furnished rooms, constant hot and cold running water and many other innovations. Carte hired César Ritz as manager and Auguste Escoffier as chef de cuisine; they established an unprecedented standard of quality in hotel service, entertainment and elegant dining, attracting royalty and other rich and powerful guests and diners. Notable queer residents: Sarah Bernhardt in 1913, Marlon Brando in 1967, Dorothy Caruso in 1902, Noël Coward from 1941 to 1943, Sergei Diaghilev in 1919, Marlene Dietrich from 1924 to 1925, Cary Grant in 1966, Katharine Hepburn, Vaslav Nijinsky in 1911, Oscar Wilde.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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The Warwick New York Hotel is a luxury hotel located at 65 West 54th Street, near Sixth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City. It is owned by Warwick International Hotels.
Address: 65 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76253, -73.97816)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 (212) 247-2700
Place
Built in 1926
William Randolph Hearst built the Warwick New York Hotel for $5 million. Long catering to the elite, Hearst built the 36-story residential tower to accommodate his Hollywood friends as well as his mistress, the actress Marion Davies, who had her own specially-designed floor in the building. The hotel’s restaurant, Murals on 54, features the 1937 murals of illustrator Dean Cornwell. The famed murals were fully restored following a 2004 renovation of the restaurant. The Warwick is also home to Randolph’s Bar & Lounge, whose rosebud leitmotif references Hearst’s purported nickname for Marion Davies.
Notable queer residents at Warwick Hotel:
• James Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955) was a frequent guest.
• Cary Grant (1904-1986) resided at the Warwick and lived in the hotel for 12 years.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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75½ Bedford St is a building in the Greenwich Village area of New York City that is only 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 meters) wide. It is considered to be the narrowest house in New York. Its past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 - November 15, 1978). It is sometimes referred to as the Millay House, indicated by a New York City Landmark plaque on the outside of the house.
Address: 75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1873
The three-story house is located at 75½ Bedford St., off Seventh Ave. between Commerce and Moore Streets, in the West Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. On the inside, the house measures 8 ft. 7 in. wide; at its narrowest, it is only 2 ft. wide. There is a shared garden in the rear of the house. The archives of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation states that the house was constructed in 1873 during a smallpox epidemic, for Horatio Gomez, trustee of the Hettie Hendricks-Gomez Estate, on what was the former carriage entranceway for the adjacent property, which includes the 1799 house at 77 Bedford St., built by Joshua Isaacs, the oldest house in Greenwich Village. However, the house may have been constructed earlier, as the style that appears in a 1922 photograph at the New-York Historical Society is typical of the 1850’s Italianate architecture common in the area at the time. In 1923, the house was leased by a consortium of artists who used it for actors working at the Cherry Lane Theater. Cary Grant and John Barrymore stayed at the house while performing at the Cherry Lane during this time. Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Pulitzer Prize winning poet and her new husband, coffee importer Eugen Jan Boissevain, lived in the house from 1923 to 1924. They hired Ferdinand Savignano to renovate the house, who added a skylight, transformed the top floor into a studio for Millay and added a Dutch-inspired front gabled façade for her husband. Later occupants included cartoonist William Steig, and his sister-in-law, anthropologist Margaret Mead. The current owner is George Gund IV (son of sports entrepreneur George Gund III), who purchased the house for $3.25 million in June 2013. “A centrally placed spiral staircase dominates all three floors and bisects the space into two distinct living areas. The narrow steps call for expert sideways navigational skills. Under the stairwell on the first floor is a tiny utility closet, the only closed storage space in the house. All three floors have fireplaces.” The house has two bathrooms, and its galley kitchen comes with a microwave built into the base of the winding staircase that rises to the upper floors.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
Edna St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, "She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century." Millay was openly bisexual. Counted among her close friends were the writers Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and the critic Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. In January 1921, she went to Paris, where she met and befriended the sculptor Thelma Wood. In 1923 she married 43-year-old Eugen Jan Boissevain (1880–1949), the widower of the labor lawyer and war correspondent Inez Milholland, a political icon Millay had met during her time at Vassar. Boissevain died in 1949 of lung cancer, and Millay lived alone for the last year of her life.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cary Grant honeymooned at 796 Via Miraleste, Palm Springs, with his second wife, heiress Barbara Hutton; he later purchased the Kocher estate at 928 Avenida Las Palmas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4974588.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Charles Bruce Chatwin was an English travel writer, novelist, and journalist. His first book, In Patagonia, established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales.
Born: May 13, 1940, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Died: January 18, 1989, Nice, France
Spouse: Elizabeth Chanler (m. 1965–1989)
Movies: Cobra Verde, On the Black Hill, Utz
Parents: Margharita Chatwin, Charles Chatwin
Lived: Kalamitsi 240 22, Greece (36.88091, 22.24041)
The Albany, Piccadilly, W1J
Studied: Marlborough College
University of Edinburgh
Buried: Agios Nikolaos, Chora, Aghios Nikolaos, Regional unit of Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, W1J built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy. In Oscar Wilde's play, “The Importance of Being Earnest” (1895), the character John (Jack) Worthing has a set at the Albany (number B4), where he lives while staying in London under the assumed name of Ernest. Notable queer residents: Sybille Bedford, writer, lived in Aldous Huxley's servant's room; Bruce Chatwin, writer; Aldous Huxley, writer; Matthew “The Monk” Lewis, from 1802 to 1818 (number K1); Compton Mackenzie, writer, from 1911 to 1912 (number E1); Sir Harold Nicolson, writer and politician from 1952 to 1965 (number C1); Terence Stamp, actor. George Cecil Ives had an apartment here which he shared with his live-in servant and lover, James Goddard (Kit) in 1894. The place was held in high esteem. Ives “refused to allow a third man to join him and Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde's intimate friend, for sex, --- because “it wouldn't do at the Albany”.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The village of Kalamitsi, just outside Kardamili was, in his later years, the principal home of Patrick Leigh Fermor and his wife Joan. Patrick was an English writer who was made an honorary citizen of the village for his participation in the Greek Resistance during World War II, especially in Crete. He died in hospital in 2011 the day after returning to his other home in Dumbleton in England. The ashes of his friend, the writer Bruce Chatwin, were scattered near a Byzantine chapel above the village in 1989.
Address: Kalamitsi 240 22, Greece (36.88091, 22.24041)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has approved a grant to the Benaki Museum to fully cover the repair and restoration works as well as the cost of the necessary equipment for the Patrick and Joan Leigh Fermor House in Kardamyli. This unique property will soon start operating as a centre for hosting notable figures from the intellectual and artistic worlds as well as a centre for educational activities in collaboration with Institutions in Greece and abroad. The Fermor property is located in the Kalamitsi area on the outskirts of Kardamyli, in Messenia, and has a total area of about nine stremmata, a little over two acres. It is, by general consensus, one of the most beautiful properties in Greece. Its direct contact with the sea—narrow stone steps lead to a small pebble beach just below the estate—the low, discreet, stone buildings and the Mediterranean garden that goes down to the water, comprise an ideal environment for focus and the creative process. In short, a sojourn in this place is a great gift that Greece can offer to notable figures from the intellectual and artistic worlds.
Life
Who: Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor, DSO, OBE (February 11, 1915 – June 10, 2011) and Charles Bruce Chatwin (May 13, 1940 – January 18, 1989)
Paddy Fermor was a British author, scholar and soldier who played a prominent role behind the lines in the Cretan resistance during the WWII. He was widely regarded as Britain's greatest living travel writer during his lifetime, based on books such as “A Time of Gifts” (1977). He influenced the whole generation of British writers such as Bruce Chatwin, Colin Thubron, Philip Marsden, Nicholas Crane, and Rory Stewart. A BBC journalist once described him as "a cross between Indiana Jones, James Bond and Graham Greene." After many years together, Leigh Fermor was married in 1968 to the Honourable Joan Elizabeth Rayner (née Eyres Monsell), daughter of Bolton Eyres-Monsell, 1st Viscount Monsell. She accompanied him on many of his travels until her death in Kardamyli in June 2003, aged 91. They had no children. They lived part of the year in their house in an olive grove near Kardamyli in the Mani Peninsula, southern Peloponnese, and part of the year in Gloucestershire. The house at Kardamyli was featured in the 2013 film “Before Midnight.” Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989) was an English travel writer, novelist, and journalist. His first book, “In Patagonia” (1977), established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales. For “In Patagonia” Chatwin received the Hawthornden Prize and the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Graham Greene, Patrick Leigh Fermor, and Paul Theroux praised the book. As a result of the success of In Patagonia, Chatwin's circle of friends expanded to include individuals such as Jacqueline Onassis, Susan Sontag, and Jasper Johns. Chatwin's ashes were scattered near a Byzantine chapel above Kardamyli in the Peloponnese. This was close to the home of one of his mentors, Patrick Leigh Fermor. Near here, Chatwin had spent several months in 1985 working on “The Songlines.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4974125.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Adolf von Hildebrand was a German sculptor.
Born: October 6, 1847, Marburg, Germany
Died: January 18, 1921, Munich, Germany
Education: Academy of Fine Arts, Nuremberg
Academy of Fine Arts, Munich
Books: The problem of form in painting and sculpture
Children: Dietrich von Hildebrand
Lived: Maria-Theresia-Straße 23, 81675 München, Germany
Buried: Kirchhof Oberföhring, Oberfohring, Münchener Stadtkreis, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany

Hans von Marees was a German painter. He mainly painted country scenes in a realistic style. Marees' lifelong companion was art theorist and critic Konrad Fiedler, who, in his Kunstwissenschaft, created the theory of pure form, rejecting the concepts of Beauty and Art. However, Marees also had an 8 years love affair with sculptor Adolph von Hildebrand. In 1869, von Marees visited France, the Netherlands and Spain with Fiedler. He served in military in the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71) and then lived in Berlin and Dresden for a while. In 1873, he decorated the library walls of the newly built German Marine Zoological Institute in Naples, Italy with von Hildebrand. In 1877, von Hildebrand married Irene Schäuffelen. A painting by von Marees immortalized this event, with Irene in the middle of von Marees and von Hildebrand, with von Hildebrand reaching out to von Marees. Von Marees spent the last years of his life in Rome, supported by Fiedler. He died there in 1887, at the age of 49, and was buried in the Protestant Cemetery.
They met in 1866 and remained friends until Marees’ death in 1887: 21 years.
Hans von Marees (December 24, 1837 - June 5, 1887)
Konrad Fiedler (September 23, 1841 - June 3, 1895)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Adolf von Hildebrand (1847–1921) is one of the most important neoclassical sculptors. Its marble monuments, busts and sculptures inspired by antiquity are among the best artistic achievements of German idealism: the Wittelsbach fountain at the Lehnbachplatz, the Father-Rhine fountain at Ludwigsbrücke, the equestrian statue of the Prince Regent Luitpold and the Hubertusbrunnen at the end of the Nymphenburger canal. After studying at Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, Adolf von Hildebrand first traveled to Italy in 1867 and there met German philosophers and art theorists whose aesthetic theories greatly inspired him. Florentine Renaissance sculpture became his point of reference, and in 1872 he moved to Italy. Not until an 1884 exhibition in Berlin did his work come to the attention of a wider public in Germany. Seven years later, Hildebrand received his first large commission, for a fountain in Munich, whose completion brought him general recognition and numerous commissions. From then until the beginning of WWI, he divided his time between Florence and Munich. In 1898 Adolf von Hildebrand and his family moved in the newly built estate in Maria-Theresia-Straße 23. He died on October 18, 1921 aged 73 years in Munich and is buried in the cemetery of St. Lorenz at Oberföhring (Muspillistraße 14, 81925 München, Germany). His heirs, his son Dr. Dietrich von Hildebrand and one of his daughters Irene Georgii, sold the Hildebrandhaus to the author Elisabeth Braun in 1934.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4974000.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Arthur Annesley Ronald Firbank was an innovative English novelist. His eight short novels, partly inspired by the London aesthetes of the 1890s, especially Oscar Wilde, consist largely of dialogue, with ...
Born: January 17, 1886, London, United Kingdom
Died: May 21, 1926, Rome
Education: Trinity Hall, Cambridge
Buried: Cimitero Comunale Monumentale Campo Verano, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy, Plot: Tomba a terra, Ex Evangelici, Riquadro 38

The Campo Verano is a cemetery in Rome that was founded in the early XIX century. The cemetery is currently divided into sections: the Jewish cemetery, the Catholic cemetery, and the monument to the victims of the World War I.
Address: Piazzale del Verano, 1, 00185 Roma, Italy (41.90173, 12.52183)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 4923 6331
Place
The Verano is located in the quartiere Tiburtino of Rome, near the Basilica of San Lorenzo fuori le mura. The name verano a refers to the Ancient Roman campo dei Verani that was located here. The zone contained ancient Christian catacombs. But a modern cemetery was not established till the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy during 1807-1812, when the architect Giuseppe Valadier was commissioned designs after the Edict of Saint Cloud required burials to take place outside of the city walls. The papal authorities still have some control over the administration. Pope Francis celebrated All Saints Day Mass here on a papal visit to the Cemetery on Saturday, November 1, 2014.
Notable queer burials at Campo Verano:
• Ronald Firbank (1886-1926), English novelist. Openly gay and chronically shy, he was an enthusiastic consumer of alcohol and cannabis. He died of lung disease in Rome, aged 40.
• Charles Kenneth Scott Moncrieff (1889-1930), Scottish writer, most famous for his English translation of most of Proust's “À la recherche du temps perdu,” which he published under the Shakespearean title “Remembrance of Things Past.” During his time at Edinburgh University, Scott Moncrieff met Philip Bainbrigge, then an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge, later a schoolmaster at Shrewsbury and the author of miscellaneous homoerotic odes to Uranian Love. Bainbrigge was killed in action at Épehy in September 1918. At the January 1918 wedding of Robert Graves, Scott Moncrieff met the war poet Wilfred Owen in whose work he took a keen interest. Through his role at the War Office Scott Moncrieff attempted to secure Owen a Home posting which would have prevented his return to the Front. According to Owen's biographer the evidence suggests a “brief sexual relationship that somehow failed.” After Owen's death, Scott Moncrieff's failure to secure a "safe" posting for Owen was viewed with suspicion by his friends, including Osbert Sitwell and Siegfried Sassoon. During the 1920s, Scott Moncrieff maintained a rancorous rivalry with Sitwell, who depicted him unflatteringly as "Mr. X" in “All At Sea.” Scott Moncrieff responded with the pamphlet “The Strange and Striking Adventure of Four Authors in Search of a Character, 1926,” a satire on the Sitwell family. Through his friendship with the young Noël Coward, he made the acquaintance of Mrs Astley Cooper and became a frequent house guest at her home Hambleton Hall. He dedicated the first volume of his translation of Proust to Mrs Astley Cooper. Scott Moncrieff died of cancer at Calvary Hospital in Rome in 1930. His remains lie in a small communal ossuary with those who died in the same month at the same convent. The exact place can be located by doing a search by name and date of death at the gate.
• George Santayana (1863-1952) was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. Originally from Spain, Santayana was raised and educated in the United States from the age of eight and identified himself as an American, although he always kept a valid Spanish passport. He wrote in English and is generally considered an American man of letters. Santayana never married. His romantic life, if any, is not well understood. Some evidence, including a comment Santayana made late in life comparing himself to A. E. Housman, and his friendships with people who were openly homosexual and bisexual, has led scholars to speculate that Santayana was perhaps homosexual or bisexual himself, but it remains unclear whether he had any actual heterosexual or homosexual relationships. At the age of forty-eight, Santayana left his position at Harvard and returned to Europe permanently, never to return to the United States. His last wish was to be buried in the Spanish pantheon in Rome.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4973744.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Miriam Van Waters was an early American feminist social worker and Episcopalian leader of the Social Gospel movement. She served as superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women at Framingham.
Born: 1887, United States of America
Died: 1974, Framingham, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Clark University
Books: Youth in conflict, Parents on Probation
Lived: 1833 North Verdugo Road, Vista Park, Glendale
Buried: Pine Hill Cemetery, Sherborn, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: 507 Eastern Ave, GPS (lat/lon): 42.24455, -71.36334

Miriam Van Waters was a noted early American feminist social worker and served as superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women at Framingham (1932–1957). Van Waters was also a closeted lesbian during this period, and in fact, it was a 'moral panic' against 'prison lesbianism' that almost led to her dismissal as a superintendent in 1949. Geraldine Morgan Thompson met Miriam Van Waters in the mid-1920s; Thompson was the owner of Brookdale, an 800-acre estate in Red Bank, New Jersey. She was the wife of Lewis S. Thompson, who established Sunny Hill Plantation in 1913. Van Waters and Thompson remained together 40 years and Miriam adopted a little girl named Sarah. When Geraldine died on September 9, 1967, she had lived for ninety-five extraordinarily full years, almost half of them as Miriam van Waters' "Dearest Love" and protector. Waters and Thompson remained lovers, and participated in joint social activities like membership of the Audubon Society. As a small, final tribute, Van Waters wrote an obituary for Thompson in the Framingham News.
Together from (around) 1925 to 1967: 42 years.
Miriam Van Waters (October 4, 1887 – January 17, 1974)
Geraldine Livingston Morgan Thompson (March 2, 1872 – September 9, 1967)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Pine Hill Cemetery (Sherborn, MA 01770) is buried Miriam Van Waters (1887-1974), an early American feminist social worker and Episcopalian leader of the Social Gospel movement. She served as superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women at Framingham (1932–1957). In the 1930s she lived in California, at 1833 North Verdugo Road, Vista Park, Glendale.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4973381.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.

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