elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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elisa_rolle

Cary Grant & Randolph Scott

Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986), born Archibald Leach, is consistently at the top of lists of the greatest movies stars of all time. (P: RKO publicity still from Suspicion, 1941 (©17))

Grant was bisexual, and was married five times, but he was regarded as a gay man by Hollywood insiders throughout his career.

He and actor Randolph SCOTT lived as a gay couple in Hollywood for many years. Their relationship scandalized Hollywood in the 1930s, and it continued through several of their marriages to women. In his book, Cary Grant: Grant's Secret Sixth Marriage (2004), Marc Eliot claims Grant had a sexual relationship with Scott after they met on the set of Hot Saturday (1932). A series of publicity photographs taken in 1933 of the two actors in their home and on the beach fanned the rumors, along with Scott's decision to continue living with Grant, even after Grant's bride, actress Virginia Cherrill, moved in with them. In Hollywood Gays (1996), Boze Hadleigh cites homosexual director George Cukor who said about the homosexual relationship between the two: "Oh, Cary won't talk about it. At most, he'll say they did some wonderful pictures together. But Randolph will admit it – to a friend." According to William J. Mann's book, Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood, 1910–1969, photographer Jerome Zerbe spent "three gay months" in the movie colony taking many photographs of Grant and Scott, "attesting to their involvement in the gay scene." In 1944 Scott and Grant stopped living together but remained close friends throughout their lives.


Cary Grant was an English actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. They met in 1932 when they were cast together in Hot Saturday. They lived together for many many years in Los Angeles. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters. Scott died little more than 3 months after Grant.













































In his even wilder days as a new arrival from England, Grant had shared a Manhattan apartment with Aussie designer ORRY-KELLY. Their parties were notorious among gay society at the time.

Grant also had a sexual liaison with then-twenty-nine-year-old Howard HUGHES. Grant and Hughes remained close for many years, even as Hughes drifted into insanity and became a recluse.

Grant was the first actor to use the word “gay” to refer to homosexuality in a Hollywood film (Bringing Up Baby in 1938)—while in drag, no less.

Grant’s longtime personal secretary, Frank Horn, was rumored to possess Hollywood’s largest collection of gay erotica.

In 1970 Grant was awarded an honorary Oscar. In his later years, Grant retired from acting to travel the world, selling a line of perfumes and colognes.

Stern, Keith (2009-09-01). Queers in History: The Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Historical Gays, Lesbians and Bisexuals (Kindle Locations 5564-5576). Perseus Books Group. Kindle Edition.

Orry-Kelly was the professional name of Orry George Kelly (31 December 1897 – 27 February 1964), a prolific Hollywood costume designer.

He was born in Kiama, New South Wales, Australia, and was known as Jack Kelly. His father William Kelly, was born on the Isle of Man and was a gentleman tailor in Kiama. Orry was a name of an ancient King of Man. He studied art in Sydney, and worked as a tailor's apprentice and window dresser.

He journeyed to New York to pursue an acting career. He shared an apartment there with Charlie Spangles and Cary Grant. At the time Cary Grant was Archibald Leach. They shared the apartment in Manhattan, where they carried on a domestic existence as a gay couple, developing a reputation for throwing wild parties. Orry-Kelly established himself as a designer of scenery and costumes for Broadway musicals, while Archie pursued a career as an actor. A job painting murals in a nightclub led to his employment by Fox East Coast studios illustrating titles. He designed costumes and sets for Broadway's Shubert Revues and George White's Scandals.

He went to Hollywood in 1932, working for all the major studios (Warner Brothers, Universal, RKO, 20th Century Fox, and MGM), and designed for all the great actresses of the day, including Bette Davis, Kay Francis, Olivia de Havilland, Katharine Hepburn, Dolores del Río, Ava Gardner, Ann Sheridan, Barbara Stanwyck, and Merle Oberon.


Orry-Kelly was the professional name of Orry George, a prolific Hollywood costume designer. A job painting murals in a nightclub led to his employment by Fox East Coast studios illustrating titles. He designed costumes and sets for Broadway's Shubert Revues and George White's Scandals. While in Los Angeles, he was living with Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When he died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.


Barbara Stanwyck






Marilyn Monroe








Les Girls






Dolores Del Rio


Ingrid Bergman




Ava Gardner


Kay Francis


Glenda Farrell


Bette Davis






Rosalind Russell







He worked on many films now deemed classics, including 42nd Street, The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, Arsenic and Old Lace, Harvey, Oklahoma!, Auntie Mame, and Some Like It Hot.

He won three Academy Awards for Best Costume Design (for An American in Paris, Cole Porter's Les Girls, and Some Like It Hot) and was nominated for a fourth (for Gypsy).

He wrote a column 'Hollywood Fashion Parade' for the International News Service, owned by William Randolph Hearst, during the war years.

While in Los Angeles, he was apparently living with Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was aknowledged by Orry-Kelly's mother as well.

A longtime alcoholic, he died of liver cancer in Hollywood and was interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills). His pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and his eulogy was read by Jack Warner. His Academy Awards went to Jack Warner's wife, Ann.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orry-Kelly

Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987) was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. As a leading man for all but the first three years of his cinematic career, Scott appeared in a variety of genres, including social dramas, crime dramas, comedies, musicals (albeit in non-singing and non-dancing roles), adventure tales, war films, and even a few horror and fantasy films. However, his most enduring image is that of the tall-in-the-saddle Western hero. Out of his more than 100 film appearances more than 60 were in Westerns; thus, "of all the major stars whose name was associated with the Western, Scott most closely identified with it." (P: Original studio publicity photo of Randolph Scott, ca. 1930s (©17))

Scott met Howard Hughes on a golf course, and they became lovers for a time. Scott and Cary Grant lived together as a gay couple for a number of years and remained close ever afterward. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters.

Scott's more than 30 years as a motion picture actor resulted in his working with many acclaimed screen directors, including Henry King, Rouben Mamoulian, Michael Curtiz, John Cromwell, King Vidor, Alan Dwan, Fritz Lang, and Sam Peckinpah. He also worked on multiple occasions with prominent directors: Henry Hathaway (eight times), Ray Enright (seven), Edwin R. Marin (seven), André de Toth (six), and most notably, his seven film collaborations with Budd Boetticher.

Scott also worked with a diverse array of cinematic leading ladies, from Shirley Temple and Irene Dunne to Mae West and Marlene Dietrich. He also appeared with Gene Tierney, Ann Sheridan, Maureen O'Hara, Nancy Carroll, Donna Reed, Gail Russell, Margaret Sullavan, Virginia Mayo, Bebe Daniels, Carole Lombard, and Joan Bennett.

Tall (6 ft 2.5 in; 189 cm), lanky, and handsome, Scott displayed an easygoing charm and courtly Southern drawl in his early films that helped offset his limitations as an actor, where he was frequently found to be stiff or "lumbering". As he matured, however, Scott's acting improved while his features became burnished and leathery, turning him into the ideal "strong, silent" type of stoic hero. The BFI Companion to the Western noted:

In his earlier Westerns ... the Scott persona is debonair, easy-going, graceful, though with the necessary hint of steel. As he matures into his fifties his roles change. Increasingly Scott becomes the man who has seen it all, who has suffered pain, loss, and hardship, and who has now achieved (but at what cost?) a stoic calm proof against vicissitude.

During the early 1950s, Scott was a consistent box-office draw. In the annual Motion Picture Herald Top Ten Polls, he ranked 10th in 1950, eighth in 1951, and again 10th in 1952. Scott also appeared in the Quigley's Top Ten Money Makers Poll from 1950 to 1953.

Scott married twice. In 1936 he became the second husband of heiress Marion duPont, daughter of William Du Pont, Sr. and great-granddaughter of Éleuthère Irénée Du Pont de Nemours, the founder of the E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Marion had previously married George Somerville, with Scott serving as Best Man at the wedding. Reputedly the couple spent little time together and the marriage ended in divorce three years later. Prior to and between his first and second marriages Scott was romantically linked with several prominent film actresses, including Lupe Vélez, Sally Blane, Claire Trevor, and Dorothy Lamour. In 1944 Scott married Patricia Stillman, with whom he adopted two children. The marriage lasted until Scott's death in 1987.

Although Scott achieved fame as a motion picture actor, he managed to keep a fairly low profile with his private life. Off-screen he was good friends with Fred Astaire and Cary Grant. He met Grant on the set of Hot Saturday (1932) where they share only one scene together and shortly afterwards they began rooming together in a beach house in Malibu that became known as "Bachelor Hall." According to biographer Robert Nott, "They lived together on and off for about ten years, because they were friends and wanted to save on living expenses (they were both considered to be notorious tightwads)."

In his book, Cary Grant: Grant's Secret Sixth Marriage (2004), Marc Eliot claims Grant had a sexual relationship with Scott after they met on the set of Hot Saturday (1932). He also claimed that while they may have saved money by rooming together, they also lost career opportunities after Paramount decided not to pair them together in the film Spawn of the North because of the rumors regarding the duo's sexual orientation. They didn't work together until the hit film My Favorite Wife (1940), at which time, Eliot claimed Grant used his clout and star power to get Scott cast in a supporting role in the film. A series of publicity photographs taken in 1933 of the two actors in their home and on the beach fanned the rumors, along with Scott's decision to continue living with Grant, even after Grant's bride, actress Virginia Cherrill, moved in with them. In Hollywood Gays (1996), Boze Hadleigh, author of numerous books purporting to "out" the sexual orientation of celebrities, makes various claims for Scott's homosexuality. He cites homosexual director George Cukor who said about the homosexual relationship between the two: "Oh, Cary won't talk about it. At most, he'll say they did some wonderful pictures together. But Randolph will admit it – to a friend." There is considerable disagreement over the veracity of Hadleigh's claims about alleged homosexuals in Hollywood. According to William J. Mann's book, Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood, 1910–1969, photographer Jerome Zerbe spent "three gay months" in the movie colony taking many photographs of Grant and Scott, "attesting to their involvement in the gay scene." In 1995, Richard Blackwell published his autobiography From Rags to Bitches, where he declared he was a lover of both Grant and Scott. In 2012, Scotty Bowers wrote a memoir "Full Service," where he also claimed that he was a lover of both Grant and Scott.

In 1944 Scott and Grant stopped living together but remained close friends throughout their lives. Grant's insistence that he had "nothing against gays, I'm just not one myself", is treated at length in Peter Bogdanovich's book of essays about actors, Who the Hell's in It. Scott's adopted son, Christopher, also challenged the rumors. Following Scott's death, Christopher wrote a book entitled, Whatever Happened to Randolph Scott?, in which he rebuts rumors of his father's alleged homosexuality. Budd Boetticher, the director most often linked with Scott's work, had this to say about the rumors: "Bullshit."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randolph_Scott

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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