September 13th, 2012

andrew potter

GayRomLit Ebook Giveaway: Carolyn Gray - Long Way Home

I asked to all the authors joining the GayRomLit convention in Albuquerque in October (http://gayromlit.com/authors.php) a personal favor, a special Ebook Giveaway: every day I will post 1 book from each author, and among those who will leave a comment, I will draw a winner. Very easy and very fast ;-) I will send a PM to the winner, so remember to not leave anonymous comments! (comments close on September 15)

And the ebook giveaway goes to: bokl_c, please contact me.

Today author is Carolyn Gray (http://www.carolyngraybooks.net/)

Long Way Home by Carolyn Gray
Publisher: Loose Id LLC (October 17, 2011)
Amazon Kindle: Long Way Home

Musician Lee Nelson is determinedly single. His bandmates don't even know he is gay. He's managed to keep that important fact about himself, as well as any details of his painful past, out of conversation. But the past starts to catch up with him when the band travels to Dallas, Texas, and an anonymous gift of ballet tickets leads him to ballet dancer Gevan Sinclair--his first love's brother.

Gev is a professional ballet dancer, but just as the past has its grip on Lee Nelson, so too does Gev struggle--namely, with the disappearance of his brother, Stefan. Gev had always had a crush on Lee Nelson, but crushes are for kids and he'd forgotten all about Lee until the day he looked up after a performance and saw him in the balcony, hungrily watching his every move.

Gev and Lee are drawn together when Gev's roommate is killed, and they must face their fears and escape the stranglehold of the past to solve the mystery that keeps them apart...and make a long journey home.
andrew potter

Adrian (March 3, 1903 — September 13, 1959)

Adrian Adolph Greenberg (March 3, 1903 — September 13, 1959), most widely known as Adrian, was an American costume designer whose most famous costumes were for The Wizard of Oz and other Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer films of the 1930s and 1940s. During his career, he designed costumes for over 250 films and his screen credits usually read as "Gowns by Adrian". On occasion, he was credited as Gilbert Adrian, a combination of his father's forename and his own.

Adrian was born on March 3, 1903 in Naugatuck, Connecticut to Jewish immigrant parents Gilbert and Helena (Pollack) Greenberg. He attended the New York School for Fine and Applied Arts (now Parsons School of Design). In 1922, he transferred to NYSFAA's Paris campus and while there was hired by Irving Berlin. Adrian then designed the costumes for Berlin's The Music Box Revue.

Adrian was hired by Rudolph Valentino's wife Natacha Rambova to design costumes for A Sainted Devil in 1924. He would also design for Rambova's film, What Price Beauty? (1925). Adrian became head costume designer for Cecil B. DeMille's independent film studio. In 1928, Cecil B. DeMille moved temporarily to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Adrian was hired as chief costume designer at the studio. While DeMille eventually returned to Paramount, Adrian stayed on at MGM. In his career at that studio, Adrian designed costumes for over 200 films.


Adrian, "Shades of Picasso", 1944–45. Adrian developed a style in the mid-1940s that echoed the Cubist paintings of artists like George Braque (1882-1963) and Pablo Picasso (1881-1973). A painter as well as a designer, Adrian manipulated pieces of fabric as deftly as his paintbrush, juxtaposing colors and shapes in a style that would become a signature of his designs in the mid and late 1940s. This dress, titled "Shades of Picasso," was included in the "Modern Museum" collection of 1945. Garments from the collection, along with other Adrian designs, were featured at the 1945 American Fashion Critics awards ceremony when Adrian won his Coty award.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_(costume_designer)

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More Fashion Designers at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art



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