June 19th, 2013

andrew potter

Harlan Greene, Olin Jolley & Jonathan Ray

Harlan Greene (born June 19, 1953) is the project archivist at Charleston’s Avery Institute and the author of “The German Officer’s Boy.” Prior works include two historical novels about gay life in Charleston, S.C., and an admirable shelf of nonfiction books on Southern history.

Greene’s parents, Sam and Regina, survived the Holocaust in Russian work camps during World War II. They were married in June 1939, shortly before war broke out. After the war, his parents moved to Charleston, where his mother had an aunt and a first cousin. Born in 1953, Greene was raised in Charleston, where he now lives with his partner, Jonathan Ray, head of the Charleston Concierge Association. The dedica of The German Officer's Boy reads: For Jonathan Ray, You raise me up. Among the projects Greene has worked on locally has been to help collect and archive the experiences of Jews in South Carolina of the past 200 years, forming the basis of the Jewish archive at the College of Charleston.

In 1989, Greene lived in Chapel Hill, N.C., where his companion at the time, Olin Jolley, was starting his residency in psychiatry at the University of North Carolina. In October of that year, Jolley was diagnosed with AIDS.

“I started working on this novel right when Olin was diagnosed with AIDS,” Greene said. “Ironically, it was on Yom Kippur of 1989 that he basically went into the hospital and almost died. He subsequently lived seven years. I think that’s one thing that launched me onto this novel — and I’m certainly not comparing my experiences with Olin being sick with Holocaust experiences — but what struck me in those first few months when Olin got sick and we weren’t telling his parents was that I was leading something of a double life, pretending everything was fine but there was this devastating experience that I was going through. It struck me that this might be what someone felt who was passing at the time — a Jew pretending not to be Jewish pretending not to be going through a tragedy. Olin’s experience made me read a lot more stuff into Holocaust works and appreciate my parents’ experience much more.”


Harlan Greene with Olin Jolley, 1991, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)

Jonathan Ray And Harlan Greene

Source: http://forward.com/articles/3438/the-boy-who-started-a-war/#ixzz1yECBkv3v (Jameson Currier)
The German Officer's Boy by Harlan Greene is an "highly original and compassionate account of how the fires of a forbidden love engulfed Europe. Harlan Greene has brought to life 'the boy who started World War II' in a headlong narrative both tender and terrifying." - Katherine Govier. I read this is in one evening- that is how utterly amazing this book was. --Stephan Schmetterling
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

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andrew potter

Pat Parker (January 20, 1944 - June 19, 1989)

Pat Parker (January 20, 1944 – June 19, 1989 Houston, Texas) was an African-American lesbian feminist poet.

Parker grew up working class poor in Third Ward, Houston, Texas, a mostly African-American part of the city. Her mother (born Marie Louise Anderson) was a domestic worker, and her father, Ernest Nathaniel Cooks retreated tires.

When she was four years old, her family moved to Sunnyside, Houston, Texas.

She left home at seventeen, moved to Los Angeles, California, earning an undergraduate degree there at Los Angeles City College, and a graduate degree at San Francisco State College. She got married (to playwright Ed Bullins) in 1962. Parker and Bullins separated after four years and she alluded to her ex-husband as physically violent, and said she was "scared to death of him".

She got married a second time, to Berkeley, California writer Robert F. Parker, but decided that the "idea of marriage... wasn't working" for her.

Parker began to identify as a lesbian in the late 1960s, and, in a 1975 interview with Anita Cornwell, stated that "after my first relationship with a woman, I knew where I was going."

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Parker
Parker's cycle of poems, Movement in Black, should not be read in a favorite armchair but shouted from a rooftop. Or at least a stage. With choreography. --David Pratt
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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices


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andrew potter

Ralph G. Moritz (November 16, 1912 - June 19, 1998)

Ralph G. Moritz was born in Waterloo, Iowa, on November 16, 1912. He was a librarian and classical music enthusiast. He attended the University of Northern Iowa, in Cedar Rapids, in the 1930s. His last known position was Chief Catalog Librarian at California State University, Los Angeles.

His special interests were travel and music, and from at least the 1960s onwards he made several trips a year to music festivals and performances both in the United States and Europe.

He died in Los Angeles on June 19, 1998.

His papers are collected at The Online Archive of California (OAC), which provides free public access to detailed descriptions of primary resource collections. The papers consist of travel diaries of Ralph G. Moritz, listing the sights he saw, the concerts he attended, and his sexual encounters on his travels from the late 1960s to the early 1980s. The bulk of the collection consists of letters Moritz received from the mid 1970s to the early 1980s from Samuel Potter, aka "Octavian", Brown (1916-1995), an expatriate American living in Rome, who in the 1970s and early 1980s ran a small bed and breakfast and male bordello, that Moritz frequented, out of his apartment. The letters detail the trials, tribulations, and pleasures of life in Rome, and are filled with gossip about the lives of his "boys" and his clients, from the unnamed to the famous.

Source: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt867nf1sn/

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Richard Goldstein (born June 19, 1944)

Richard Goldstein (born June 19, 1944) is an American journalist and writer. He wrote for the Village Voice from June 1966 until 2004, eventually becoming executive editor. He specializes in gay and lesbian issues, music, and counterculture topics.

Goldstein was born to Jack and Mollye Goldstein. He was raised in the Bronx in the Parkside Houses. His father was a mail carrier, his mother a homemaker. He attended Hunter College for his undergraduate degree. Goldstein graduated from Columbia University School of Journalism in 1966, and joined the Village Voice in June of that year. He published his first book 1 in 7: Drugs on Campus in 1966. Goldstein covered the emerging worlds of pop and rock music in his "Pop Eye" column, establishing him one of the first rock critics. He also wrote pieces for Vogue, Mademoiselle, Travel and Camera, The Saturday Evening Post, The Los Angeles Times, and The New York Times. Asked to write The Times's review of the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, Goldstien wrote a negative appraisal. This unleashed a backlash from Beatles fans, many of whom were unaware of Goldstein's previous work praising the band. Goldstein has since shifted his opinion on the album. He left the Village Voice in 1968, but he returned in the early 1970s in an editorial role. He has issued two collections of his work, Reporting the Counterculture and Goldstein's Greatest Hits. He also released a collection of rock lyrics interspersed with psychedelic illustrations, The Poetry of Rock. This book has been taught in literature classes in a number of secondary schools and universities.

Goldstein, who came out in the 1970s, has been a champion of gay rights and issued early calls for attention to the AIDS epidemic. Since, he has tackled the cutting-edge topic of gay power politics with two books published in the early 2000s (decade): The Attack Queers and Homocons. He famously issued a call in The Nation for Eminem to duel with him, taking exception to the controversial rapper's homophobic lyrics. Goldstein is a GLAAD-award winner for his contributions to the gay community.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Goldstein_(writer_born_1944)

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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Taylor Siluwé (January 27, 1966 - June 19, 2011)

Taylor Siluwé was a popular writer, blogger and activist. He died On Sunday, June 19, 2011, from lung cancer in his home in New Jersey. He was 43 years old.

Taylor was born January 27, 1966, in Jersey City, where he lived most of his adult life. He studied creative writing at New York University, fulfilling what he considered “a burning passion to write.” Known for his darkly erotic and humorous story telling style, Taylor’s writing has been featured in numerous publications including Details, Venus, Literary New York, Out IN Jersey, FlavaLIFE, and the E-zine Velvet Mafia. His short stories appeared in the anthologies Law of Desire (Alyson Books) and Best Gay Erotica 2008 (Cleis Press). In addition, Taylor published two sexually charged short story collections, Dancing With the Devil (SGL Café Press) and Cheesy Porn…and other Fairy Tales (SGL Café Press).

Taylor’s writing reached new heights of popularity on his blog, SGL Café.Com, which combined a canny combination of the personal and political. Taylor’s blog served has a fiery, and often hilarious, platform for the rights of same gender loving men, while also providing insightful and candid asides on his personal life, popular culture and his struggle with cancer.

Fellow writer and friend, Nathan James said of Taylor, “ [He] was one of the most beautiful human beings I’ve ever known. He was one of my best friends, and a gifted writer, as well. Like me, Taylor was a passionate LGBT activist and political junkie. We used to sit up for hours and hours at his house, talking about issues of the day. Taylor’s writing was darkly provocative, exploring a different side of LGBT life…”

Source: http://www.lambdaliterary.org/features/06/20/remembering-taylor-siluwe/

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Mitchell Gold & Tim Scofield, Bob Williams & Stephen Heavner

WHEN Mitchell Gold (born 1951) arrived in Manhattan in 1974, he “was young, fresh out of college and closeted,” he recalled. He took a job selling pillows at Bloomingdale’s, and remembered going out with women and usually finding that “the waiter was more interesting, or her brother.”

He eventually began dating men and fell in love with Bob Williams. In 1989, they created the furniture company in Taylorsville, N.C., now known as Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, whose logo looks like something two lovers would carve in a tree. After 14 years together, Gold and Williams decided to go their separate romantic ways, although they remain devoted friends and business partners. Williams met and eventually settled down with Stephen Heavner, who works for MG+BW, and Gold moved forward as a solo act, but not for long.

The company makes couches and armchairs that are hip in an everyman way. Its Web site reads like a friendly blog, with the two founders writing about the importance of giving back to their communities, staying curious and avoiding mean people. (Picture: Mitchell Gold, standing, with husband Tim in their Washington loft. The chair is the Kingston, Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams’ modern version of the classic English wing chair in pearlescent cream leather. Washington Post photo by John McDonnell))

In time, Mr. Gold and Mr. Williams became so well known that their portrait began appearing on the walls of Pottery Barn, which sells their furniture. It was at a store in Chevy Chase, Md., that Tim Scofield first saw Mr. Gold’s photo. Mr. Scofield (born 1977) was working there while studying for a degree in American history at the University of Maryland.

He recalled how he used to stare at the picture and admire Mr. Gold’s cool half-smile and the faded blue jeans that made him look more like a teenager than an executive. (Mr. Gold calls himself the chair-man.)


The couple enjoy a quiet moment at their reception, Stephen Mally for The New York Times


Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams

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Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/04/fashion/weddings/04VOWS.html?_r=1&

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More Designers at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art

More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance



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Steven Goldstein & Steven Greenberg

Steven Greenberg (born June 19, 1956) is an American rabbi with a rabbinic ordination from the Orthodox rabbinical seminary of Yeshiva University (RIETS). He is generally described as the first openly gay Orthodox Jewish rabbi, since he publicly disclosed he was gay in an article in the Israeli newspaper Maariv in 1999 and participated in a 2001 documentary film about homosexual men and women raised in the Orthodox Jewish world. Greenberg currently lives in Cincinnati with his partner Steven Goldstein and their daughter, Amalia, born on November 11, 2010.

Rabbi Greenberg graduated from Yeshiva University in New York and received his s'micha from Yeshiva's Elchanan Seminary in 1999. He then moved to Jerusalem. He formally "came out" at the urging of those with whom he was working to establish Jerusalem Open House as the city's center for the LGBT community -- just a week before the much-publicized opening. The Forward broke the DVD cover: Trembling Before G-dstory. It was then that he met his long-time partner Steven Goldstein (they are known as "the Steves") through film maker Sandi Simcha DuBowski.

DuBowski featured Rabbi Greenberg in his award-winning documentary on gays and lesbians in Orthodoxy, Trembling Before G-d (Israel, 2001).

Greenberg is a Senior Teaching Fellow and Director of Diversity Project at CLAL – the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, and the author of the book “Wrestling with God and Men: Homosexuality in the Jewish Tradition” which received the Koret Jewish Book Award for Philosophy and Thought in 2005.


Steven Greenberg is an American rabbi with a rabbinic ordination from the Orthodox rabbinical seminary of Yeshiva University. He is generally described as the first openly gay Orthodox Jewish rabbi, since he publicly disclosed he was gay in an article in the Israeli newspaper Maariv and participated in a 2001 documentary film about homosexual men and women raised in the Orthodox Jewish world. Greenberg currently lives in Cincinnati with his partner Steven Goldstein and their daughter, Amalia.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Greenberg_(rabbi)

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More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

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Bette Warner & Patty Larkin

Patty Larkin (b. June 19, 1951, Des Moines, Iowa) is a Boston-based singer-songwriter and guitarist. Her music has been described as folk-urban pop music. Patty currently lives with her partner, former dancer now her manager, Bette Warner and two adopted children in Truro, Massachusetts, a resort town on Cape Cod.

Patty Larkin grew up in a musical and artistic family in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Descended from a long line of Irish American singers and taletellers, her mother was a painter, her sisters both musicians. She learned at a young age to appreciate the beauty and magic of the arts. She began classical piano studies at age 7, and became swept up in the sounds of pop and folk in the 60s, teaching herself the guitar and experimenting with songwriting in high school. An English major, Larkin sang throughout her high school and college career, starting out in coffeehouses in Oregon and San Francisco. Upon graduation from the University of Oregon, she moved to Boston, Massachusetts and devoted herself to music, busking on the streets of Cambridge and studying jazz guitar at Berklee College of Music and with Boston area jazz guitarists.

Her recording career began in 1985 with Philo/Rounder Records where she recorded Step Into The Light, I’m Fine, and Live In The Square. In 1990, she signed to Windham Hill’s new High Street label and delivered 4 highly praised releases: Tango, Angels Running, Strangers World and Perishable Fruit. After Windham Hill was sold to BMG, Patty moved to Vanguard Records and released Agogo Live, Regrooving The Dream, Red=Luck and Watch The Sky. The latter was a NY Times Critic Choice. In 2010, Patty celebrates her 25th year of recording with 25, a stripped down retrospective of 25 love songs with 25 featured guests (Road Narrows Records/Signature Sounds).

Patty Larkin produced La Guitara, a compilation of international women guitarists challenging the notion that there are no great women guitarists. She has also performed on numerous compilations and her songs have been featured in the following films: “Anyway The Main Thing Is” in Evolution (Dreamworks); “Good Thing” in Random Hearts (Columbia Pictures); and “Coming Up For Air” and “Tenderness on the Block” in Sliding Doors (Miramax). Cher recorded "Good Thing" on one of her albums.


Photo by Jana Leon

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patty_Larkin

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GayRomLit Ebook Giveaway: Jeff Erno - Losers

I asked to all the authors joining the GayRomLit convention in Atlanta in October (http://gayromlit.com/grl-authors) a personal favor, a special Ebook Giveaway: twice a week I will post 1 book from each author, and among those who will leave a comment, I will draw a winner. Very easy and very fast ;-) I will send a PM to the winner, so remember to not leave anonymous comments!

And the ebook giveaway goes to: juleslovesbooks

Today author is Jeff Erno: Jeff Erno began writing LGBT fiction in the late 1990s. Although an avid reader and amateur writer from a very young age, Jeff pursued a career as a retail store manager in Northern Michigan. When his first gay-themed novel was published, he was shocked that anyone would even want to read it. Four years later, he writes full time and has published fifteen novels. Jeff now lives in Southern Michigan, where he resides with his pure-white cat, Gandalf. Jeff's writing credits include a variety of themes and sub-genres including male romance, Young Adult, Science Fiction, erotica, and BDSM. He is the winner of a 2012 Rainbow Award and an Honorable Mention in 2011. His style is unpretentious and focused upon emotionally-driven, character-based stories that touch the heart. Jeff is especially passionate about young adult literature and combating teen bullying and youth suicide.
Website: http://www.jefferno.com
Most recent title: You Belong With Me
Publishers: Dreamspinner Press, eXtasy Books, Fanny Press, Camel Press, Amazon Digital Services

Losers by Jeff Erno
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Amazon Kindle: Losers

Jacob Stevens is a high school freshman facing an onslaught of constant bullying. When the unthinkable happens and he falls victim to a cruel prank, he and a small circle of friends band together to form a Losers’ Club. By embracing the name their tormentors have assigned them, they reclaim their power and try to fight back. With the help of a mysterious stranger, Jacob finds the strength he needs to stand up for himself and his friends, a group of losers like himself.

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andrew potter

2013 Rainbow Awards Submission: Grigory Ryzhakov - Becoming Agie

Becoming Agie by Grigory Ryzhakov
Paperback: 112 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (December 28, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 148029893X
ISBN-13: 978-1480298934
Amazon: Becoming Agie: The Adventure of a Russian transgender scientist entangled in fiction, romance and mystery
Amazon Kindle: Becoming Agie: The Adventure of a Russian transgender scientist entangled in fiction, romance and mystery

"Becoming Agie" consists of two novellas about a M->F transsexual scientist called Agie. In "Usher Syndrome" she opens her heart to someone who would accept her for what she is. But her destiny has other plans and Agie has to fight for her love in the most challenging and unexpected way. In "Pumpkin Day" Agie tries to solve a mysterious disappearance of a giant pumpkin into a cavern beneath Slown City. Meanwhile, a lonely, well-to-do man called Jake has to choose between courage and prejudice to pursue his love interest. A lost notebook brings the two lives together. "Usher Syndrome" was adapted for stage and performed at London’s Barons Court Theatre in 2010.

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