July 11th, 2013

andrew potter

Gale Wilhelm, Helen Hope Rudolph Page & Kathleen Huebner

Gale Wilhelm (April 6, 1908 – July 11, 1991) was an American writer most noted for two books that featured lesbian themes written in the 1930s: We Too Are Drifting and Torchlight to Valhalla (also published as The Strange Path).

Wilhelm was born in Eugene, Oregon of Ethel Gale Brewer and Wilson Price Wilhelm in 1908. She was the youngest of five children, educated in Oregon, Idaho, and Washington. The family moved to San Francisco, California when Wilhelm was a teenager.

Wilhelm published several short stories in 1934 and 1935, her first appearing in Literary America. With the assistance of a literary agent, Wilhelm published We Too Are Drifting in 1935 by Random House, to many favorable reviews.

In 1938, Random House published Torchlight to Valhalla, another lesbian-themed novel in which the protagonist, a young woman, is pursued by a very handsome and charming young man, but realizes her true happiness is with another young woman.

Wilhelm wrote three more novels, Bring Home the Bride in 1940, The Time Between in 1942 and Never Let Me Go in 1945, all with heterosexual themes. Never Let Me Go included praise from Wilhelm's friend Carl Sandburg on the book jacket.

Wilhelm also published stories in Colliers and Yale Review in the early 1940s, but didn't publish anything new after 1943. However, both Wilhelm's lesbian themed books were reprinted many times in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Torchlight to Valhalla was given a new name, The Strange Path, with a rather salacious cover in 1953.


Gale Wilhelm and Helen Hope Rudolph Page
Gale Wilhelm was an American writer noted for two books that featured lesbian themes written in the 1930s: We Too Are Drifting and Torchlight to Valhalla. Wilhelm lived with Helen Hope Rudolph Page in San Francisco from 1938 until Page's death in the late 1940s.  She lived with Kathleen Huebner from 1953 until Wilhelm's death in 1991 of cancer. Barbara Grier speculated that Wilhelm stopped writing before she turned 40 years old because "the world would not let her write the books she wanted."

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gale_Wilhelm
The concept of the “tragic” male invert was so pliable that Americans Charles Henri Ford and Parker Tyler, in their 1933 The Young and the Evil, made him the center of a quirky, madcap romance. Published in Paris because of its blithe acceptance of homosexual sex and comic tone, the novel was banned for years in the United States and Great Britain, where customs offices confiscated and burned copies. Lesbian and gay male themes also surfaced in popular American novels, such as Nella Larsen’s 1929 Passing and Blair Niles’s 1931 Strange Brother, both set in Harlem, and Gale Wilhelm’s critically acclaimed We Too Are Drifting (1934) and Torchlight to Valhalla (1938). Gay male themes were prevalent in lowbrow novels, such as André Tellier’s 1931 Twilight Men and Lew Levenson’s 1934 Butterfly Man, but also in more literary works, such as Kay Boyle’s 1933 Gentlemen, I Address You Privately and Djuna Barnes’s 1936 Nightwood. --Bronski, Michael (2011-05-10). A Queer History of the United States (Revisioning American History) (Kindle Locations 2727-2738). Beacon Press. Kindle Edition.
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Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Giorgio Armani (born July 11, 1934)

Giorgio Armani (born 11 July 1934) is an Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear. He is known today for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $8.5 billion as of 2013.

Armani was born in the northern Italian town of Piacenza, where he was raised with older brother Sergio and younger sister Rosanna by his mother Maria Raimondi and father Ugo Armani. Armani aspired to a career in medicine after reading A. J. Cronin's The Citadel, and enrolled in the Department of Medicine at the University of Milan. In 1953, after three years he broke off his studies, and joined the army, because of his medical studies, he was promoted and transferred to an infirmary in Verona. After experiencing hospital life and occasional evenings at the Arena in Verona, he decided to find a different career.

After his stint in the armed forces, Armani found a job as a window dresser at La Rinascente, a department store in Milan. He went on to become a seller for the menswear department, in which capacity he gained valuable experience in the marketing aspect of the fashion industry. In the mid-1960s, Armani moved to the Nino Cerruti company, for which he designed menswear. His skills were in demand, and for the next decade, while continuing to work for Cerutti, Armani also freelanced, contributing designs to as many as ten manufacturers at a time. In the late 1960s, Armani met Sergio Galeotti, an architectural draftsman, which marked the beginning of a personal and professional relationship that lasted for many years. In 1973, Galeotti persuaded him to open a design office in Milan, at 37 corso Venezia. This led to a period of extensive collaboration, during which Armani worked as a freelance designer for a number of fashion houses, including Allegri, Bagutta, Hilton, Sicons, Gibò, Montedoro, and Tendresse. The international press was quick to acknowledge Armani's importance following the runway shows at the Sala Bianca in the Pitti Palace in Florence. The experience provided Armani with an opportunity to develop his own style in new ways. He was now ready to devote his energy to his own label, and in 1975 he founded Giorgio Armani S.p.A. in Milan, with his friend Galeotti. In October of that same year, he presented his first collection of men's ready-to-wear for Spring and Summer 1976 under his own name. He also produced a women's line for the same season.


Jacket and trousers, 1990
This evening ensemble consists of black chiffon and organza trousers and a jacket lined with white chiffon with sequinned detail on the jacket. It was designed by Georgio Armani in Milan in 1990
Top and skirt, 1990
Printed silk two-piece evening dress with ruffled skirt and spaghetti-strap bodice. Blue-on-pale yellow printed silk spaghetti-strap top and ankle length skirt almost completely covered in massed self-ruffles with scalloped edges.
Trouser suit, 1990
Evening trouser suit consisting of a Nehru style jacket in black net over printed silk, and black and white printed silk trousers entirely covered in clear square sequins.


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Armani

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More Fashion Designers at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art


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andrew potter

Sir Arthur John Evans (July 8, 1851 – July 11, 1941)

Sir Arthur John Evans (8 July 1851 – 11 July 1941) was a British archaeologist most famous for unearthing the palace of Knossos on the Greek island of Crete and for developing the concept of Minoan civilization from the structures and artifacts found there and elsewhere throughout eastern Mediterranean. Evans was the first to define Cretan scripts Linear A and Linear B, as well as an earlier pictographic writing. (in the picture: Arthur Evans by Sir William Richmond, 1907, (Ashmolean Museum WA 1907.2))

Along with Heinrich Schliemann, Evans was a pioneer in the study of Aegean civilization in the Bronze Age. The two men knew of each other and Evans visited Schliemann's sites. Schliemann had planned to excavate at Knossos, but died before fulfilling that dream. Evans bought the site and stepped in to take charge of the project that was then still in its infancy. He continued Schliemann's concept of Mycenaean civilization but soon found that he needed to distinguish it from his own concept - the Minoan.

Arthur Evans was born in Nash Mills, England, the first child of John Evans and Harriet Ann Dickinson. John Evans came from a family of men who were both educated and intellectually active; his father, Arthur's grandfather, had been headmaster of Market Bosworth Grammar School. John knew Latin and could quote the classical authors. In 1840, instead of going to college, he started work at a paper mill owned by his maternal uncle John Dickinson. He married his cousin and employer's daughter, Harriet, and in 1851 was made a full partner in the family business. Profits from the mill would eventually help fund Arthur's excavations and restorations at Knossos and resulting publications.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Evans

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andrew potter

Tom Waddell, Charles Deaton, Zohn Artman & Sara Lewinstein

Dr. Tom Waddell (November 1, 1937 - July 11, 1987) was a gay American sportsman who founded the Gay Olympics in 1982 in San Francisco. The international sporting event was later renamed the Gay Games after the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) sued Waddell for using the word "Olympic" in the original name. The Gay Games are held every four years. In 1981, while founding the Gay Games, Waddell met two people with whom he formed major relationships. One was public relations man and fundraiser Zohn Artman, with whom he fell in love and began a relationship. The other was lesbian athlete Sara Lewinstein. Both Tom and Sara had longed to have a child, and they decided to have a child together. Their daughter, Jessica, was born in 1983.

Waddell was born Thomas Flubacher in Paterson, New Jersey to a Catholic German-American family. His parents separated when he was in his teens, and at the age of fifteen he went to live with Gene and Hazel Waddell, for whom he did chores; they adopted him six years later. The Waddells were former vaudeville acrobats and encouraged Tom to take up gymnastics. [Gene Waddell is one of the men in the famous photograph of acrobats balancing atop the Empire State Building.] Aware of his homosexual feelings in high school, Tom excelled in athletics as a means to compensate for them. (Picture: Tom, Sara and Jessica)

Waddell attended Springfield College in Massachusetts on a track scholarship. Originally majoring in physical education, he switched to pre-medicine following the sudden death of his best friend and co-captain of the gymnastics team, an event that moved him deeply. At Springfield, he competed on the gymnastics and football teams. In the summer of 1959, Tom worked at a children's camp in western Massachusetts, where he met his first lover, socialist Enge Menaker, then a 63-year-old man. They remained close for the rest of Menaker's life, which ended in 1985 when he was ninety years old.


Zohn Artman & Tom Waddell by Lisa Kanemoto
"
About my homosexuality - I feel privileged. Sometimes I think I'm experiencing twice as much living as others who have not liberated themselves. Soon, perhaps, we can drop the labels, when we all realize that sexuality is not black and white, but a marvelous nuance.
"
Dr. Tom Waddell (November 1, 1937 - July 11, 1987) was an American sportsman who founded the Gay Olympics in 1982 in San Francisco. The international sporting event was later renamed Gay Games after the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) sued Waddell for using the word "Olympic" in the original name. The Gay Games are held every four years. In 1981, while founding the Gay Games, Waddell met public relations man and fundraiser Zohn Artman, with whom he fell in love and began a relationship.


AIDS Quilt

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Waddell

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More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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andrew potter

Pai Hsien-Yung (born July 11, 1937)

Kenneth Hsien-yung Pai (born July 11, 1937) is a writer who has been described as a "melancholy pioneer." He was born in Guilin, Guangxi, China at the cusp of both the Second Sino-Japanese War and subsequent Chinese Civil War. Pai's father was the famous Kuomintang (KMT) general Bai Chongxi (Pai Chung-hsi), whom he later described as a "stern, Confucian father" with "some soft spots in his heart." Pai was diagnosed with tuberculosis at the age of seven, during which time he would have to live in a separate house from his siblings (of which he would have a total of nine). He lived with his family in Chongqing, Shanghai, and Nanjing before moving to the British-controlled Hong Kong in 1948 as CPC forces turned the tide of the Chinese Civil War. In 1952, Pai and his family resettled in Taiwan, where the KMT had relocated the Republic of China (Taiwan) after Japan's defeat in 1945.

Pai studied in La Salle College, a Hong Kong Catholic boys high school, until he left for Taiwan with his family. In 1956, Pai enrolled at National Cheng Kung University as a hydraulic engineering major, because he wanted to participate in the Three Gorges Dam Project. The following year, he passed the entrance examination for the foreign literature department of National Taiwan University and transferred there to study English literature. In September 1958, after completing his freshman year of study, he published his first short story "Madame Ching" in the magazine Literature. Two years later, he collaborated with several NTU classmates — e.g., Chen Ruoxi, Wang Wenxing, Ouyang Tzu — to launch Modern Literature (Xiandai wenxue), in which many of his early works were published. He was also known to frequent the Cafe Astoria in Taipei.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pai_Hsien-Yung

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