January 1st, 2014

andrew potter

Bruce King (1925 - January 1, 1993)

A dancer, choreographer, and teacher, Bruce King performed with Merce Cunningham from 1955 to 1958 and went on to choreograph independently for his own company in the 1970s. He served as an artist-in-residence at various universities and taught regularly at Adelphi University and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. He died from AIDS-related causes.


Bruce King (second from left) with Viola Farber, Remy Charlip, Carolyn Brown, and Merce Cunningham in Cunningham's Nocturnes (1956). Photo: Louis A. Stevenson Jr., courtesy of Cunningham Dance Foundation.

Source: http://www.artistswithaids.org/artforms/dance/catalogue/king.html

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Cat & Jennifer Cora

Catherine Ann "Cat" Cora (born January 1, 1968) is an American professional chef best known for her featured role as an "Iron Chef" on the Food Network television show Iron Chef America and as co-host of Around the World in 80 Plates on Bravo. Cora has four sons – Zoran, Caje, Thatcher, and Nash – with her wife, Jennifer. Jennifer bore the first three; Cat gave birth to Nash three months after Thatcher was born. She currently resides in the Santa Barbara, California area with her family. "We met 11 years ago (as of 2010) skiing in Lake Tahoe. It was on my birthday. We knew instantly. I never believed in that, but I knew right away that we were kindred spirits. We spent the next seven months together. We didn’t spend a day apart. She was working as a nanny at the time and had to go to Europe to travel with a family. When she got back about a month later, we moved in together. We had a ceremony in Napa about two years after we met." (P: @Greg Hernandez, Cat Cora in April 2010)

Cora was born in Jackson, Mississippi, the daughter of Virginia Lee (née Brothers) and Spiro Pete Cora. Her father was of Greek descent (her paternal grandparents were from Skopelos, Greece). Her grandfather and father were both restaurateurs. When she was 15 years old, she brought a business plan to her father and grandfather, knowing they could help her. Cora's style of cooking was influenced by Julia Child, Barbara Tropp, M.F.K. Fisher and her grandmother, Alma.

After receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Physiology and Biology at the University of Southern Mississippi, she enrolled at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Cora has appeared on Simplify Your Life. She was also a co-host of the Food Network show Kitchen Accomplished.

In January 2005 Cora co-founded Chefs For Humanity, which describes itself as "a grassroots coalition of chefs and culinary professionals guided by a mission to quickly be able to raise funds and provide resources for important emergency and humanitarian aid, nutritional education, and hunger-related initiatives throughout the world." She has also participated in charity wine auctions held by Auction Napa Valley.


Cat Cora is a professional chef best known for her featured role as an "Iron Chef" on the Food Network television show Iron Chef America and as co-host of Around the World in 80 Plates on Bravo. Cora has four sons – Zoran, Caje, Thatcher, and Nash. "We met 11 years ago (as of 2010) skiing in Lake Tahoe. It was on my birthday. We knew instantly. I never believed in that, but I knew right away that we were kindred spirits. We spent the next seven months together. We didn’t spend a day apart."

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_Cora

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Cesar Romero (February 15, 1907 – January 1, 1994)

Cesar "Butch“ Romero played the Latin lover in countless films of the 1930s, ’40s, and '50s. His credits include roles in The Thin Man, The Good Fairy, The Cisco Kid and the Lady, Tales of Manhattan, and Lust in the Dust. During the ’60s he appeared as the Joker in the TV show Batman. (Picture: Cesar Romero by Carl Van Vechten)

Romero never married, but he was often engaged as an escort for actresses and models attending Hollywood functions. As Barbara STANWYCK once said, "I just call good ol’ Butch Romero and he says rather reluctantly, ‘Well if you have to go, I’ll take you.’ He does that for all of us old broads.“

In an interview. Romero described a tryst with actor Desi Arnaz: "Desi said ‘one time only.’ For our friendship. Neither of us made a big deal out of it, excuse the pun, and we never referred to it again.“

Cesar Julio Romero, Jr. (February 15, 1907 – January 1, 1994) was an American film and television actor who was active in film, radio, and television for almost sixty years. His wide range of screen roles included Latin lovers, historical figures in costume dramas, characters in light domestic comedies, and as the Joker in the Batman TV series.

Romero was born in New York City, the son of Maria Mantilla and Cesar Julio Romero. His father was a native of Italy and was an importer-exporter of sugar refining machinery, and his mother was a Cuban concert singer. That lifestyle, however, changed dramatically when his parents lost their sugar import business and suffered losses in the Stock Market Crash of 1929. Romero's Hollywood earnings allowed him to support his large family, all of whom followed him to the West Coast years later. Romero lived on and off with various family members, especially his sister, for the rest of his life.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cesar_Romero,_Jr.

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Dan Siminoski (born January 1, 1947)

Dan Siminoski was born in Los Angeles on January 1, 1947, to a progressive family. He displayed his commitment to human rights at an early age, when he co-chaired Mid-City Youth Against Proposition 14, a state-wide initiative to invalidate the California Fair Housing Law. He studied at the University of California at Berkeley, where he was involved in the Free Speech and anti-war movements and became the Berkeley co-chairman of Senator Eugene McCarthy's presidential campaign; he received a BA in Political Science and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1968. Before entering graduate school, Siminoski served as a staff investigator for the Fair Campaign Practices Committee in Washington, DC, and then as legislative aid to Senator Wayne Morse. He earned his MA with honors in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1970, when he was also awarded a Ford Fellowship. His doctoral research brought Siminoski back to Los Angeles where he came out in 1973 and became active in gay rights causes. In 1976-1977, he was an Instructor in the Social Sciences Department at Long Beach City College. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1978. In 1979-1980, he was Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Arizona State University, and in 1980-1981, he held the same position at the University of Missouri St. Louis. He was appointed Visiting Lecturer in Political Science at Texas Tech University in 1981.

His long-held interest in gay and lesbian civil rights led Siminoski to file a request with the Federal Bureau of Investigation under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) on October 22, 1982, for copies of all FBI Headquarters and field office records relating to the surveillance of gays and lesbians from 1950 to 1982. When the FBI failed to comply with the request fully and in a timely manner, Siminoski, represented by the ACLU Foundation of Southern California, filed suit against the Bureau in Federal District Court in Los Angeles, on October 11, 1983. Simultaneously, Siminoski, who had left teaching and moved to Los Angeles in the late summer of 1983 to devote himself full-time to the impending lawsuit, launched Siminoski vs. FBI 1984 , a speaking tour and media campaign to publicize his case.

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Source: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt2h4nd1mq/

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George Yabu & Glenn Pushelberg

Yabu Pushelberg is an international interior design firm, with studios in Toronto and SoHo, New York, founded in 1980 by Glenn Pushelberg and George Yabu. Seven teams of design and project management personnel specialize in interior and furniture design for the hospitality and retail industries. The firm also does residential projects.

Yabu Pushelberg has designed the interiors for the Four Seasons in Toronto and Tokyo; the W Hotel, Times Square, New York; the St. Regis Hotel, San Francisco and Bal Harbour; the Viceroy Maldives Resort; the Edition Hotels & Las Alcobas, Mexico City.

Retail projects include Bergdorf Goodman, New York; Barneys New York; Louis Vuitton, Hong Kong; Lane Crawford Home, Hong Kong; Printemps, Paris; and Tiffany & Co. Ltd, Wall Street, New York.

In 2010, Yabu Pushelberg opened an office in Guangzhou, China.

Yabu Pushelberg also designs furniture for companies such as the Toronto and New York retailer Avenue Road Furniture.

They focus on the use of contemporary art in their projects, commissioning artists to create large-scale installations, including Toronto's Dennis Lin and Montrealer Pascale Girardin.

Yabu Pushelberg supports charities including New York’s Hetrick Martin Foundation for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth and have organized a major fundraiser for Toronto’s Casey House Foundation.

In 2003, George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg received honorary doctorates from Ryerson University. They also established a major endowed scholarship at the university for a fourth-year student whose projects demonstrate innovative critical thinking and creative problem solving skills.


photo © Richard Powers
Yabu Pushelberg is an international interior design firm, with studios in Toronto and SoHo, New York, founded in 1980 by Glenn Pushelberg & George Yabu. George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg received the Order of Canada for their contributions to design excellence internationally, in December, 2013. They were named by Town & Country magazine as two of the 101 People You Must Meet in 2011 and by Condé Nast Traveler magazine as the “Hot Interior Design Firm” of 2011.


photo © Richard Powers

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yabu_Pushelberg

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James Hormel & Michael Nguyen

As heir to the Hormel Ham fortune, James Catherwood Hormel (born January 1, 1933) has supported numerous homosexual causes, including National Gay Rights Advocates and AIDS-related projects. He underwrote the run of Angels in America in San Francisco. (P: Photographs taken by Doug Menuez for the San Francisco Examiner Magazine's article on James C. Hormel appearing June 8, 1996)

A practicing attorney in the 1960s, Hormel served for six years as the dean of students at the University of Chicago Law School. Considered by President Bill Clinton for the position of Ambassador to Fiji. he was passed over to avoid stirring up controversy in the newly Republican Senate in 1994. Clinton did appoint him Ambassador to Luxembourg in 1999, in a recess appointment, and he became the first openly gay man to represent the United States as an ambassador. His partner since 1995, Timothy Wu, held the Bible on which Hormel swore his oath of office.

James Catherwood Hormel (born January 1, 1933) is an American philanthropist and grandson of George A. Hormel, founder of Hormel Foods (producers of Spam and other processed meat products).

Hormel was born in Austin, Minnesota. He earned a B.A. in history (1955) from Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania and a law degree (1958) from the University of Chicago Law School where he later served as dean of students and director of admissions. In 1981 he was one of the founders of the Human Rights Campaign. He was a member of the 1995 United Nations Commission on Human Rights and the 1996 U.S. delegation to the United Nations General Assembly, and the boards of directors of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and the American Foundation for AIDS Research. Hormel funded the creation of James C. Hormel Gay & Lesbian Center at the San Francisco Public Library in 1995. It is the gateway to collections documenting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) history and culture, with a special emphasis on the San Francisco Bay Area.


As heir to the Hormel Ham fortune, James Catherwood Hormel (born January 1, 1933) has supported numerous homosexual causes, including National Gay Rights Advocates and AIDS-related projects. He underwrote the run of Angels in America in San Francisco. Hormel has five children, fourteen grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. He lives in San Francisco, California with his life partner since 2006, Michael P. Nguyen. Mr. Nguyen is also an alumnus of Swarthmore College, class of 2008.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Hormel

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John Dorr (1944 - January 1, 1993)

John Dorr, founder of EZTV, was a graduate of Yale who did his postgraduate studies in film at UCLA. He was a widely published film journalist and a noted scholar of D.W. Griffith. For years he was a reviewer for The Hollywood Reporter. With the advent of industrial video technology in the late 70s, Dorr saw a window opening on the future. Anticipating the desktop revolution, he foresaw a time when "films" could be made by independent artists without reliance on the studio system or heavy funding. He knew that these artists would need a public venue to exhibit and distribute their work. This he would call EZTV.

Dorr began by testing his own hypothesis. In 1978 he borrowed a black & white surveillance camera and made the wacky "Sudzall Does It All," the first known video feature. He followed this with "The Case of the Missing Consciousness," a tongue-in-cheek science fiction feature, this time in color. Between 1980 and 1982, working only on some weekends, Dorr produced his masterwork, the feature-length biography of the troubled relationship between writer Dorothy Parker and her bisexual husband Alan Campbell, "Dorothy and Alan at Norma Place."

In April, 1982, Dorr opened the first EZTV premises with a screening of "Dorothy and Alan." Both the work and the EZTV concept received rave reviews. EZTV was on its way. A cooperative of artists and equipment formed around Dorr. In the ensuing years literally thousands of tapes were produced, post-produced or exhibited out of EZTV, as well as countless live and multimedia performances. John Dorr and EZTV became a unique staple of the L. A. art scene.

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Source: http://www.eztvmedia.com/dorr.html

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Katherine Ragsdale & Mally Lloyd

Katherine Hancock Ragsdale (born c. 1959) is an American Episcopal Priest based in Massachusetts and president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School. Before becoming dean she was director of Political Research Associates from May 2005 through June 2009. On January 1, 2011, she married Rev. Mally Lloyd at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston. Bishop M. Thomas Shaw performed the ceremony. "The couple met on June 30, 2008, at the urging of a mutual friend," recounted the release. "At the time, Canon Lloyd, 57, said, ’We were both travelling a lot and so we would talk by phone. And somehow when you talk a lot by phone, a relationship can go deeper more quickly than when you spend time in person. At least that is what happened to us.’ "

She is an American progressive, and was a priest at St. David's Episcopal Church in Pepperell, part of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. Ragsdale has served for 17 years on the national board of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She is also on the board of NARAL Pro-Choice America, The White House Project, the Progressive Religious Partnership, as well as the bi-national advisory board of the Center for the Prevention of Sexual and Domestic Violence. She presented to the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary on behalf of NARAL Pro-Choice America and the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice in 2004.

She was named president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School on July 1, 2009. Her appointment was criticized by some religious conservatives, who have been particularly critical of her endorsement of the "blessing" of abortion.

She is the editor of Boundary Wars: Intimacy and Distance in Healing Relationships and the author of numerous articles, including The Role of Religious Institutions in Responding to the Domestic Violence Crisis and Hannah, a short story.


Katherine Ragsdaleis an Episcopal Priest based in Massachusetts and president of Episcopal Divinity School. Before becoming dean she was director of Political Research Associates from May 2005 through June 2009. On January 1, 2011, she married Rev. Mally Lloyd at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston. "The couple met on June 30, 2008, at the urging of a mutual friend," recounted the release. "At the time, Canon Lloyd, 57, said, ’We were both travelling a lot and so we would talk by phone."

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Hancock_Ragsdale

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Mary Ann Willson & Sarah Brundage

Mary Ann Willson was unknown until 1943, when a New York art gallery discovered a portfolio of her drawings. Mary Ann Willson is now regarded as one of the earliest American watercolorists, along with Eunice Pinney of Connecticut. (P: "The Tow Sisters," by Mary Ann Willson. Early nineteenth century.)

An anonymous letter written in 1850 and signed by "an admirer of art" accompanied the drawings. It relates that Willson and a Miss Brundage moved to Greenville, New York, in about 1810. The two women pioneers built a log cabin, and while Brundage farmed the land, Willson painted pictures that she sold to nearby farmers. The letter claims that her watercolors were sold from Canada to Mobile, Alabama.

Willson used brightly colored paints made from berry juice, vegetable dyes, and brick dust. Untrained, she drew images from popular prints in a bold, simple style. Her series of scenes from the tale of the Prodigal Son illustrates a story popular among American settlers.

At the death of Brundage, Willson is said to have been inconsolable and to have disappeared shortly afterward. The last of her known works was completed in 1825.

Willson's story served as the basis for Alma Routsong's 1969 novel Patience and Sarah.

[This is an excerpt from the interactive companion program to the videodisc American Art from the National Gallery of Art. Produced by the Department of Education Resources, this teaching resource is one of the Gallery's free-loan educational programs.]

Source: www.nga.gov/content/ngaweb/Collection/artist-info.2808.html#artist-info.2808.html

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Herb Donaldson (February 12, 1927 – December 5 2008)

Herb Donaldson was an openly gay San Francisco lawyer who gained national attention for his efforts to legally block San Francisco police from harassing attendees of a fund-raising ball for the Council on Religion and the Homosexual, an early homophile organization, on January 1, 1965.

On the eve of January 1, 1965, several homophile organizations in San Francisco, California - including the Council on Religion and the Homosexual, the Society for Individual Rights, the Daughters of Bilitis, and the Mattachine Society - organized a fund-raising ball for their mutual benefit to be held at the California Hall. Prior to the ball, several of the ministers from the Council on Religion met with the San Francisco police, who tried to get them to cancel it. The clergy members declined to cancel the event, and the San Francisco police initially agreed not to interfere. However, on the evening of the ball, the police showed up in force and surrounded the California Hall and focused numerous kleig lights on the entrance to the hall. As each of the 600 plus persons entering the ball approached the entrance, the police took their photographs. A number of police paddy wagons were parked in plain view near the entrance to the ball.

Evander Smith, a lawyer for the groups organizing the ball, and Herb Donaldson tried to stop the police from conducting the fourth "inspection" of the evening; both were arrested, along with two heterosexual lawyers - Elliott Leighton and Nancy May - who were supporting the rights of the participants to gather at the ball.

On January 2, 1965, ministers associated associated with the Council on Religion and the Homosexual held a news conference in protest of Smith, Donaldson, and the other two lawyers arrested as well as the police harassment to which the ball attendees had been subjected. Twenty-five of the most prominent lawyers in San Francisco joined the defense team for the four lawyers, and the judge directed the jury to find the four not-guilty before the defense had even had a chance to begin their argumentation when the case came to court.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herb_Donaldson_(lawyer)

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Richard Amory (October 18, 1927 – January 1, 1981)

Richard Wallace Love was born on October 18, 1927 in Halfway, Oregon, near the border of Idaho. He was the third of four children in his family. Both his parents were teachers, and both came from families that had lived in Oregon since the frontier days of the 1800s.

In the 1930s, his family packed everything and moved to the Midwest. When his father began graduate school at Ohio State University, he moved the family from Oregon to Columbus, Ohio. Richard grew up in the North Columbus neighborhood of Clinton Park, attending Clinton Elementary School and University High School.

While a teenager, Richard spent a summer away in Arizona. There in the southwest, he developed a passionate interest in Native American culture. This fascination, which nourished much of his literature, would continue throughout his life. After graduating with the University High School Class of 1945, Richard enlisted in the Coast Guard. He fully expected to face military combat in the South Pacific, but while he was still in basic training, the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending World War II.

After the war, Richard returned to Columbus and enrolled at Ohio State University, where he graduated with a degree in sociology, but was forced to return to the military life when drafted by the U.S. Army. Afterwards, when finally free of military obligations, he left the United States for Mexico City, where he studied anthropology.

Upon his return to America, Richard settled in California. In 1956, he began work as a schoolteacher in the Salinas Valley town of Soledad, where he taught at the Main Street School. One year later, at the age of thirty, he married and started a family. The first of his three children was born in 1958.


Cover by Robert Bonfils

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Source: http://www.authorrichardamory.com/
I found Song of the Loon by Richard Amory on a list of recommended titles from the history of gay lit. Published in 1966, this book was considered very daring and ahead of its time. It is not great literature, but it is an idyllic, almost innocent, if lusty frontier romance, in which 19th century outdoorsman Ephraim MacIver travels and makes sweet, sweaty man love across the American frontier. It's incredibly romantic. If Walt Whitman had written a novel, it might have been like this. --Lynn Flewelling
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Stephen Harvey (1949 - January 1, 1993)

Stephen Harvey was an associate curator of film at the New York City's Museum of Modern Art and author of Directed by Vincente Minnelli. He died on January 1, 1993. He was 43 and lived in Brooklyn.

Mr. Harvey died of AIDS-related complications, said Mary Lea Bandy, the director of the department of film at the museum.

A film curator at the Museum of Modern Art since 1972, Mr. Harvey had organized major retrospectives and programs on such film figures as Vincente Minnelli, Vittorio de Sica and Joseph Mankiewicz.

His book, "Directed by Vincente Minnelli," published in 1990 by HarperCollins, is widely considered the definitive study of Mr. Minnelli and the MGM studio system of his time.

Mr. Harvey's retrospective on the film director Michael Curtiz was on exhibit at the museum, and at the time of his death he was preparing a retrospective of films based on works by Henry James to coincide with the James sesquicentennial in 1993.

Mr. Harvey also wrote essays and critical commentary for newspapers, Film Comment and other publications on films. He was a film critic for Inquiry magazine and a theater critic for The Nation.



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Source: http://www.nytimes.com/1993/01/04/nyregion/stephen-harvey-43-a-writer-on-movies-and-a-film-curator.html

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It happened today: January 1

Andrew Holleran (born January 1, 1944): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/1401351.html

Andrew Holleran is a novelist, essayist, and short story writer. He is a prominent novelist of post-Stonewall gay literature. In Grief, reeling from the death of his mother, an exhausted, lonely professor comes to our nation's capital to escape his previous life. What he finds there - in his handsome, solitary landlord; in the city's somber mood and sepulchral architecture; and in the strange and impassioned journals of Mary Todd Lincoln - shows him unexpected truths about America and loss.

Bruce King (1925 - January 1, 1993): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3414078.html

A dancer, choreographer, and teacher, Bruce King performed with Merce Cunningham from 1955 to 1958 and went on to choreograph independently for his own company in the 1970s. He served as an artist-in-residence at various universities and taught regularly at Adelphi University and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. He died from AIDS-related causes. He was with Viola Farber, Remy Charlip, Carolyn Brown, and Merce Cunningham in Cunningham's Nocturnes (1956).

Cat Cora (born January 1, 1968): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3989430.html

Cat Cora is a professional chef best known for her featured role as an "Iron Chef" on the Food Network television show Iron Chef America and as co-host of Around the World in 80 Plates on Bravo. Cora has four sons – Zoran, Caje, Thatcher, and Nash. "We met 11 years ago (as of 2010) skiing in Lake Tahoe. It was on my birthday. We knew instantly. I never believed in that, but I knew right away that we were kindred spirits. We spent the next seven months together. We didn’t spend a day apart."

Cesar Romero (February 15, 1907 – January 1, 1994): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3413611.html

Cesar Romero played the Latin lover in countless films of the 1930s, ’40s, and '50s. His credits include The Thin Man, The Good Fairy, The Cisco Kid and the Lady, Tales of Manhattan, and Lust in the Dust. During the ’60s he appeared as the Joker in the TV show Batman. Romero was often engaged as an escort for actresses. As Barbara Stanwyck once said, "I just call good ol’ Butch Romero and he says rather reluctantly, ‘Well if you have to go, I’ll take you.’ He does that for all of us old broads.“

Dan Siminoski (born January 1, 1947): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3414371.html

Dan Siminoski was born in Los Angeles on January 1, 1947, to a progressive family. His interest in gay and lesbian civil rights led Siminoski to file a request with the FBI under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) on October 22, 1982, for copies of all FBI Headquarters and field office records relating to the surveillance of gays and lesbians from 1950 to 1982. When the FBI failed to comply with the request fully and in a timely manner, Siminoski filed suit against the FBI.

E.M. Forster (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2864259.html

E.M. Forster developed a long-term loving relationship with Bob Buckingham, a married policeman, whom he met in 1930. Buckingham was 28, Forster 51, when the two met. Bob's wife, May, became Foster's friend and nursemaid. Forster included the couple in his circle. Forster died of a stroke in Coventry on 7 June 1970 at the age of 91, at the home of the Buckinghams. "A happy ending was imperative" Forster writes in "Maurice"'s Terminal Notes, even though Maurice says: "All the world's against us"

Marie Louise Habets (January 1905 - May 1986): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3989623.html

Kathryn Hulme (July 6, 1900 - August 25, 1981) was an American author and memoirist most noted for her novel The Nun's Story. The book is often, mistakenly, understood to be semi-biographical. After the war, she spent six years in Germany as deputy director of United Nations Relief and Refugee Association field teams. While there, Hulme met and befriended Marie-Louise Habets, a Belgian nurse and former nun. From 1960 until her death, Hulme resided on the island of Kauai with Marie-Louise Habets.

George Yabu & Glenn Pushelberg: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3801103.html

Yabu Pushelberg is an international interior design firm, with studios in Toronto and SoHo, New York, founded in 1980 by Glenn Pushelberg & George Yabu. George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg received the Order of Canada for their contributions to design excellence internationally, in December, 2013. They were named by Town & Country magazine as two of the 101 People You Must Meet in 2011 and by Condé Nast Traveler magazine as the “Hot Interior Design Firm” of 2011.

Herb Donaldson: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3990516.html

Herb Donaldson was an openly gay San Francisco lawyer who gained national attention for his efforts to legally block San Francisco police from harassing attendees of a fund-raising ball for the Council on Religion and the Homosexual, an early homophile organization, on January 1, 1965. This event has been called the "San Francisco's Stonewall" by some historians; the participation of such prominent litigators marked a turning point in gay rights on the West Coast of the United States.

James Hormel (born January 1, 1933): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3413917.html

As heir to the Hormel Ham fortune, James Catherwood Hormel has supported numerous homosexual causes, including National Gay Rights Advocates and AIDS-related projects. He underwrote the run of Angels in America in San Francisco. He became the first openly gay man to represent the United States as an ambassador. Hormel has five children, fourteen grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. He lives in San Francisco, California with his life partner since 2006, Michael P. Nguyen.

John Dorr (1944 - January 1, 1993): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3414591.html

John Dorr, founder of EZTV, was a Yale graduate who did his postgraduate studies in film at UCLA. He was a widely published film journalist and a noted scholar of D.W. Griffith. For years he was a reviewer for The Hollywood Reporter. With the advent of industrial video technology in the late 70s, Dorr saw a window opening on the future. Anticipating the desktop revolution, he foresaw a time when "films" could be made by independent artists without reliance on the studio system or heavy funding.

Katherine Ragsdale & Mally Lloyd: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3989829.html

Katherine Ragsdaleis an Episcopal Priest based in Massachusetts and president of Episcopal Divinity School. Before becoming dean she was director of Political Research Associates from May 2005 through June 2009. On January 1, 2011, she married Rev. Mally Lloyd at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston. "The couple met on June 30, 2008, at the urging of a mutual friend," recounted the release. "At the time, Canon Lloyd, 57, said, ’We were both travelling a lot and so we would talk by phone."

Mary Ann Willson & Sarah Brundage: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3990160.html

Mary Ann Willson was unknown until 1943, when a New York art gallery discovered a portfolio of her drawings. She is now regarded as one of the earliest American watercolorists. Willson and a Miss Brundage moved to Greenville, New York, in about 1810. The two women pioneers built a log cabin, and while Brundage farmed the land, Willson painted pictures that she sold to nearby farmers. At the death of Brundage, Willson is said to have been inconsolable and to have disappeared shortly afterward.

Neil Bartlett (born January 1, 1958): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/1402000.html

Neil Vivian Bartlett, OBE, (born 1958) is an award-winning British director, performer, translator, and writer. He is the author of: Who Was That Man: A Present for Mr. Oscar Wilde (1988), Ready to Catch Him Should He Fall (1992), Mr. Clive and Mr. Page (1996), Skin Lane (2007), "When the Time Comes; or, the Case of the Man Who Didn't Know" (short story). Who Was That Man shows how the gay history of London in the 1890s affects Bartlett's life as a gay man in London in the 1980s.

Richard Amory (October 18, 1927 – January 1, 1981): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2521894.html

I found Song of the Loon by Amory on a list of recommended titles from the history of gay lit. Published in 1966, this book was considered very daring and ahead of its time. It is not great literature, but it is an idyllic, almost innocent, if lusty frontier romance, in which 19th century outdoorsman Ephraim MacIver travels and makes sweet, sweaty man love across the American frontier. It's incredibly romantic. If Walt Whitman had written a novel, it might have been like this. --Lynn Flewelling

Stephen Harvey (1949 - January 1, 1993): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3414919.html

Stephen Harvey (1949 - January 1, 1993) was an associate curator of film at the New York City's Museum of Modern Art and author of Directed by Vincente Minnelli. Harvey had organized major retrospectives and programs on such film figures as Vincente Minnelli, Vittorio de Sica and Joseph Mankiewicz. His book, "Directed by Vincente Minnelli," published in 1990 by HarperCollins, is widely considered the definitive study of Mr. Minnelli and the MGM studio system of his time.

Thomas Keith (born January 1): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3990562.html

Thomas Keith has edited the poetry of Tom Crawford, Miriam Sagan, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Dylan Thomas, and over a dozen titles by Tennessee Williams. Love Christopher Street won a 2012 Rainbow Award as Best LGBT Non Fiction, 1st place. Representing some of the most talented writers at work today, the 26 original essays in Love, Christopher Street encompass revealing, intense, profound, funny, personal, and queer reflections that span forty years of GLBT life in New York City.

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3990896.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Statistics: December 2013

Here are the 2 months statistics for the visits on my website and 2 journals:

Site November 2013 December 2013
elisarolle.com 263.011 275.398
reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org 14.157 13.792
elisa-rolle.livejournal.com 32.017 32.387
Total 309.185 321.577

there was an increase of the 4% on the visits.



Reminder: starting from January 2014, there is the possibility to place an advertising banner on my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/. The two top banners are already booked for all 2014, but there is still availability for the rotating side menu banners.


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3991182.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Best Gay Contemporary General Fiction: Damaged Angels by Larry Benjamin

Like life these stories reflected all possible endings, good and bad, happily ever after and not, forever love and tragic losses. It wasn’t an easy read for me, cause the author managed to sketch these mostly young men in a way that you arrived to care for them, and wanted for all of them to be happy, but unfortunately, that is not realistic. Truth, even in the tragedy, some of them at least found the comfort of knowing they are, or were, loved. It can be a small consolation, but for some of them it was the most important thing.

On the contrary of other literary anthologies, cause Damaged Angels is for me one of the best example of Gay literature, the style wasn’t heavy and the stories flows smoothly, if deeply involving. There is no judgment in the author, like there is no solution, he is not teaching a lessons to young men, but maybe he is giving them voice when most often their voices are too low to be heard. Recurring themes are AIDS, drugs, mental illness, hustling, sometime alone, sometime mixed in the same story; they are tragic topics, with an almost impossible way out of it, and indeed, not many will find that light at the end of the tunnel.

But even if it sounds strange, I feel like the author believes in forever love, and that, if someone is lucky enough to find it, there is a small chance of happiness, and maybe that light at the end of the tunnel can be switched on for them.

Paperback: 216 pages
Publisher: Beaten Track Publishing (April 8, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1909192198
ISBN-13: 978-1909192195
Amazon: Damaged Angels
Amazon Kindle: Damaged Angels



More Reviews by Author at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Reviews


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3991453.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.