January 5th, 2014

andrew potter

Margaret Chung (October 2, 1889 – January 5, 1959)

Margaret Jessie Chung (October 2, 1889, Santa Barbara, California – January 5, 1959) was the first known American-born Chinese female physician. After graduating from the University of Southern California in 1916 and completing her internship and residency in Illinois, she established one of the first Western medical clinics in San Francisco's Chinatown in the early 1920s.

She achieved recognition during the 1930s and 1940s for her patriotic activities on behalf of China and the United States. As part of her efforts to support the allied forces, she "adopted" over one thousand "sons," most of whom were white American military men. Known as "Mom Chung," she entertained, corresponded with, and inspired her sons to fight against the Japanese invasion of China.

Newspaper articles consistently noted two seemingly contradictory aspects of her character: First, Chung, then in her forties and fifties, was a successful doctor who never married or bore children. Second, she was a devoted mother to her adopted sons, who called themselves "Fair-Haired Bastards," because of their racial background and her status as an unmarried woman.

A pioneer in both professional and political realms, Chung led an unconventional personal life. As a female medical student in an otherwise all-male school, she adopted masculine dress and called herself "Mike," but after having established a professional practice she reverted to conventional dress and her female name. She had close and apparently intense relationships with at least two other women, the writer Elsa Gidlow and entertainer Sophie Tucker, that some writers have speculated were romantic. Although she was briefly engaged, she never did marry. An advocate of strong Sino-American relations, Chung was a friend, and confidante, of travel writer Richard Halliburton (1900-1939), who attempted (and died in the attempt) to sail a junk the Sea Dragon, as a symbol of the bond of East and West, from Hong Kong to the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Chung

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More LGBT History at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

It Happened Today: January 5

Kay Lahusen & Barbara Gittings: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/1404003.html

Barbara Gittings met her partner, Kay Tobin Lahusen in 1961 at a picnic in Rhode Island, and described how they began: "We hit it off, we started courting. I flew to Boston and got off the plane with a big bunch of flowers in my hand. I couldnt resist. I did not care what the world thought. I dropped the flowers, grabbed her and kissed her. That was not being done in 1961." Lahusen moved to Philadelphia to be with Gittings. Gittings and Lahusen were together for 46 years, until Gittings's death.

Margaret Chung (October 2, 1889 – January 5, 1959): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3420370.html

Margaret Jessie Chung was the first known American-born Chinese female physician. After graduating from the University of Southern California in 1916 and completing her internship and residency in Illinois, she established one of the first Western medical clinics in San Francisco's Chinatown in the early 1920s. She had close and apparently intense relationships with at least two other women, the writer Elsa Gidlow and entertainer Sophie Tucker, that some writers have speculated were romantic.

Stan Hurwitz & F.X. McCloskey: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3420605.html

Stan Hurwitz was a press agent who became a theater manager, coproducing Nunsense and Pump Boys and Dinettes. A theater impresario and producer, Mr. Hurwitz's love for the theater began when he was 9 and received hand puppets as a Hanukkah gift, according to his companion of 25 years, F.X. McCloskey. With Deen Kogan (they met in the early 1960s) of the Society Hill Playhouse, he produced Nunsense, the longest-running musical comedy in Philadelphia. He died on Jan 5 1991 at his home in Gladwyne.

Tim Melester & Craig Lucas: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3420922.html

Craig Lucas is is the author of many plays and films including "Blue Window," "Reckless," "Prelude to a Kiss," "God's Heart," "The Dying Gaul," and "Longtime Companion." Postcard from Grief (1995) was written by Craig Lucas to remember his companion, Tim Melester: "My lover died this year on January 5th. We were together for eleven years. He was forty. His name was Timothy Scott Melester. He was a surgeon and an AIDS educator. Tim was my anchor: his battle to live was my battle."

Trebor Healey: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3993694.html

Trebor Healey is an American poet and novelist. He received both the Ferro-Grumley Fiction Award and the Violet Quill Award for his first novel, Through It Came Bright Colors: The story of Neill Cullane, a closeted, conflicted 21 year-old that lives in two worlds that seem light-years apart, but that he travels between in a beaten-up VW car. Healey spent his twenties in San Francisco, where he was active in the spoken word scene of the late 80s and early 90s, publishing 5 chapbooks of poetry.

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