January 22nd, 2014

andrew potter

A. J. Antoon (December 7, 1944 – January 22, 1992)

A. J. Antoon (December 7, 1944 – January 22, 1992) was an American theatre director. He attended the Yale School of Drama. Beginning in 1971, Antoon directed numerous plays at the New York Shakespeare Festival over a period of nearly 20 years. In 1973, Antoon became one of the few directors to have been nominated for two Tony Awards in the same category in the same year. In addition to winning the Tony Award with one of his nominations, Antoon was also the winner of a Drama Desk Award, a New York Drama Critics' Circle Award, and an Obie Award. His career lasted until 1991; he died less than a year later from AIDS-related lymphoma.

Alfred Joseph Antoon was born in Methuen, Massachusetts, on December 7, 1944. His parents were Alfred J. Antoon, Sr. and Josephine Antoon (née Saba). Antoon attended Lawrence Central Catholic High School in nearby Lawrence, Massachusetts. After high school he studied for priesthood at the Shadowbrook Jesuit seminary in Lenox, Massachusetts while also attending Boston College. He later dropped out from the seminary and earned his Bachelor's Degree from Boston College in 1968. He went on to attend the Yale School of Drama for a year and a half before leaving to begin his work in professional theatre. Antoon died at the age of 47 from AIDS-related lymphoma on January 22, 1992, at the NYU Medical Center. After his death, a collection of Antoon's papers and correspondence was donated to Billy Rose Theatre Collection.

Antoon directed his first professional production, Story Theatre, at St. Clement's Church Theatre in 1971. In that same year, Antoon presented Subject to Fits, a play written by his Yale friend Robert Montgomery, to Joseph Papp, founder of the New York Shakespeare Festival. Papp gave Antoon the directing job, and the play opened on February 14, 1971 at the Public Theatre. This was the first of many productions he would direct for the New York Shakespeare Festival over a career lasting 20 years. Subject to Fits was successful, and it moved to London where it was staged by the Royal Shakespeare Company at The Place. Antoon continued his success with the New York Shakespeare Festival in 1971 with his direction of Tale of Cymbeline.


AIDS Quilt

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._J._Antoon

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Heath Ledger (April 4, 1979 – January 22, 2008)

Heath Andrew Ledger (4 April 1979 – 22 January 2008) was an Australian actor and director. After performing roles in Australian television and film during the 1990s, Ledger left for the United States in 1998 to develop his film career. His work comprised nineteen films, including 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), The Patriot (2000), A Knight's Tale (2001), Monster's Ball (2001), Ned Kelly (2003), The Brothers Grimm (2005), Lords of Dogtown (2005), Brokeback Mountain (2005), Casanova (2005), Candy (2006), I'm Not There (2007), The Dark Knight (2008), and The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009). He also produced and directed music videos, and aspired to be a film director.

For his portrayal of Ennis Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain, Ledger won the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor and Best International Actor from the Australian Film Institute, and was nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role and for the Academy Award for Best Actor. Posthumously he shared the 2007 Independent Spirit Robert Altman Award with the rest of the ensemble cast, the director, and the casting director for the film I'm Not There, which was inspired by the life and songs of American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. In the film, Ledger portrayed a fictional actor named Robbie Clark, one of six characters embodying aspects of Dylan's life and persona.

Ledger died on 22 January 2008 from an accidental intoxication from prescription drugs. A few months before his death, Ledger had finished filming his performance as the Joker in The Dark Knight. His death occurred during editing of The Dark Knight and in the midst of filming his last role as Tony in The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus. His untimely death cast a sombre shadow over the subsequent promotion of the $180 million Batman production. Ledger received numerous posthumous accolades for his critically acclaimed performance in the film, including the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, a Best Actor International Award at the 2008 Australian Film Institute Awards, for which he became the first actor to win an award posthumously, the 2008 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor, the 2009 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture, and the 2009 BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heath_Ledger

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Alan L. Hale (1950 - January 22, 1991)

Alan L. Hale, a publicity agent for performing arts organizations and artists, died on January 22, 1991, at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan. He was 41 years old and lived in Palisades, N.Y.

He died of AIDS, said Al Husted, his partner in Hale & Husted Public Relations.

His clients included the Pepsico Summerfare International Festival of the Performing Arts, the Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, the Elisa Monte Dance Company, the American Festival Theater and the violinist Robert McDuffie.

Mr. Hale was born in Fort Worth and graduated from Pace University. He studied music composition with John Corigliano and Hannah Hall.

Source: www.nytimes.com/1991/01/25/obituaries/alan-l-hale-publicity-agent-41.html

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Bernard Johnson (December 12, 1936 - January 22, 1997)

Bernard Johnson (born December 12, 1936 in Detroit, Michigan), a dancer, choreographer and fashion and costume designer, died on Jan. 22 at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan. He was 60 and lived in Manhattan. He was survived by his companion, George Bergeron. Bergeron was assistant to Johnson for ''New Jack City" (1991).

The cause was complications from pneumonia, his family said.

Mr. Johnson was something of a Renaissance man in dance. He trained in ballet in Detroit, where he was born and where he began his professional career. While still a teen-ager, Mr. Johnson performed in New York City with Ward Flemyng's New York Negro Ballet and designed costumes for the company. He also appeared with Aubrey Hitchins's Negro Dance Theater in 1956.

Mr. Johnson danced in musicals on and Off Broadway, including the Broadway production of ''On a Clear Day You Can See Forever'' and City Center productions of ''Fiorello'' and ''Showboat.'' He performed in modern and jazz dance groups, among them Dancellington, which he directed with Mercedes Ellington and for which he designed costumes.

He also performed with Cleo Quitman, his former wife, in a cabaret act that toured Europe and was featured at the Apollo and in the Catskills during the 1960's. He danced in the 1980 Off Broadway revue ''Stompin' at the Savoy,'' and directed the Off Broadway musical ''Back in the Big Time'' in 1986.

Mr. Johnson choreographed the Broadway and national tour productions of ''Ain't Supposed to Die a Natural Death'' in the early 1970's, the 1975 film ''The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings,'' and acts for Melba Moore, the Manhattans and shows at the Apollo, Madison Square Garden, the Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas and Cafe Versailles in New York. His choreographic credits also included commercials and two command performances for King Hassan II in Morocco in the early 1990's.



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Source: www.nytimes.com/1997/02/01/arts/bernard-johnson-60-dancer-choreographer-and-designer.html

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Carl Wittman (February 23, 1943 - January 22, 1986)

Carl Wittman (February 23, 1943– January 22, 1986) was a member of the national council of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and later an activist for LGBT rights. He co-authored "An Interracial Movement of the Poor?" (1963) with Tom Hayden and wrote "A Gay Manifesto" (1970). He died of an AIDS-related cause.

In 1960, Wittman entered Swarthmore College where he became a student activist. Wittman spent summers doing civil rights work in the South, and joined the national council of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). In 1966, after becoming disillusioned with homophobia in the New Left, Wittman left SDS. Wittman married Mimi Feingold the same year.

In 1967, Wittman moved to San Francisco with Feingold where they lived with other activists in an anti-draft commune. Wittman turned in his draft card to the Oakland Induction Center in October 1967 during Stop the Draft Week.

Wittman, while actively gay since the age of 14, remained closeted until coming out in the late 60s in an article, "Waves of Resistance," published in the November, 1968 issue of the antiwar magazine, Liberation.

In 1969, Wittman wrote Refugees from Amerika: A Gay Manifesto published by The Red Butterfly cell of the Gay Liberation Front January, 1970.

In 1971, Wittman moved to Wolf Creek, OR with his then-lover, Stevens McClave. Two years later, he began a long-term relationship with a fellow war resister, Allan Troxler, a conscientious objector. He also helped organize the state's first Gay pride march and co-founded the Durham Lesbian and Gay Health Project, which followed the grassroots model of the 1970s feminist health movement.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Wittman
In the '60s homosexual liberation became predominantly a political question. In early 1969, Carl Wittman, the son of Communist Party members and a drafter of the Port Huron Statement, wrote "A Gay Manifesto" while living in the midst of the political and gay scenes in San Francisco. It became the defining document for a new movement. The conclusion lists "An Outline of Imperatives for Gay Liberation":

1. Free ourselves: come out everywhere; initiate self defense and political activity; initiate counter community institutions.
2. Turn other gay people on: talk all the time; understand, forgive, accept.
3. Free the homosexual in everyone: we'll be getting a good bit of shit from threatened latents: be gentle, and keep talking & acting free.
4. We've been playing an act for a long time, so we're consummate actors. Now we can begin to be, and it'll be a good show!

Wittman's combination of community building, constructive dialogue, goodwill, trust, and fun was a mixture of New Left organizing, homosexual playfulness, and the single most important directive of gay liberation: to come out. (The term "coming out" had not been in common use before; previously the metaphor had been about coming into the homosexual world.) For gay liberationists, coming out was not simply a matter of self-identification. It was a radical, public act that would impact every aspect of a person's life. The publicness of coming out was a decisive break from the past. Whereas homophile groups argued that homosexuals could find safety by promoting privacy, gay liberation argued that safety and liberation were found only by living in, challenging, and changing the public sphere. --A Queer History of the United States by Michael Bronski
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Christopher Palmer (September 9, 1946 - January 22, 1995)

Christopher Palmer (9 September 1946 – 22 January 1995) was an English composer, arranger and orchestrator; biographer of composers, champion of lesser-known composers and writer on film music and other musical subjects; record producer; and lecturer. He was involved in a very wide range of projects and his output was prodigious. He came to be regarded as one of the finest symphonic orchestrators of his generation. He was dedicated to the conservation, recording and promotion of classic film scores by composers such as Bernard Herrmann, Dimitri Tiomkin, Franz Waxman, Miklós Rózsa, Elmer Bernstein and others. He wrote full biographies as well as sleeve notes, radio scripts, reviews and articles, on composers such as Benjamin Britten, Frederick Delius, Karol Szymanowski, Arthur Bliss, George Dyson, Herbert Howells, Maurice Ravel, Nikolai Tcherepnin and others.

He arranged music from the film scores and other music of William Walton, Malcolm Arnold, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Ernest Bloch. Artists who have performed his work include José Carreras, James Galway, Julian Lloyd Webber, and Jill Gomez. Outside the area of music, he put together anthologies of the prose of Arthur Machen and James Farrar. He died of an AIDS-related disease at the age of 48.

Christopher Francis Palmer was born in Norfolk in 1946. He early showed interest in music, encouraged by his father, a RAF pilot, who had trained as a church organist. He also studied the organ at Saxlingham, then went on to the University of Cambridge, where he qualified in modern languages and music. His teachers at Cambridge included Peter le Huray and Sir David Willcocks.

His first involvement in film music was as a writer, and through this he met many film composers in the United Kingdom and the United States. He struck up a friendship with Bernard Herrmann, who was living in London at the time. He assisted Herrmann with his scoring for Taxi Driver and Obsession (both released in 1976; Herrmann died in December 1975, just after completing the score to Taxi Driver). Through Herrmann, Palmer had met Charles Gerhardt, with whom he collaborated on at least 15 albums. Miklós Rózsa was impressed by Palmer's critiques of his work, and invited him to orchestrate part of his score for the film Last Embrace (1979). He then met Elmer Bernstein, who used Palmer's assistance in scoring Heavy Metal (1981). This led to further orchestration work with film composers such as Maurice Jarre (A Passage to India (1984), Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (1985)), Stanley Myers (The Witches (1990)), and many others.


Elmer Bernstein and Christopher Palmer, London, 1995

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Palmer

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Craig Claiborne (September 4, 1920 – January 22, 2000)

Craig Claiborne (September 4, 1920 – January 22, 2000) was an American restaurant critic, food journalist and book author. A long-time food editor and restaurant critic for The New York Times, he was also the author of numerous cookbooks and an autobiography. Over the course of his career, he made many contributions to gastronomy and food writing in the United States.

Born in Sunflower, Mississippi, and raised on the region's cuisine in the kitchen of his mother's boarding house.

Claiborne served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. After deciding that his true passion lay in cooking, he used his G.I. Bill benefits to attend the École hôtelière de Lausanne (Lausanne Hotel School), located in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Returning to the U.S. from Europe, he worked his way up in the food-publishing business in New York City, New York, as a contributor to Gourmet magazine, a food-products publicist and finally becoming the food editor of The New York Times in 1957. Claiborne was the first man to supervise the food page at a major American newspaper and is credited with broadening The New York Times's coverage of new restaurants and innovative chefs. A typical food section of a newspaper in the 1950s was largely targeted to a female readership and limited to columns on entertaining and cooking for the upscale homemaker. Claiborne brought his knowledge of cuisine and own passion for food to the pages, transforming it into an important cultural and social bellwether for New York City and the nation at large.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Claiborne

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George Mosse (September 20, 1918 - January 22, 1999)

George Lachmann Mosse (September 20, 1918, Berlin, Germany – January 22, 1999, Madison, Wisconsin, United States) was a German-born American social and cultural historian. Mosse authored 25 books on a variety of fields, from English constitutional law, Lutheran theology, to the history of fascism, Jewish history, and the history of masculinity. He was perhaps best-known for his books and articles that redefined the discussion and interpretation of Nazism. In 1966, he and Walter Laqueur founded The Journal of Contemporary History, which they co-edited up to 1999.

Mosse was born in Berlin into one of Germany's richest Jewish families. His maternal grandfather, Rudolf Mosse, was the founder of one of Germany's leading newspaper concerns and publisher of Berliner Tageblatt. His father, Hans Lachmann Mosse, commissioned the architect Erich Mendelsohn to redesign the Mossehaus where the Tageblatt was produced until the Nazis closed it and forced the family to emigrate. He was educated at the famous Mommsen-Gymnasium in Berlin and later from 1928 onwards at Schule Schloss Salem. In 1933 the Mosse family fled and separated. His mother went to Switzerland, as did his sister. His father and his new wife moved to France. Mosse went to boarding school in England. Mosse served as professor at the University of Iowa (1944–1955), the University of Wisconsin from 1955 onwards, and also the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A strong Zionist, Mosse enjoyed teaching in Israel. As a pupil in Germany, Mosse attended the exclusive boys' boarding school at Salem. During the period when Mosse attend the school, it was run by former Army officers who imposed a demanding physical education regime imposed on the pupils, which Mosse as a frail youth, he had difficulty with. Most of Mosse's teachers were supporters of the German National People's Party and were more or less open anti-Semites. Mosse's experience there left him with an life-long sense of being an outsider.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Mosse

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Marc Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 – January 22, 1964)

Marcus Samuel Blitzstein, better known as Marc Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 – January 22, 1964), was an American composer. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical The Cradle Will Rock, directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. He is known for The Cradle Will Rock and for his Off-Broadway translation/adaptation of The Threepenny Opera by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. His works also include the opera Regina, an adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play The Little Foxes; the Broadway musical Juno, based on Seán O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock; and No for an Answer. He completed translation/adaptations of Brecht's and Weill's musical play Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and of Brecht's play Mother Courage and Her Children with music by Paul Dessau. Blitzstein also composed music for films, such as Surf and Seaweed (1931) and The Spanish Earth (1937), and he contributed two songs to the original 1960 production of Hellman's play Toys in the Attic.

Marc Blitzstein was born in Philadelphia on March 2, 1905, the son of affluent parents. In 1928 his father Sam Blitzstein married Robert Serber's sister-in-law Madeline Leof. Blitzstein's musical gifts were apparent at an early age; he had performed a Mozart piano concerto by the time he was seven. He went on to study piano with Alexander Siloti, (a pupil of Tchaikovsky and Liszt), and made his professional concerto debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in Liszt's E-flat Piano Concerto when he was 21. His first relationship was in 1924, when he traveled to Europe with conductor Alexander Smallens.

After studying composition at the Curtis Institute of Music, he went to Europe to continue his studies in Berlin with Arnold Schoenberg (with whom he did not get on), and in Paris with Nadia Boulanger (with whom he did). Despite his later political beliefs, he was, in the early years of his career, a self-proclaimed and unrepentant artistic snob, who firmly believed that true art was only for the intellectual elite. He was vociferous in denouncing composers — in particular Respighi, Ravel, and Kurt Weill — who, he felt, debased their standards to reach a wider public.


Marc Blitzstein and Leonard Bernstein

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Blitzstein

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Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher (30 June 1852 – 22 January 1930)

Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher GCVO, KCB, PC, DL (30 June 1852 – 22 January 1930) was a historian and Liberal politician in the United Kingdom, although his period of greatest influence over military and foreign affairs was as a courtier, member of public committees and behind-the-scenes "fixer". (Picture: Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher, by Walter Stoneman, bromide print, 1923, Photographs Collection, NPG x162215)

Much of Esher's career was spent organizing the English military and official parties, but he also found time to write biographies of Queen Victoria and Lord Kitchener. He also wrote poetry, including "Ionicus", which was dedicated to William Johnson Cory, his close friend and likely lover at Eton.

Although happily married, Esher had a longtime male companion; according to historian A.L. Rowse, Esher's diaries document the intimate and physical nature of their relationship. Morris B. Kaplan, in his book "Sodom on the Thames", puts Esher at the center of gay life in London and at Eton.

Brett was the son of William Baliol Brett, 1st Viscount Esher and Eugénie Mayer (1814–1904). Esher was part French and remembered sitting on the lap of an old man who had played violin for Marie Antoinette. Born in London, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. He held a militia commission after Cambridge.

Having been a Conservative supporter as a young man, Brett began his political career in 1880, as Liberal Member of Parliament for Penryn and Falmouth. He was Parliamentary Private Secretary to Lord Hartington (Secretary of State for War 1882-5) and once drove him to a Cabinet meeting on a sleigh through the snow. However he elected to withdraw from public politics in 1885, after losing an election at Plymouth, in favour of a behind the scenes role. In 1895, he became Permanent Secretary to the Office of Works, where the future Edward VII was impressed by his dedication to the elderly Queen Victoria. Upon his father's death on 24 May 1899, he succeeded him as Viscount Esher.


Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher, by Cyril Flower, 1st Baron Battersea, platinum print, 1890s, 5 5/8in. x 7 5/8in. (142 mm x 195 mm), Purchased, 1982, Photographs Collection, NPG Ax15680

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Brett,_2nd_Viscount_Esher

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Kelly Huegel

Kelly Huegel is the director of public-private partnerships for a military medical foundation. Previously, she worked for the Metropolitan Washington DC chapter of PFLAG, where she helped provide support and educational services for GLBTQ people and their families. The author of two books and more than fifty published articles, Kelly has a special passion for working with teens and holds a degree in secondary education. She welcomes readers to follow her updates on GLBTQ politics and people or message her direct via Twitter @GLBTQguide. Kelly lives with her girlfriend in suburban Washington, D.C.

Further Readings:

GLBTQ: The Survival Guide for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Teens by Kelly Huegel
Paperback: 240 pages
Publisher: Free Spirit Publishing; Second Edition, Revised, Revised and Updated 2nd Edition edition (March 1, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1575423634
ISBN-13: 978-1575423630
Amazon: GLBTQ: The Survival Guide for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Teens
Amazon Kindle: GLBTQ: The Survival Guide for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Teens

When it was first published in 2003, GLBTQ quickly became the indispensable resource for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning teens. This fully revised and updated edition retains all of the straightforward information and practical advice of the original edition while providing a contemporary look at society and its growing acceptance of people who are GLBTQ. Included are updates on efforts to promote equality, including the current status of legislative initiatives concerning safe schools, gay marriage, workplace equality, transgender expression, and Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. Issues-based information and advice address coming out, prejudice, getting support, staying safe, making healthy choices, and thriving in school. This frank, sensitive book is written for young people who are beginning to question their sexual or gender identity, those who are ready to work for GLBTQ rights, and those who may need advice, guidance, or reassurance that they are not alone.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels


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It Happened Today: January 22

A. J. Antoon (December 7, 1944 – January 22, 1992): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3428933.html

A. J. Antoon was an American theatre director. He attended the Yale School of Drama. In 1973, Antoon became one of the few directors to have been nominated for two Tony Awards in the same category in the same year. In addition to winning the Tony Award with one of his nominations, Antoon was also the winner of a Drama Desk Award, a New York Drama Critics' Circle Award, and an Obie Award. His career lasted until 1991; he died less than a year later from AIDS-related lymphoma.

Alan L. Hale (1950 - January 22, 1991): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4147953.html

Alan L. Hale, a publicity agent for organizations and artists, died on January 22, 1991, at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan. His clients included the Pepsico Summerfare International Festival of the Performing Arts, the Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, the Elisa Monte Dance Company, the American Festival Theater and the violinist Robert McDuffie. Mr. Hale was born in Fort Worth and graduated from Pace University. He studied music composition with John Corigliano and Hannah Hall.

Bernard Johnson (December 12, 1936 - January 22, 1997): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4148153.html

Bernard Johnson (born December 12, 1936 in Detroit, Michigan), a dancer, choreographer and fashion and costume designer, died on Jan. 22 at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan. He was 60 and lived in Manhattan. He was survived by his companion, George Bergeron. Bergeron was assistant to Johnson for ''New Jack City" (1991). He was something of a Renaissance man in dance. At the time of his death, he was a professor of dance and costume design at the University of California at Irvine.

Brandon Judell (born January 22): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3057760.html

Brandon Judell (born January 22) is currently teaching "Queer Theater" and "Intro to Mass Communications" at The City College of New York and is Coordinator of The Simon H. Rifkind Center. His area of specialty is history of Jewish cinema. He has been a journalist for over 30 years and has been published in The Forward, The Village Voice, The New York Daily News, indieWire.com, and has written about AIDS in Israel for the Journal of the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care.

Carl Wittman (February 23, 1943 - January 22, 1986): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3058072.html

Carl Wittman (February 23, 1943– January 22, 1986) was a member of the national council of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and later an activist for LGBT rights. He co-authored "An Interracial Movement of the Poor?" (1963) with Tom Hayden. In 1969, Wittman wrote Refugees from Amerika: A Gay Manifesto published by The Red Butterfly cell of the Gay Liberation Front January, 1970. When he himself became ill with AIDS in the mid-80s, Wittman declined hospital treatment; he committed suicide.

Christopher Palmer (September 9, 1946 - January 22, 1995): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3429177.html

Christopher Palmer (9 September 1946 – 22 January 1995) was a composer, arranger and orchestrator; biographer of composers, champion of lesser-known composers and writer on film music and other musical subjects; record producer; and lecturer. He was involved in a very wide range of projects and his output was prodigious. He came to be regarded as one of the finest symphonic orchestrators of his generation. He was dedicated to the conservation, recording and promotion of classic film scores.

Claire Waldoff & Olga von Roeder: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4148309.html

Claire Waldoff was a German singer. She was a famous cabaret singer and entertainer. Waldoff lived together with Olga von Roeder. They lived happily in Berlin during the 1920s. Together they met often other lesbian friends in the club, Damenklub Pyramide. After the German Nazis won the elections 1933 and Hitler came to power, Waldoff's success ended. In 1939, she and Olga von Roder left Berlin together, and they lived in Bayerisch Gmain. Claire and Olga are buried together, on the same lot.

Craig Claiborne (September 4, 1920 – January 22, 2000): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3428119.html

Craig Claiborne (September 4, 1920 – January 22, 2000) was an American restaurant critic, food journalist and book author. A long-time food editor and restaurant critic for The New York Times, he was also the author of numerous cookbooks and an autobiography. Over the course of his career, he made many contributions to gastronomy and food writing in the United States. In his will, he bequeathed his estate to the Culinary Institute of America, located in Hyde Park, New York.

George Mosse (September 20, 1918 - January 22, 1999): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3058265.html

George Lachmann Mosse was a German-born American social and cultural historian. Mosse authored 25 books on a variety of fields, from English constitutional law, Lutheran theology, to the history of fascism, Jewish history, and the history of masculinity. He was perhaps best-known for his books and articles that redefined the discussion and interpretation of Nazism. In 1966, he and Walter Laqueur founded The Journal of Contemporary History, which they co-edited up to 1999.

Heath Ledger (April 4, 1979 – January 22, 2008): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4147512.html

Heath Ledger was an Australian actor and director. After performing roles in Australian television and film during the 1990s, Ledger left for the United States in 1998 to develop his film career. For his portrayal of Ennis Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain, Ledger won the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor and Best International Actor from the Australian Film Institute, and was nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role and for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Kelly Huegel: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4148629.html

Kelly Huegel is the director of public-private partnerships for a military medical foundation. When it was first published in 2003, GLBTQ quickly became the indispensable resource for GLBTQ teens. This fully revised and updated edition retains all of the straightforward information and practical advice of the original edition while providing a contemporary look at society and its growing acceptance of people who are GLBTQ. Kelly lives with her girlfriend in suburban Washington, D.C.

Marc Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 – January 22, 1964): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3428447.html

Marc Blitzstein was an American composer. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical The Cradle Will Rock, directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. He is also known for his Off-Broadway translation/adaptation of The Threepenny Opera. His works also include the opera Regina, an adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play The Little Foxes; the Broadway musical Juno, based on Seán O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock; and No for an Answer.

Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher (30 June 1852 – 22 January 1930): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3428682.html

Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher, was a historian and Liberal politician in the UK, although his period of greatest influence was as a courtier, member of public committees and behind-the-scenes "fixer". Although married, Esher had homosexual inclinations, but his flirtations with young men were regarded with tolerant amusement in polite society. He was evidently sufficiently discreet to avoid becoming entangled in the Cleveland Street Scandal, unlike his friend Lord Arthur Somerset.

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andrew potter

Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation 2014 Call for Submissions

2014 Playwriting Competition

The Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation will accept submissions for its 2014 Playwriting Competition between March 1 and June 30, 2014. Electronic submissions must be received by midnight on June 30, and mailed manuscripts must be postmarked by the deadline.

All works submitted (full–length dramas, comedies, musicals, screenplays) must be original and in English. All works must concern LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender) life and must be based on, or directly inspired by, a historical person, culture, work of art or event.

There is no entry fee. Prizes are as follows: First Prize, $3,000; Second Prize, $1,500; Honorable Mentions, $500. Prizewinners will be announced before the end of the year.

For complete submission guidelines, visit the foundation’s website: aabbfoundation.org, or write to Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation, P.O. Box 26124, Brooklyn, NY 11202.

Production Grants

The foundation also offers grants to production companies to offset expenses in producing theatrical works (plays, musicals, operas, choral works, orchestral works with text) and film or video. All works must be based on, or inspired by, history and must concern LGBT life.

Proposals may be submitted throughout the year. For complete details and proposal submission guidelines, visit the foundation’s website: aabbfoundation.org, or write to Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation, P.O. Box 26124, Brooklyn, NY 11202.

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4149222.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.