January 23rd, 2014

andrew potter

Dudley Stevens (August 8, 1935 - January 23, 1993)

Dudley Stevens (born Ilford 8 August 1935, died Hove 23 January 1993) was one of the most popular members of the Players Theatre Company, based in London in the early Seventies - no mean feat when the roll-call included Fred Stone, Maurice Browning, Robin Hunter, Sheila Matthews and Archie Harridine. (P: http://www.playerstheatrearchive.org.uk/Artistes/album/S/Dudley%20Stevens/index.html#DS-01.jpg)

In that last surviving haven of Victorian music hall Stevens fancied himself as a Lion Comique - one of those stylish chaps in full evening dress who would deliver a patter song at full tilt without dropping a syllable, and Stevens never did. He was less successful when he attempted more low-brow coster songs, but his raised eyebrow at the curtain call let you into the secret: he was only joking. He never allowed himself to become too closely tied to the Players although he readily admitted, as did so many others, that he was grateful for the many times it paid the rent.

Born in Ilford in 1935, Stevens was the first of his family to make a life in the theatre, after a miserable few years in commerce. His stage debut was in New York in 1961 in Ten Nights in a Bar Room and he first appeared in London the following year in Noel Coward's Sail Away.

Other West End appearances included How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1963), Thark (1965), Trelawny (1972), Gypsy, Something's Afoot (1978; a witty Agatha Christie musical spoof) and Berny Stringle and Cliff Adams' musical Liza of Lambeth (1976) which, despite the universally bad reviews, ran for four months at the Shaftesbury. One of the delights from the show was Stevens's duet with Christopher Neil, 'Good Bad Time', in which Stevens's hitherto unnoted talents as a whistler added a plangent note to Cliff Adams' bitter-sweet tune.



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Source: www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituary-dudley-stevens-1470736.html (Obituary: Dudley Stevens, BARRY BROWN, Thursday 04 February 1993, The Independent)

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Gary Burton & Jonathan Chong

Gary Burton (born January 23, 1943, Anderson, Indiana) is an American jazz vibraphonist. After the end of his second marriage in the 1980s, Burton realized he was gay. He came out in 1989, a revelation he has said he felt would have ruined his career at an earlier time. By the 1980s, Burton was in a homosexual relationship. He came out publicly in a 1994 radio interview with Terry Gross, making him one of rather few openly gay jazz musicians of prominence. In 2013, he married his partner of nine years, Jonathan Chong.

A true original on the vibraphone, Burton developed a pianistic style of four-mallet technique as an alternative to the prevailing two-mallet technique. This approach caused Burton to be heralded as an innovator and his sound and technique are widely imitated. He is also known for pioneering fusion jazz and popularizing the duet format in jazz, as well as being a major figure in jazz education due to his 30 years at the Berklee College of Music.

Beginning music at six years old, Burton for the most part taught himself to play marimba and vibraphone. He also began studying piano at age sixteen as he finished high school in Princeton, Indiana (56–60). Burton has cited jazz pianist Bill Evans as a main inspiration for his approach toward the vibraphone.

Burton attended Berklee College of Music in Boston in 1960–61. He studied with Herb Pomeroy and soon befriended the composer and arranger Michael Gibbs. After establishing his career during the 1960s, he returned to join the staff of Berklee from 1971–2004, serving first as Professor, then Dean and finally as Executive Vice President during his last decade at the college.


Gary Burton is an American jazz vibraphonist. After the end of his second marriage in the 1980s, Burton realized he was gay. He came out in 1989, a revelation he has said he felt would have ruined his career at an earlier time. By the 1980s, Burton was in a homosexual relationship. He came out publicly in a 1994 radio interview with Terry Gross, making him one of rather few openly gay jazz musicians of prominence. In 2013, he married his long time partner, Jonathan Chong.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Burton

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Persistent Voices


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andrew potter

Huck Snyder (1954 - January 23, 1993)

Huck Snyder, an artist and a designer of vivid stage settings for dancers and performance artists, died on January 23, 1993, at his parents' home in Lansdale, Pa. He was 39.

He died of AIDS, said Elizabeth Dunn, a friend and colleague.

Mr. Snyder, whose full name was Harry William Snyder 4th, created sets and stage furniture that were surrealistic yet extremely simple and almost childlike at times. Imaginative and free in their execution and unmistakably his work, his sets often seemed inseparable from the vision of the performers with whom he worked. The multi-level, boxlike set he designed for the performance artist John Kelly's 1991 work "Maybe It's Cold Outside" was crammed with the colorful and mysterious artifacts of five people's lives and was considered by some to be Mr. Snyder's best work.

Other important collaborations with Mr. Kelly included "Pass the Blutwurst, Bitte," an evocation of the painter Egon Schiele and his work; "Find My Way Home," a retelling of the story of Orpheus and Eurydice; "Love of a Poet," based on Schumann's "Dichterliebe," and "Akin," which depicted the relationships of father-and-son troubadours from the middle ages to the present.

Mr. Snyder also created sets for dances by Bill T. Jones and Bart Cook, and for theater pieces by Ishmael Houston-Jones. He conceived, directed and designed "Circus," a performance-art piece presented in 1987 at La Mama E.T.C.


AIDS Quilt

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Source: www.nytimes.com/1993/01/28/arts/huck-snyder-artist-dies-at-39-designed-stage-sets-for-dancers.html

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

John Cleland (September 24, 1709 – January 23, 1789)

John Cleland is remembered for the one book he claims to have regretted writing, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure or Fanny Hill (1748-1749), the first (and probably the funniest and most humane) pornographic novel in English.

Cleland's life is obscure. His father was a friend of Alexander Pope, his education was good, and he spent twelve years as a soldier and bureaucrat in India. On his return to England in 1741, he soon found himself in financial difficulty. He is said to have composed The Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure while in Fleet Prison for debt.

The Bishop of London attempted to suppress the Memoirs, probably because of the passages depicting sodomy, but charges were not pressed against Cleland, who published an expurgated version of the novel in 1750.

Although he seems to have been promised a government pension, perhaps for propaganda work, this probably never materialized and the rest of his life was a financial struggle. He wrote novels, books on medicine and philology, and journalism without ever achieving a major success. He appears in James Boswell's Journals and elsewhere as an outspoken eccentric on the outskirts of the literary circles of eighteenth-century London.

Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure is a novel in two parts told in the first person by Fanny Hill about her rise via prostitution from a poor orphan in the country to a rich, respectable, married woman. It is elegantly written and features an amazing series of ingenious euphemisms for sexual organs and acts. For example, the male member is a "nipple of love," semen is "my dear love's liquid emanation of himself," and the female genitalia are the "soft laboratory of love."

The novel is a sexual fantasy in which women are endlessly compliant in satisfying male desire, in which all unattractive elements of sexuality and prostitution are avoided, and in which bourgeois morality is carefully balanced with a libertine philosophy claiming pleasure as the ultimate goal. Fanny loses her virginity to the man whom (after many sexual adventures) she will marry.

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Citation Information
Author: Johnson, Terrence
Entry Title: Cleland, John
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2002
Date Last Updated September 27, 2002
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/cleland_j.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date January 23, 2013
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Karl-Maria Kertbeny (February 28, 1824 - January 23, 1882)

Karl-Maria Kertbeny or Károly Mária Kertbeny (born Karl-Maria Benkert) (Vienna, February 28, 1824 – Budapest, January 23, 1882) was an Austrian-born Hungarian journalist, memoirist, and human rights campaigner. He is best known for coining the words heterosexual and homosexual.

The Benkert family moved to Budapest when he was a child — he was equally at home in Austria, Germany and Hungary. Hungarian writer and literary historian Lajos Hatvany has described him in these terms: "This moody, fluttering, imperfect writer is one of the best and undeservedly forgotten Hungarian memoir writers." He translated Hungarian poets' and writers' works into German, e.g., those of Sándor Petőfi, János Arany and Mór Jókai. Among his acquaintances were Heinrich Heine, George Sand, Alfred de Musset, Hans Christian Andersen and the Brothers Grimm.

As a young man, while working as a bookseller's apprentice, Benkert had a close friend who was homosexual. This young man killed himself after being blackmailed by an extortionist. Benkert later recalled that it was this tragic episode which led him to take a close interest in the subject of homosexuality, following what he called his "instinctive drive to take issue with every injustice."

After a stint in the Hungarian army, Benkert made a living as a journalist and travel writer, and wrote at least twenty-five books on various subjects. In 1847, he legally changed his name from Benkert to Karl-Maria Kertbeny (or Károly Mária Kertbeny), a Hungarian name with aristocratic associations. He settled in Berlin in 1868, still unmarried at 44. He claimed in his writings to be "normally sexed," and there is no direct evidence to contradict this, despite the skepticism of subsequent writers.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl-Maria_Kertbeny

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Salvador Dalí (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989)

Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marqués de Dalí de Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), known as Salvador Dalí, was a prominent Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Spain. (Picture: Salvador Dalí photographed by Carl Van Vechten on November 29, 1939)

Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work. His painterly skills are often attributed to the influence of Renaissance masters. His best-known work, The Persistence of Memory, was completed in 1931. Dalí's expansive artistic repertoire included film, sculpture, and photography, in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of media.

Dalí attributed his "love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes" to a self-styled "Arab lineage", claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors.

Dalí was highly imaginative, and also enjoyed indulging in unusual and grandiose behavior. His eccentric manner and attention-grabbing public actions sometimes drew more attention than his artwork, to the dismay of those who held his work in high esteem, and to the irritation of his critics.

Salvador Dali was one of the most popular and innovative artists of the twentieth century. As the most famous surrealist, he explored the unknown with extraordinary vigor and captured visions of unearthly beauty. He was a flamboyant celebrity, even hobnobbing with Andy WARHOL at Studio 54 in New York during the 1970s.


Galarina, 1945 (Galarina is at once one of the best portraits that Salvador Dalí did of Gala and also a great homage to Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio, 1483-1520), one of the masters of the Italian Renaissance for whom he felt most devotion. The title and composition of Galarina are a direct allusion to Salvador Dalí's intention of emulating his admired master when the latter painted the portrait La Fornarina (c. 1518). That painting was not only a classic Venus, but also the unfinished portrait of Margherita Luti, daughter of a baker ("fornaio") from Trastevere, and lover and muse of Raphael.)

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvador_Dal%C3%AD

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More Artists at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art


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andrew potter

Robert Leleux

"For those of you who don't know, I'm a freelance writer and editor, and the author of two books. My latest, The Living End, a memoir about my beloved grandmother's journey through Alzheimer's, has been published by St. Martin's Press. Though it's a difficult and painful topic, I'm excited to share my family's story. For us, forgiving and forgetting were more than usually intertwined.

My first book, The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy, also published by St. Martin's Press, was a very different story. It gave me the chance to tour the country, meeting fabulous people from every corner of the US.

Now, when I'm not writing books, I'm also the features editor of Lonny Magazine, one of the greatest shelter magazines in the industry. And I also write the Tex in the City column for the Texas Observer, one of the best independent news sources in the Southwest. It's an honor to write for them, and it, too has offered me the chance to meet amazing people.

So, let's see, what else can I tell you about myself? I live on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, with my gorgeous husband Michael. I consider myself lucky to have such a happy life!

Further Readings:

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy by Robert Leleux
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First Edition edition (January 6, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0312361696
ISBN-13: 978-0312361693
Amazon: The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy
Amazon Kindle: The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy is The Houston Press's Best Houston Book of the Year for 2008.

In the Dear John letter Daddy left for Mother and me, on a Saturday afternoon in early June 1996, on the inlaid Florentine table in the front entry of our house, which we found that night upon returning from a day spent in the crème-colored light of Neiman’s, Daddy wrote that he was leaving us because Mother was crazy, and because she’d driven me crazy in a way that perfectly suited her own insanity.

In a memoir studded with delicious lines and unforgettable set pieces, Robert Leleux describes his East Texas boyhood and coming of age under the tutelage of his eccentric, bewigged, flamboyant, and knowing mother.

Left high and dry by Daddy and living on their in-laws’ horse ranch in a white-pillared house they can’t afford, Robert and Mother find themselves chronically low on cash. Soon they are forced into more modest quarters, and as a teenaged Robert watches with hilarity and horror, Mother begins a desperate regimen of makeovers, extreme plastic surgeries, and finally hairpiece epoxies---all calculated to secure a new, wealthy husband.

Mother’s strategy takes her, with Robert in tow, from the glamorous environs of the Neiman Marcus beauty salon to questionable surgery offices and finally to a storefront clinic on the wrong side of Houston. Meanwhile, Robert begins his own journey away from Mother and through the local theater’s world of miscast hopefuls and thwarted ambitions---and into a romance that surprises absolutely no one but himself.

Written with a warmth and a wicked sense of fun that lighten even the most awful circumstances, The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy is a sparkling debut.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels


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andrew potter

It Happened Today: January 23

Luisa, Marquise Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4150197.html

Luisa, Marquise Casati Stampa di Soncino was an eccentric Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th-century Europe. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art". Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray.

Anne Whitney & Abby Adeline Manning: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4149301.html

Anne Whitney was an American sculptor and poet. Whitney sculpted notable people but also the painter Abby Adeline Manning, with whom Whitney is said to have had a "Boston marriage." Manning's work has since fallen into obscurity, and she is remembered now primarily as Whitney's longtime companion. Manning and Whitney perhaps met around 1862 when Anne was studying with the renowned William Rimmer. By 1878 Adeline and Anne were living and working in their new studio at 92 Mt. Vernon in Boston.

B. Michael Hunter & Johnny Manzon-Santos: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3059089.html

B. Michael Hunter was an educator and cultural activist. "It's through the community that we met." said Johnny Manzon-Santos. "Though Bert may have a different recollection, I first met him at a meeting of the Lesbian & Gay People of Color Steering Committee. I noticed Bert, one of the handsomest men I'd ever seen, who was really quite and cautious - the opposite of me. He was a writer and refreshingly not a graduate of an Ivy League school, like my ex-lover." Hunter died of AIDS in 2001.

Chris Quinton (born January 23): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4150389.html

Chris Quinton currently lives in a small and ancient city in the south-west of the United Kingdom, sharing her usually chaotic home with an extended family, two large dogs, fancy mice, sundry goldfish and a young frilled dragon. Paradox won a 2012 Rainbow Award as Best Gay Sci-fi/Fantasy, 3rd place: Phil thrives on the danger and excitement of his job, and he trusts his partner with his life. Until Ryan kisses him. It's a diversionary tactic, but the kiss shakes Phil to his foundations.

Dudley Stevens (August 8, 1935 - January 23, 1993): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4149593.html

Dudley Stevens (8 August 1935 - 23 January 1993) was one of the most popular members of the Players Theatre Company, in London in the early 70s, when the roll-call included Fred Stone, Maurice Browning, Robin Hunter, Sheila Matthews and Archie Harridine. In that last surviving haven of Victorian music hall Stevens fancied himself as a Lion Comique - one of those stylish chaps in full evening dress who would deliver a patter song at full tilt without dropping a syllable, and Stevens never did.

Gary Burton & Jonathan Chong: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3431103.html

Gary Burton is an American jazz vibraphonist. After the end of his second marriage in the 1980s, Burton realized he was gay. He came out in 1989, a revelation he has said he felt would have ruined his career at an earlier time. By the 1980s, Burton was in a homosexual relationship. He came out publicly in a 1994 radio interview with Terry Gross, making him one of rather few openly gay jazz musicians of prominence. In 2013, he married his long time partner, Jonathan Chong.

Huck Snyder (1954 - January 23, 1993): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4149782.html

Huck Snyder, an artist and a designer of vivid stage settings for dancers and performance artists, died on January 23, 1993, at his parents' home in Lansdale, Pa. He was 39. Snyder created sets and stage furniture that were surrealistic yet extremely simple and almost childlike at times. The set he designed for the performance artist John Kelly's 1991 "Maybe It's Cold Outside" was crammed with the colorful and mysterious artifacts of 5 people's lives and was considered to be Snyder's best work.

John Cleland (September 24, 1709 – January 23, 1789): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3430869.html

John Cleland is remembered for the one book he claims to have regretted writing, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure or Fanny Hill (1748-1749), the first (and probably the funniest and most humane) pornographic novel in English. The Memoirs give us a glimpse into the manners and practices of eighteenth-century lesbians and gay men. How far Cleland knew these matters from first-hand experience is uncertain. In his later years, he was considered to be a sodomite, which may have been political slander.

Karl-Maria Kertbeny (February 28, 1824 - January 23, 1882): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3059337.html

Karl-Maria Kertbeny or Károly Mária Kertbeny (born Karl-Maria Benkert) (Vienna, February 28, 1824 – Budapest, January 23, 1882) was an Austrian-born Hungarian journalist, memoirist, and human rights campaigner. He is best known for coining the words heterosexual and homosexual. His gravesiteis located in Kerepesi Cemetery in Budapest. The gay community set a new tombstone on it, and since 2002 it has been a recurring event at Hungarian gay festivals to place a wreath at his grave.

Randolph Scott & Cary Grant: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3488947.html

Cary Grant was an English actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. They met in 1932 when they were cast together in Hot Saturday. They lived together for many many years in Los Angeles. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters. Scott died little more than 3 months after Grant.

Robert Leleux: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/818712.html

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy is The Houston Press's Best Houston Book of the Year for 2008. In a memoir studded with delicious lines and unforgettable set pieces, Robert Leleux describes his East Texas boyhood and coming of age under the tutelage of his eccentric, bewigged, flamboyant, and knowing mother. Left high and dry by Daddy and living on their in-laws’ horse ranch in a white-pillared house they can’t afford, Robert and Mother find themselves chronically low on cash.

Salvador Dalí (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3431281.html

Salvador Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marqués de Dalí de Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), known as Salvador Dalí, was a prominent Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Spain. Dalí attributed his "love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes" to a self-styled "Arab lineage", claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors. Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work.

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andrew potter

The Backup Boyfriend by River Jaymes

Going solo (no pun intended) has to be a trend cause it’s often and often that I read self-published books that are at the same level, if not upper, than other novels published by the more acclaimed Gay Romance publishers. Usually, you have to take in account some problem with the editing, some bad typos, but in this case, maybe I was so enthralled in the story, sincerely I didn’t notice any. And while the plot is, apparently, the usual gay for you theme, there is something more psychological, and in the end, bittersweet in the deployment of the story.

Dylan’s best friend, actually almost a brother, the one with whom he shared his teen years as runaway kid, was gay; and he is now dead, AIDS, as many other young men. Rick, the friend, used to turn tricks on the streets, and that is how Dylan met him; Dylan became friend, brother and protector for Rick, but couldn’t prevent his dying 5 years before, at 25. And now, 5 years later, Rick’s former boyfriend, Noah, the one who shared with him the pain of loss, asks Dylan to help Alec, a doctor who serves in an free-clinic for homeless people. The task is easy, Dylan restores vintage motorbike and Alec wants to buy an Harley; how he ends being Alec’s backup boyfriend to teach a lesson to Alec’s former boyfriend, Tyler, that is not easy. Especially considering that Dylan is not gay… but maybe he is not even straight.

Alec is an activist through and through, not only he gives his time for free at the clinic, he is also a promoter for same-sex marriage, arriving to be a poster boy for it alongside with his boyfriend Tyler; but now Tyler is gone, he is even in another relationship, and Alec feels lost. Little by little, you arrive to realize that Alec’s driving to a life in couple was yet another way to conform to a society that apparently is denying an ordinary life to him and the LGBT community; instead of fighting for the right to be different, Alec is thriving to be the same, and though, accepted.

On the other side Dylan is against every type of commitment, from him owning 15 bikes, so that basically, he isn’t attached to any of them, to not being with the same woman twice. Everyone he loved, eventually he lost, and he has no intention to give it a try. And then he is not gay… but maybe claiming heterosexuality is only another way to not commit? Meaning that, if he isn’t really with someone he can love, than maybe that is the sure way to remain single.

Series: The Boyfriend Chronicles
Paperback: 278 pages
Publisher: River Jaymes; 1 edition (January 18, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0991280717
ISBN-13: 978-0991280711
Amazon: The Backup Boyfriend: The Boyfriend Chronicles - Book 1
Amazon Kindle: The Backup Boyfriend: The Boyfriend Chronicles - Book 1

More Reviews by Author at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Reviews


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