January 27th, 2014

andrew potter

Alan G. Rogers (September 21, 1967 – January 27, 2008)

Alan Greg Rogers (September 21, 1967 – January 27, 2008) was an ordained pastor, a U.S. Army Major and Intelligence Officer, a civil rights activist in the gay, lesbian and bisexual military community and the first known gay combat fatality of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The subsequent coverage of his death in the media sparked a debate over the effect of the military's "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" (DADT) policy and what information should be included in the biography of a gay military person killed in action. (P: @Patrick High. Major Alan G. Rogers)

At the age of 3, Rogers was adopted by George and Genny Rogers and was their only child. In 1977, the Rogers family moved from New York to Hampton, Florida, near Gainesville. Rogers attended Hampton Elementary School, and ultimately graduated from Bradford County High School in Starke, Florida, in 1985. Rogers joined Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church in Lincoln City, Florida, and was ordained a pastor as a young man. While in high school, Rogers was commander of the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps program and elected by his classmates as the "most intellectual."

After high school, Rogers joined the Reserve Officers' Training Corps program at the University of Florida and then accepted a commission in the United States Army upon graduation with a Bachelor of Arts degree in religion in 1995. Rogers later completed a Master of Arts degree in organizational management from the University of Phoenix through distance learning. Rogers's father, George, died of a heart attack in 2000, and his mother, Genny, died of kidney-related problems two weeks later. Rogers preached at his mother's funeral.

In 2001, Rogers commanded a military intelligence company based out of Waegwan, South Korea. During his tenure as company commander, Rogers emphasized unit morale and cohesiveness, often organizing company wide get togethers and functions.

In 2004, Rogers moved to Washington, D.C. and, in 2005, earned a Master of Public Policy degree from Georgetown University. Only 25 Army officers were accepted into the program. Rogers's thesis adviser was Mark Nadel, who described Rogers as "an officer with leadership qualities that made him think, 'This is a guy I'm going to hear from in 10 years, and he's going to be a general.'" Rogers's thesis examined how the US military’s DADT policy affected recruitment and retention for military officers. In recognition of his achievements at Georgetown, Rogers gained an internship at the Pentagon serving the deputy secretary of defense, Gordon R. England.


@Stagedoorjohnny. Major Alan G. Rogers holding hands with his partner on the left at a same-sex wedding ceremony on June 28, 2006.
Alan Greg Rogers (died on January 27, 2008) was an ordained pastor, a U.S. Army Major and Intelligence Officer, a civil rights activist in the gay, lesbian and bisexual military community and the first known gay combat fatality of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The subsequent coverage of his death in the media sparked a debate over the effect of the military's "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" (DADT) policy and what information should be included in the biography of a gay military person killed in action.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_G._Roger

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Art Bauman (1940 - January 27, 1993)

Art Bauman (c. 1940 - 27 January 1993, Manhattan) was a dancer and choreographer who helped to found the Dance Theater Workshop. He died on 27 January 1993, at Tisch Hospital in Manhattan. He was 53 and lived in Manhattan.

He died of AIDS, said William Singer, his companion.

Mr. Bauman created many of his early dances for Dance Theater Workshop, an informal loft theater when he founded it in 1965 with Jeff Duncan and Jack Moore, both of whom have since died. The organization, which he helped to direct until 1975, later became one of the city's major dance institutions.

Mr. Bauman began choreographing in 1962 and became known for painstakingly planned mixed-media collagist dances that were often designed to be performed in specific theater spaces. In addition to the workshop, Mr. Bauman created pieces for Clark Center for the Performing Arts, the Columbia Arts Festival, Dance Uptown and the Cubiculo. His work was also presented at The Place in London and the New York Dance Festival in Central Park.His best-known dance was "Dialog," a solo in which the choreographer, live and on film, portrayed a businessman racing against time and corporate pressures. Writing in The New York Times, Anna Kisselgoff described the 1965 work as enduring and "a very polished piece."

Mr. Bauman was born in Philadelphia. He was trained in dance at George Washington University in Washington, the Juilliard School, the Metropolitan Opera Ballet School and Martha Graham's studio. He also studied acting at the Herbert Berghof Studio and film at New York University. Mr. Bauman performed in the companies of Lucas Hoving, Paul Sanasardo and Charles Weidman and danced with many of the choreographers who presented pieces at Dance Theater Workshop.

He gradually gave up performing to concentrate on choreography. Throughout his career he also held administrative jobs in dance. He taught choreography at the workshop, Barnard College, New York University School of the Arts, the American Dance Festival at Connecticut College, the Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival and other institutions in the United States and Europe. He also worked as a stage manager at York City theaters including the Kaufmann Concert Hall, the Juilliard Opera Theater and the Lincoln Center Institute. Mr. Bauman retired from dance in 1979.


Art Bauman's Dialog (1967). Photo: Edward Effron, courtesy Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/01/arts/art-bauman-53-choreographer-began-dance-theater-workshop.html

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andrew potter

J.D. Salinger (January 1, 1919 – January 27, 2010)

Jerome David Salinger (January 1, 1919 – January 27, 2010) was an American writer. He last published an original work in 1965, and gave his last interview in 1980. (Picture: Photograph by Lotte Jacobi, 1950)

Seymour: An Introduction was also originally published in The New Yorker, four years after Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters.

As the title suggests, the story represents an attempt by Buddy Glass to introduce the reader to his brother Seymour, who had committed suicide in 1948. The story is told in a stream of consciousness narrative as Buddy reminisces from his secluded home. In the novella someone "seriously considers Mrs. Fedder's remark that Seymour is a "latent homosexual" [p.36), since he has never attempted to seduce Muriel, and that he is ""basically afraid of marriage" [p.36)."

This story, like others concerning the Glass family, touches upon Zen Buddhism, haiku, and the Hindu philosophy of Vedanta.

Raised in Manhattan, Salinger began writing short stories while in secondary school, and published several in Story magazine in the early 1940s before serving in World War II. In 1948 his critically acclaimed story "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" appeared in The New Yorker magazine, which became home to much of his later work. In 1951 his novel The Catcher in the Rye was an immediate popular success. His depiction of adolescent alienation and loss of innocence in the protagonist Holden Caulfield was influential, especially among adolescent readers. The novel remains widely read and controversial, selling around 250,000 copies a year.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._D._Salinger

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Michael Weltmann (February 28, 1949 - January 27, 1992)

Michael Weltmann was born on February 28, 1949, in Trenton, New Jersey, to Louis Nicholas and Jennie Weltmann. He was the eldest of three boys. In 1970 Weltmann earned his BS in Language Arts from Trenton State College(TSC). The years spent at TSC gave birth to his activist career, as he was elected president of the Student Union and also became heavily involved with the Vietnam protests. Weltmann also met Kate Donohue at TSC, and they were married in June of 1970. In 1971 Weltmann and Donohue moved to the Philadelphia area. Weltmann began his twelve year career as a social worker at the Eromin Center, holding positions such as Adolescent Service Director and serving on the Board of Directors. From 1972-75 he advocated for gay children and foster parents, and began a program for them in the Division of Youth and Family Services. From 1973-74 he was involved with the Association of Lesbian and Gay Social Workers. In 1975, Weltmann came out as a gay man, and he and Donohue were divorced.

Weltmann returned to TSC to study nursing in 1984, and graduated in 1987. In August 1987, he moved to New York City and became an RN at New York University Medical Center. He eventually became Assistant Head Nurse, where he remained until 1992. Weltmann's major work began when he became involved with the International Gay Association (later known as the International Lesbian and Gay Association [ILGA]) in 1978. Through his involvement with ILGA he addressed issues ranging from health to international human rights. As co-chair and founder of the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center ILGA Committee in New York City, Weltmann obtained Department of Public Information status for ILGA within the United Nations. He also brought the first openly gay delegation to the U.N. on World AIDS Day of 1991. Shortly after this, on January 27, 1992, Weltmann passed away as a result of AIDS complications.


AIDS Quilt

His papers are held at the Center, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center in NYC.

Source: http://www.gaycenter.org/community/archive/collection/021

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andrew potter

Robert Christian (December 27, 1939 - January 27, 1983)

Robert Christian (also known as Bob and Bobby) was born in Los Angeles on December 27, 1939. He died of AIDS-related complications on January 27, 1983 in New York City at age 43.

Christian had roles on ALL MY CHILDREN and SEARCH FOR TOMORROW, but his biggest soap role was as Bob Morgan on ANOTHER WORLD. He played Bob from January to December in 1982. Bob was married to Henrietta but fell in love with Quinn. He died of a gunshot wound at the video arcade.

Christian last aired a month before he passed away.

His many film credits include Bustin' Loose and ...And Justice for All, which also starred daytime legend Larry Bryggman. In Justice, Christian had a memorable role as a drag queen named Ralph that Al Pacino's lawyer character is defending.

Christian's friend, Bonnie Greer, remembered him in the September 2002 issue of In The Family magazine:
In the role of the Black drag queen whom Pacino helps, is my first friend who died from AIDS, the actor Robert Christian. Bobby was one of those New York actors who could play anything. He lived hard, partied hard, and did all the big roles. One day I got a call from a friend saying that Bobby was in hospital with pneumonia. We all thought it was strange. I expected to see him very soon, being his same crazy self, only, maybe a bit weaker from the illness. Bobby died two weeks after being admitted. No one could understand it. He had gone so quickly, so without warning. It was impossible to imagine the New York theatre world or life without him. I had had a massive crush on him, until I met his gorgeous boyfriend, and to be honest, even he didn’t completely erase my feelings for the handsomest Black man I had ever seen. But it didn’t end there.

AIDS Quilt

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Source: www.welovesoaps.net/2011/11/robertchristian.html

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/
, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4156319.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Robert Christian (December 27, 1939 - January 27, 1983)

Robert Christian (also known as Bob and Bobby) was born in Los Angeles on December 27, 1939. He died of AIDS-related complications on January 27, 1983 in New York City at age 43.

Christian had roles on ALL MY CHILDREN and SEARCH FOR TOMORROW, but his biggest soap role was as Bob Morgan on ANOTHER WORLD. He played Bob from January to December in 1982. Bob was married to Henrietta but fell in love with Quinn. He died of a gunshot wound at the video arcade.

Christian last aired a month before he passed away.

His many film credits include Bustin' Loose and ...And Justice for All, which also starred daytime legend Larry Bryggman. In Justice, Christian had a memorable role as a drag queen named Ralph that Al Pacino's lawyer character is defending.

Christian's friend, Bonnie Greer, remembered him in the September 2002 issue of In The Family magazine:
In the role of the Black drag queen whom Pacino helps, is my first friend who died from AIDS, the actor Robert Christian. Bobby was one of those New York actors who could play anything. He lived hard, partied hard, and did all the big roles. One day I got a call from a friend saying that Bobby was in hospital with pneumonia. We all thought it was strange. I expected to see him very soon, being his same crazy self, only, maybe a bit weaker from the illness. Bobby died two weeks after being admitted. No one could understand it. He had gone so quickly, so without warning. It was impossible to imagine the New York theatre world or life without him. I had had a massive crush on him, until I met his gorgeous boyfriend, and to be honest, even he didn’t completely erase my feelings for the handsomest Black man I had ever seen. But it didn’t end there.

AIDS Quilt

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Source: www.welovesoaps.net/2011/11/robertchristian.html

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/
, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4156319.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

It Happened Today: January 27

Alan G. Rogers (September 21, 1967 – January 27, 2008): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4155661.html

Alan Greg Rogers (died on January 27, 2008) was an ordained pastor, a U.S. Army Major and Intelligence Officer, a civil rights activist in the gay, lesbian and bisexual military community and the first known gay combat fatality of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The subsequent coverage of his death in the media sparked a debate over the effect of the military's "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" (DADT) policy and what information should be included in the biography of a gay military person killed in action.

Alain Daniélou & Raymond Burnier: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4155438.html

Alain Daniélou was a French historian a noted Western convert to and expert on Shaivite Hinduism. He and his partner, Swiss photographer Raymond Burnier, whom he met in the early '30s, first went to India in 1932, and they were fascinated with the art and culture of the nation. Daniélou and Burnier were among the first Westerners to visit India's famed erotic temples in the village of Khajuraho and Burnier's stunning photographs of the ancient temple complex launched the site internationally.

Alan Cumming & Grant Shaffer: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3435504.html

Alan Cumming, OBE (born 27 January 1965), is a Scottish stage, television and film actor, singer, writer, director, producer and author. Cumming lives in New York City with his husband, graphic artist Grant Shaffer, and their dogs, Honey and Leon. The couple dated for two years before entering into a civil partnership at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, London, on January 7, 2007. Cumming and Shaffer remarried in New York on January 7, 2012, the fifth anniversary of their London union.

Art Bauman (1940 - January 27, 1993): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3435681.html

Art Bauman was a dancer and choreographer who helped to found the Dance Theater Workshop. He died on 27 January 1993, at Tisch Hospital in Manhattan. He died of AIDS, said William Singer, his companion. Bauman created many of his early dances for Dance Theater Workshop, an informal loft theater when he founded it in 1965 with Jeff Duncan and Jack Moore, both of whom have since died. The organization, which he helped to direct until 1975, later became one of the city's major dance institutions.

Ethan Mordden (born January 27, 1949): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3062214.html

Ethan Mordden is an American author. After a hiatus of eight years, Ethan Mordden returned in 2006 to the fictional universe for which he is most beloved in this latest, possibly last, volume in his much lauded "Buddies" cycle. Following the exploits of his best-loved characters -- Dennis Savage, J. (who was once Little Kiwi), Carlo, the slowly maturing 'elf-child' Cosgrove, and narrator Bud - as he lays bare the changed emotional landscape of the city within a city that is Gay Manhattan.

J.D. Salinger (January 1, 1919 – January 27, 2010): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3435125.html

Jerome David "J.D." Salinger was an American writer. Seymour: An Introduction was originally published in The New Yorker. As the title suggests, the story represents an attempt by Buddy Glass to introduce the reader to his brother Seymour, who had committed suicide in 1948. In the novella someone "seriously considers Mrs. Fedder's remark that Seymour is a "latent homosexual" [p.36), since he has never attempted to seduce Muriel, and that he is ""basically afraid of marriage" [p.36)."

Michael Weltmann (February 28, 1949 - January 27, 1992): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3435981.html

Michael Weltmann's major work began when he became involved with the International Gay Association (ILGA) in 1978. Through his involvement with ILGA he addressed issues ranging from health to international human rights. As co-chair and founder of the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center ILGA Committee in NYC, Weltmann obtained Department of Public Information status for ILGA within the United Nations. He also brought the first openly gay delegation to the U.N. on World AIDS Day of 1991.

Norman McLaren & Guy Glover: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4156034.html

Norman McLaren (11 April 1914 – 27 January 1987) was a Scottish-born Canadian animator and film director known for his work for the National Film Board of Canada. He was a pioneer in a number of areas of animation and filmmaking, including drawn on film animation, visual music, abstract film, pixilation and graphical sound. His longtime companion was NFB director Guy Glover (November 5, 1910 - May 17, 1988), whom he met at the ballet in London in 1937. They were together until McLaren’s death.

Robert Christian (December 27, 1939 - January 27, 1983): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4156319.html

Robert Christian was born in Los Angeles on December 27, 1939. He died of AIDS-related complications on January 27, 1983 in NYC at age 43. Christian had roles on ALL MY CHILDREN and SEARCH FOR TOMORROW, but his biggest soap role was on ANOTHER WORLD. His many film credits include Bustin' Loose and ...And Justice for All, which also starred daytime legend Larry Bryggman. In Justice, Christian had a memorable role as a drag queen named Ralph that Al Pacino's lawyer character is defending.

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4156477.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

The William Neale Award for Best Gay Romance: To Touch the Stars by Jeremy Pack

The touching the stars achievement is not only the most obvious of Nick Sullivan, who is an astronaut in the run that US is having against URSS to have the first man in space and then on the moon, is also that of Tait William, a news reporter trying to do something good amidst an horrible scenario, on both sides of the Vietnam and Cambodia war. And maybe is also that of Nick and Tait together, living, hating and loving for more than 20 years trying to achieve their little paradise.

This is not an “easy” gay romance, and, apparently, for the most part, romance is not even the main theme, Nick and Tait barely shares a kiss, for a good part of the story they are apart, even paired with different partners; more than once I had the feeling they weren’t destined to be together, they were cross-starred lovers, but the time always seemed wrong. Nick and Tait are both confused, sometime even disgusted by what they feel for each other; instead of listening to their hearts they are easily influenced by enemy words, words of people who have the agenda to set them apart.

It was really difficult at time to believe in a future together for these two, moreover, there wasn’t apparently any pity for their beloved ones, people was dying, from war, from AIDS, from lack of love… how easy it was to let it go, to not being strong; but this is the only important characteristic of Nick, and yes, even Tait, they are strong, and able to overcome the time and years who put them apart.

Paperback: 350 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (August 24, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1623800064
ISBN-13: 978-1623800062
Amazon: To Touch the Stars
Amazon Kindle: To Touch the Stars



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