March 1st, 2014

andrew potter

Statistics: February 2014

Here are the 2 months statistics for the visits on my website and 2 journals:

Site January 2014* February 2014  
elisarolle.com 284.977 305.490 7%
reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org 11.513 10.935  
elisa-rolle.livejournal.com 23.470 33.960  
Total 319.960 350.385 10%
*on a 28 days basis      

there was an increase of the 7% of the visits on the website, and of 10% on the total number of visits for all three locations.



Reminder: starting from January 2014, there is the possibility to place an advertising banner on my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/. The two top banners are already booked for all 2014, but there is still availability for the rotating side menu banners.

Moreover I have a special proposal for spotlight/promotion, to be considered if you have a coming soon release.

For more info please contact me and I will send details.


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andrew potter

Frank Sargeson (March 21, 1903 – March 1, 1982)

Frank Sargeson (21 March 1903 – 1 March 1982) was the pen name of Norris Frank Davey. He is considered one of New Zealand's foremost short story writers. Like Katherine Mansfield, Sargeson helped to put New Zealand literature on the world map.

Born in Hamilton, Sargeson has been credited with introducing New Zealand English into short stories. His technique was to write the story without mentioning the setting. He also used a semi-articulate style which means that the story was written from a naive point of view. Events are simply told but are not explained.

Although Sargeson became known for his literary depiction of the laconic and unsophisticated New Zealand male, his upbringing had in fact been comfortable albeit puritanical. Upon completing his training as a solicitor, he spent two years in the United Kingdom. Sometime in the 1930s, he began living year-round in his parents' holiday cottage at 14A Esmonde Road in Takapuna which was then a northern suburb of Auckland but is now in North Shore City. He eventually inherited the property which became for several decades an important gathering place for Auckland's bohemia and literati.

When Janet Frame was released in 1955 from eight years of voluntary incarceration in New Zealand psychiatric hospitals, Sargeson invited her to stay in an ex-army hut on his property. He introduced her to other writers and affirmed her literary vocation and encouraged her to adopt good working habits. She lived in the shed for about a year, during which time she wrote her first novel, Owls Do Cry.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Sargeson

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Hugh Auchincloss Steers (1962/1963 – March 1, 1995)

Hugh Auchincloss Steers (b. 1962/1963 – March 1, 1995) was a painter whose work is in the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Denver Art Museum. He died of AIDS at the age of 32. He was the brother of filmmaker Burr Steers. He was the grandson of Hugh D. Auchincloss and Nina Gore. He was the half-nephew of both Gore Vidal and Jackie Kennedy.

Hugh Auchincloss Steers, a figurative painter, died on March 1, 1995, at the home of his cousin, Hugh D. Auchincloss Jr. He was 32 and lived in Manhattan.

The cause was AIDS, said his dealer, Richard Anderson.

Mr. Steers, who was born in Washington and studied at Yale University, painted in a style that mixed dreamlike allegory with Expressionist-tinged realism and incorporated art history references. In the last five years his work had increasingly dealt with AIDS. Many of his paintings showed single male figures, almost nude or in women's clothes, isolated in dark rooms; others depicted pairs of men bathing and dressing each other or embracing.

In his last works, shown at the Richard Anderson Gallery in the fall of 1994, Mr. Steers included a recurrent male figure that he regarded as a self-portrait. Dressed in a white hospital gown and white high heels, the figure entered the lives of other characters as both an avenging and a guardian angel.

His work is in the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and the Denver Art Museum.



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Source: http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/04/obituaries/hugh-steers-32-figurative-painter.html

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More Artists at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3486674.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

John Wieners (January 6, 1934 – March 1, 2002)

John Joseph Wieners (6 January 1934 – 1 March 2002) was an American lyric poet.

Born in Milton, Massachusetts, Wieners attended St. Gregory Elementary School in Dorchester, Massachusetts and Boston College High School. From 1950 to 1954, he studied at Boston College, where he earned his A.B. In 1954 he heard Charles Olson read at the Charles Street Meeting House on Beacon Hill during Hurricane Hazel. He decided to enroll at Black Mountain College where he studied under Olson and Robert Duncan from 1955 to 1956. He then worked as an actor and stage manager at the Poet’s Theater in Cambridge, and began to edit Measure, releasing three issues over the next several years.

From 1958 to 1960 Wieners lived in San Francisco, California and actively participated in the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance. The Hotel Wentley Poems was published in 1958, when Wieners was twenty-four.

Wieners returned to Boston in 1960 and was committed to a psychiatric hospital. In 1961, he moved to New York City and worked as an assistant bookkeeper at Eighth Street Books from 1962-1963, living on the Lower East Side with Herbert Huncke. He went back to Boston in 1963, employed as a subscriptions editor for Jordan Marsh department stores until 1965. Wieners’ second book, Ace of Pentacles, was published in 1964.

In 1965, after traveling with Olson to the Spoleto Festival and the Berkeley Poetry Conference, he enrolled in the Graduate Program at SUNY Buffalo. He worked as a teaching fellow under Olson, then as an endowed Chair of Poetics, staying until 1967, with Pressed Wafer coming out the same year. In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War. In the spring of 1969, Wieners was again institutionalized, and wrote Asylum Poems.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wieners

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices


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andrew potter

It Happened Today: March 1

Art Smith & Jesus Salgueiro: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3486176.html

Charles Arthur "Art" Smith (born March 1, 1960) is an American chef who has worked for former Florida governor Bob Graham and Jeb Bush and until 2007 was personal chef to Oprah Winfrey. His expertise is Southern cuisine. Smith lives in Chicago, Illinois with his partner since 1999, Jesus Salgueiro, a painter. The two married at the Lincoln Memorial in 2011. They donate their time to many causes, from children's cooking classes to humanitarian aid. Smith has published two cookbooks.

Bonnie Dee (born March 1, 1961): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4235629.html

Bonnie Dee began telling stories as a child. The Nobleman and the Spy, co-authored with Summer Devon, won a 2011 Rainbow Award as Best LGBT Historical, 3rd place: They once faced each other on a battlefield. Now soldier-turned-spy Jonathan Reese must keep watch over the man he's never forgotten. A close encounter reveals Karl von Binder, the count's son, also recalls the day he spared Jonathan's life. The spy becomes a protector as Jonathan guards the man he's begun to care for.

Bryan Batt & Tom Cianfichi: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4235465.html

Bryan Batt is an American actor best known for his role in the AMC series Mad Men as Salvatore Romano, an art director for the Sterling Cooper agency. Bryan Batt lives with his partner, Tom Cianfichi, an events planner. Batt and Cianfichi have been together since 1989; they met while performing Evita in Akron, Ohio. Batt was playing Che and Cianfichi was the understudy for Magaldi. Batt and Cianfichi own a home decor and furnishings store, Hazelnut, on Magazine Street in New Orleans.

Don Lemon & Ben Tinker: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3486277.html

Donald Carlton Lemon (born March 1, 1966) is an American journalist and television anchor, best known as the host of the prime-time weekend edition of CNN Newsroom, based in Atlanta, Georgia. Since 2007 he is in a relationship with CNN producer, Ben Tinker (b. 1985). In his memoir, Transparent, released in May 2011, Lemon acknowledges publicly that he is gay and discusses racism in the black community, homophobia, and the sexual abuse that he suffered as a child. Lemon won an Emmy Award.

Frank Sargeson (March 21, 1903 – March 1, 1982): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2810857.html

Frank Sargeson was the pen name of Norris Frank Davey. He is considered one of New Zealand's foremost short story writers. Sargeson helped to put New Zealand literature on the world map. He was gay at a time and in a place when homosexuality was illegal in New Zealand. In 1929, he was arrested on a morals charge in Wellington, but later acquitted. Michael King (1995) believes that this trial explains why Sargeson adopted a pen name and never practiced the profession for which he had trained.

Hugh Auchincloss Steers (1962/1963 – March 1, 1995): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3486674.html

Hugh Auchincloss Steers (b. 1962/1963 – March 1, 1995) was a painter whose work is in the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Denver Art Museum. He died of AIDS at the age of 32. He was the brother of filmmaker Burr Steers. He was the grandson of Hugh D. Auchincloss and Nina Gore. He was the half-nephew of both Gore Vidal and Jackie Kennedy. His work is in the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and the Denver Art Museum.

Jay & Andreas Bell: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4235886.html

Jay Bell never gave much thought to Germany until he met a handsome foreign exchange student. At that moment, beer and pretzels became the most important thing in the world. After moving to Germany and getting married, Jay found himself desperate to communicate the feelings of alienation, adventure, and love that surrounded this decision, and has been putting pen to paper ever since. They met on March 1, 2000 and married on September 27, 2003.

John Wieners (January 6, 1934 – March 1, 2002): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/1443883.html

John Joseph Wieners was an American lyric poet. From 1958 to 1960 Wieners lived in San Francisco, California and actively participated in the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance. The Hotel Wentley Poems was published in 1958, when Wieners was twenty-four. A Book of Prophecies was published in 2007 from Bootstrap Press. The manuscript was discovered in the Kent State University archive's collection by poet Michael Carr. It was a journal written by Wieners in 1971, and opens with a poem titled 2007.

Mikhail Kuzmin, Vsevolod Knyazev & Yury Yurkun: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4235194.html

In 1910, Mikhail Kuzmin met his first major love, the poet Vsevolod Knyazev. In the same year, he published The Carillon of Love, a collection of poems written in the style of eighteenth-century pastorals and set to music by Kuzmin himself. Two years later, he published Lakes in Autumn, possibly the work by him that most idealizes homosexuality. Knyazev committed suicide in 1913, and Kuzmin met Yury Yurkun, also a poet, soon after. Kuzmin and Yurkun's relationship lasted until Kuzmin's death.

Oliver Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley & John Boyle: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3786196.html

Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, known as Viscount Corvedale from 1937 to 1947, was a British politician who had a quixotic career at political odds to his father, 3time Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin. Baldwin was homosexual, a fact well known within the family but not to the public (his mother was again supportive and both parents acknowledged his long term relationship with John Boyle). In 1948 he was appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands and took John Boyle with him.

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andrew potter

2014 Rainbow Awards Submission: The Silvers

Gay Sci-fi / Futuristic
The Silvers by Jill Smith
Publisher: Bold Strokes Books (February 16, 2014)
Amazon Kindle: The Silvers

B, captain of the first crewed mission to the Silver Planet, does not think of the planet’s native race as people. Silvers may look human, but their emotional spectrum is severely limited. B allows his team to capture, study, and even kill the creatures.

When B bonds with a Silver called Imms, everything changes. B’s not sure if Imms’s feelings are genuine or imitation, but B’s growing friendship with Imms becomes his anchor in a strange world. Following a shipboard fire that kills most of B’s team, B takes Imms back to Earth. He sanitizes the story of the fire—for which Imms bears some responsibility—so that Imms is recast as its hero rather than its cause.

Life on Earth threatens the fragile connection between the two men. As Imms seeks independence from a bureaucracy that treats him like a test subject, he begins to experience the gamut of emotions—including a love B is frightened to return. And as B and Imms’s story about the fire threatens to unravel, Imms must use all he’s learned about being human to protect B.

Charities Donation program progress:
25$ Point Foundation: www.pointfoundation.org/
25$ Lambda Legal: www.lambdalegal.org/
25$ YouthCare: www.youthcare.org/
53$ COLORS: www.colorsyouth.org/
107$ Galop: www.galop.org.uk/
125$ Cancer Research Institute: www.cancerresearch.org/
140$ SAGE: giveto.sageusa.org/
160$ UCAN: www.ucanchicago.org/
250$ Ali Forney Center: www.aliforneycenter.org/
TOTAL: 910$*

* more than 150$ is a direct donation from a supporter of the Rainbow Awards who isn't submitting; while some authors were more than generous, arriving to donate 5 times the suggested amount, being the submission fee a non mandatory and voluntary direct donation, we were struggling to raise the same amount as last year and there is who decided to cover part of it. I thank you for all you are doing, and if you wish to donate to the above links, please drop me a note with your donation and I will update the total.

2014 Rainbow Awards Guidelines: reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4162490.html

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4236415.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Bonds of Denial (Wicked Play) by Lynda Aicher

This is the second time I read a gay romance from an author who is clearly experienced in writing heterosexual romances (this is part of a series, Wicked Play, which is mostly heterosexual aside from one story about a menages a trois), and to my surprise, I found the author managed to express the issue of a gay relationship in a very convincing way. This is probably due to the fact the focus of the story is the romance, and if you are open enough as a writer, and you don't bring yourself in the story, but write the point of view of your characters, it doesn't matter if they are straight, bisexual or gay, that is the strength of a writer.

Rockford "Rock" Fielding is a closed former military man, who is now working in the security field, and in particular at the Den, the BDSM club whose partners are more or less the main characters of the previous stories in the series. While the other stories are centered around the BDSM world, Bonds of Denial is far from it, the only link the way Rock meets Carter Montgomery. Carter is a high-paid escort, who frequents the Den as guest of one of the members. He underwent a background check performed by Rock who is now fascinated by the man, so much he decides to hire him from one night. Rock isn't considering that fascination can lead to love, and that he will be probably forced to finally come out of the closet.

Carter on the other side is almost at the end of his 10 years contract as an escort, and he is maybe considering his options; not that Rock is an easy getaway from is previous life, Carter is sincerely attracted by Rock, but maybe, more than before, Carter is free to consider a relationship as a possibility. It wasn't easy to have a boyfriend while you are an escort, but truth be told, Rock never lets Carter's job to interfere with their romance, if not for worrying about Carter when he is "on the job".

Very nice "hustler" romance, happily ever after and all. Both Carter than Rock's characters were complex enough to have the reader care for them, and I appreciate a lot the author didn't judge them, nor Carter for his work as an escort, or Rock for being still in the closet at 34.

Publisher: Carina Press (February 3, 2014)
Amazon Kindle: Bonds of Denial (Wicked Play)

Series: Wicked Play
1) Bonds of Trust
2) Bonds of Need
3) Bonds of Desire
4) Bonds of Hope
5) Bonds of Denial

More Reviews by Author at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Reviews


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