March 30th, 2014

andrew potter

Hollis Frampton (March 11, 1936 – March 30, 1984)

Hollis Frampton (March 11, 1936, Wooster, Ohio – March 30, 1984, Buffalo, NY) was an American avant-garde filmmaker, photographer, writer/theoretician, and pioneer of digital art.

Frampton was born March 11, 1936 in Wooster, Ohio. An only child, he was raised primarily by his maternal grandparents.

At the age of 15 he entered Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, where he was accepted on full scholarship. At Andover, Frampton’s classmates and friends included the painter Frank Stella and sculptor Carl Andre. Widely read already as a youth, he had a reputation at Andover as a “young genius” but was also unpredictable: he failed to graduate from Andover, and thus forfeited a National Scholarship to Harvard University, when he failed his history course on a bet that he could pass the final exam without ever reading the textbook. Entering Western Reserve University in 1954, Frampton took a wide variety of classes (Latin, Greek, German, French, Russian, Sanskrit, Chinese, mathematics) but had no declared major. He recounts that when he was called in front of the dean after three and a half years of study and 135 hours of credits and asked, once again, if he intended to take a degree, he was told that if so, he needed to take speech, western civilization, and music appreciation. He replied that “I already know how to talk, I already know who Napoleon was and I already like music” and noted that “For that reason I hold no bachelor's degree. I was very sick of school." During this time he had a short-lived radio show at Oberlin College.

In 1956 Frampton began correspondence with Ezra Pound after becoming interested in the literary generation of the 1880s. In the fall of 1957, he moved to Washington D.C. where he visited Ezra Pound almost daily at St. Elizabeth’s hospital where Pound was finishing part of his Cantos. There, Frampton writes that he was “privy to a most meaningful exposition of the poetic process by an authentic member of the ‘generation of the ‘80’s.’At the same time, I came to understand that I was not a poet.”

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollis_Frampton

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics



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andrew potter

Nella Larsen (April 13, 1891 – March 30, 1964)

Constrained by the social conventions of the time, the bisexual African-American novelist Nella Larsen was covert in her treatment of lesbianism. (Picture: Nella Larsen by Carl Van Vechten)

Larsen was born April 13, 1891 in Chicago, Illinois to a Danish mother and a West Indian father. Throughout her life, her attitude toward the dual heritage of her racially mixed parentage shifted. After studying at Fisk University and the University of Copenhagen, she became a nurse and worked, first, at Tuskegee, Alabama and then, New York City hospitals. She also did social work and, after a training course, became a librarian for the New York Public Library.

In 1919, Larsen married Elmer S. Imes, a physicist, and they became active members of the Harlem social and intellectual elite. Meanwhile, she began to write children's literature.

In the late 1920s, she published two major novels: Quicksand (1928), for which she received the Harmon Foundation Bronze Award, and Passing (1929). A series of wounding events then occurred. She was accused of plagiarism in her short story "Sanctuary," a charge that she denied.

After becoming the first African American to receive a Guggenheim fellowship, which she used to write for a year in Europe, she returned to the United States to face increased marital difficulties, a divorce (1933), and sensational press accounts of the plagiarism controversy. No further evidence of her writing exists.

During the final thirty years of her life, Larsen had a series of nursing jobs in New York City. Forgotten by the literary world, she was found dead in her apartment in 1964. Her life, which presents a pattern of continual futile attempts alternately to separate and to connect the worlds of her experience, is reflected in her fiction, which depicts characters who do the same.



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Citation Information
Author: Lee, Dorothy H.
Entry Title: Larsen, Nella
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2002
Date Last Updated October 11, 2007
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/larsen_n.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date March 30, 2013
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics



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andrew potter

Nick Enright (December 22, 1950 - March 30, 2003)

Nick Enright (22 December 1950 - 30 March 2003) was an Australian playwright.

He was drama captain of St Ignatius' College, Riverview in 1964, where, like Gerard Windsor and Justin Fleming, he was taught by Melvyn Morrow. At that school, he won the 1sts Debating Premiership in both 1966 and 1967.

During 1971 and 1972 Enright was a member of Sydney's Genesian Theatre, performing in A Doll's House and Uncle Vanya, and directing London Assurance. Enright received a pass BA from Sydney University in 1972, having decided not to proceed to an honours degree as might have been expected of one so formidably intelligent. He worked as a gofer for Sydney's Nimrod Theatre before being appointed a trainee director at the Melbourne Theatre Company. He won an Australia Council Fellowship to study directing at New York University, graduating in 1977. On his return to Australia, he joined the State Theatre Company of South Australia as actor and director, later becoming Associate Director. He was Head of Acting at the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) during the 1980s.

He was encouraged to write plays while at NYU by one of his teachers, the playwright Israel Horovitz. His many plays include: Good Works, Daylight Saving, Mongrels (about the relation between Australian playwrights Jim McNeil and Peter Kenna, the latter a friend), The Female Factory, A Man with Five Children, On the Wallaby, and A Poor Student, many of them published by Currency Press. His plays - which include French and Italian translations and adaptations - have been performed by all major Australian theatre companies, including Sydney Theatre Company, Company B, the Australian Opera (as it then was), Melbourne Theatre Company, Queensland Theatre Company, State Theatre Company of South Australia, the Ensemble Theatre, Playbox, La Boite Theatre, and the Australian Theatre for Young People. His one-act theatre-in-education play A Property of the Clan was developed into the full-length play, and later film, Blackrock (1997). He wrote the book and lyrics to a number of musical works: three musicals with Terence Clarke - The Venetian Twins; Variations (Winner, NSW Premier's Literary Play Award, 1983); and Summer Rain (commissioned for a graduating class at NIDA) -, and others with Alan John (Orlando Rourke), David King (The Betrothed, The Voyage of Mary Bryant, The Good Fight), and Max Lambert (Miracle City); and an opera with Graham Dudley (The Snow Queen). He was co-nominated for an Academy Award for his screenplay of Lorenzo's Oil (1992), co-written with its director George Miller. His many other awards include those from the Sidney Myer Performing Arts Awards (1998 Individual Winner), the Australian Writers Guild, the Helpmann Awards, the Green Room Awards, and others.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Enright

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More LGBT History at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Gay Classics


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andrew potter

Catherine Lundoff (born March 30)

Catherine Lundoff is an author and editor, with 5 books currently in print/available as ebooks. She writes in multiple genres including science fiction and fantasy, erotica and romance. Her fiction has won 2008 and 2010 Goldie Awards for erotica, 2008 and 2009 Lesbian Fiction Reader's Choice Awards and been shortlisted for the 2008 Spectrum Award for Short Fiction and the 2009 Goldie Award for speculative fiction. An anthology she edited, "Haunted Hearths and Sapphic Shades", was a Best Other Work at the 2010 Spectrum Awards.

Hellebore and Rue co-edited with JoSelle Vanderhooft won a 2011 Rainbow Award as Best Lesbian Sci-fi/Fantasy, 3rd place.

Further Readings:

Hellebore & Rue: Tales of Queer Women and Magic by JoSelle Vanderhooft and Catherine Lundoff
Paperback: 238 pages
Publisher: Lethe Press (May 1, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1590213777
ISBN-13: 978-1590213773
Amazon: Hellebore & Rue: Tales of Queer Women and Magic

The essence of fantasy is magic and the folklore of women has often dwelt on the innumerable powers they possess. Magic that heals, magic that destroys, magic that saves their community. All these elements and more can be found in the queer women of Hellebore & Rue. These lesbians shape their worlds, their wants and needs, and, most important, their destinies. Here are stories of a greenmage reuniting with her former partner on one last mission in Connie Wilkin's ''The Windskimmer''; a shaman calling on the power of the Medicine Buddha to fight demons in Jean Marie Ward's ''Personal Demons''; and even an aging school nurse discovering a dark secret about her heritage in Steve Berman's ''D is for Delicious.'' A dozen stories by a dozen talented authors, including Juliet Kemp, Lisa Morton, Ruth Sorrell, C. B. Calsing and other names that promise the reader many wonders.

More Rainbow Awards at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2011


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andrew potter

Susan Juby (born March 30, 1969)

I was raised in Smithers, BC, Canada and lived there until I moved to Toronto at age 20. I had a brief and unsuccessful career as a fashion design student and, after I worked at a series of low paying jobs, such as server, record store employee, etc., I began a degree in English Literature at University of Toronto, which I finished at the University of British Columbia. After graduating I became an editor at a self-help/how-to book publishing company based in Vancouver.

When I was a kid I wrote fiction but gave it up for a life of crime (no, not really) until I was about 26, when I started writing in the morning before work, first on the bus, then in a coffee shop. This writing became Alice, I Think, which was first published by a small Canadian press called Thistledown in 2000.

I set out to write a comedy that would make my 30-year-old best friend and my 50-year-old godfather laugh. It was only when it came time to get published that I was told that I'd written a teen novel. I am inspired by writers like Sue Townsend and J.D. Salinger as well as Gerald Durrell, Stella Gibbons, John Kennedy Toole and David Sedaris.

When I first started writing my intention was to write a book about a teenager who doesn't fit in, but doesn't allow that fact to crush her. The Alice MacLeod series is my homage to oddballs. I wanted to create a character who has the courage and integrity to find her own way and define herself independently of other people. I've always admired people who can do that.

Lately, I've decided that my goal is to write every kind of book I love to read. After comedies, my next favourite type of book is the horse book. I was a lunatic for horses when I was younger. I owned several horses (for a time when I was quite young I was convinced I was a horse, but let's keep that between us) and I became obsessed with an equestrian sport called dressage. I quit riding when I left home for college, but part of me always thought I could have been a "contender". (In retrospect, I'm not sure why I would have thought that.) Anyway, I got a nice payday when Alice, I Think was made into a TV series, and the first thing I did was rush out a buy a horse and start working on a book about two young dressage riders. The story was initially about two girls, but soon I fell in love with a secondary character, a boy named Alex, and the book became mainly about him. That is my most recent book, Another Kind of Cowboy.

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Source: http://www.susanjuby.com/

Further Readings:

Another Kind of Cowboy by Susan Juby
Hardcover: 352 pages
Publisher: HarperTeen (December 18, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0060765178
ISBN-13: 978-0060765170
Amazon: Another Kind of Cowboy
Amazon Kindle: Another Kind of Cowboy

For Alex Ford, dressage is an oasis. In the stable, he can slip into his riding pants, shed the macho cowboy image, and feel like himself for a change.

For Cleo O'Shea, dressage is a fresh start. She's got a new boarding school, absentee parents, and, best of all, no one to remember her past. . . .

They're an unlikely pair. Cleo's looking for love, but Alex has a secret he's not ready to give up, and a flirtation with Cleo is the last thing on his mind. But you can't find romance before you know real friendship, and sometimes the last person you'd ever think of as a friend ends up being the one you need the most.

Susan Juby's trademark humor brings life and laughter to this remarkable story of relationships, mixed signals, and the soul-searching that sometimes takes two.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels


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andrew potter

It Happened Today: March 30

Catherine Lundoff (born March 30): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4277978.html

Catherine Lundoff is an author and editor, with 5 books currently in print/available as ebooks. She writes in multiple genres including science fiction and fantasy, erotica and romance. Hellebore and Rue co-edited with JoSelle Vanderhooft won a 2011 Rainbow Award as Best Lesbian Sci-fi/Fantasy, 3rd place: the essence of fantasy is magic and the folklore of women has often dwelt on the innumerable powers they possess. Magic that heals, magic that destroys, magic that saves their community.

Hollis Frampton (March 11, 1936 – March 30, 1984): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3524275.html

Hollis Frampton was an American avant-garde filmmaker, photographer, writer/theoretician, and pioneer of digital art. His most significant work is arguably Zorns Lemma, a film which drastically altered perceptions towards experimental film at the time. He was seen as a structural filmmaker, a style that focused on the nature of film itself. In an interview with Robert Gardner he stated a discomfort with that term because it was too broad and didn't accurately reflect the nature of his work.

Michael Jeter & Sean Blue: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4277445.html

Michael Jeter was a Tony– and Emmy-winning American actor of film, stage, and television. He his best known as Herman Stiles on the sitcom Evening Shade from 1990 until 1994 and for playing Mr. Noodle's brother, Mr. Noodle on Elmo's World from 2000 until 2003. His film roles include Zelig, Waterworld, Air Bud, The Green Mile, Jurassic Park III and The Polar Express. He died on March 30, 2003. Although he had HIV, he had been in good health for many years. His partner since 1995 was Sean Blue.

Nella Larsen (April 13, 1891 – March 30, 1964): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3524544.html

Constrained by the social conventions of the time, the bisexual African-American novelist Nella Larsen was covert in her treatment of lesbianism. In the late 1920s, she published two major novels: Quicksand (1928), for which she received the Harmon Foundation Bronze Award, and Passing (1929). She was accused of plagiarism in her short story "Sanctuary." During the final thirty years of her life, forgotten by the literary world, she was found dead in her apartment in 1964.

Nick Enright (December 22, 1950 - March 30, 2003): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2828183.html

Nick Enright (22 December 1950 - 30 March 2003) was an Australian playwright. He wrote the book of the original version of The Boy from Oz. He edited Holding the Man, a memoir by his former NIDA student, Timothy Conigrave, and, following Conigrave's death, saw it to publication by Penguin Books. n June 2004 he was posthumously made a Member of the Order of Australia for 'service to the performing arts, particularly as a playwright, teacher, actor, director, and as a mentor of emerging talent'.

Paul Verlaine & Arthur Rimbaud: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/1407682.html

Arthur Rimbaud sent Paul Verlaine two letters containing several of his poems. Verlaine, who was intrigued by Rimbaud, sent a reply that stated, "Come, dear great soul. We await you; we desire you." Rimbaud arrived in late September 1871. Rimbaud and Verlaine began a short and torrid affair. On the morning of 10 July 1873, Verlaine bought a revolver. That afternoon Verlaine fired two shots at Rimbaud, wounding him. Rimbaud and Verlaine met for the last time in March 1875, in Stuttgart, Germany.

Susan Juby (born March 30, 1969): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/843339.html

"I was a lunatic for horses when I was younger. I owned horses and I became obsessed with an equestrian sport called dressage. I quit riding when I left home for college, but part of me always thought I could have been a "contender". (In retrospect, I'm not sure why I would have thought that.) The story was initially about two girls, but soon I fell in love with a secondary character, a boy named Alex, and the book became mainly about him. That is my most recent book, Another Kind of Cowboy."

Suzy Solidor & Tamara de Lempicka: http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4277574.html

Suzy Solidor was a French singer and actress, appearing in films such as La Garçonne. Solidor met Tamara de Lempicka sometime in the early 1930s and Suzy asked the artist to paint her. Tamara agreed, but only if she could paint Solidor in the nude. Solidor agreed and the painting was finished in 1933. In 1941 she recorded the song "Lili Marleen" with French words by Henri Lemarchand and was popular with German officers. After the war she was convicted by the Épuration légale as a collaborator.

Wade Rouse (born March 30): http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/1212561.html

We all dream it. Wade Rouse actually did it. In At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream, Wade and his partner, Gary, leave culture, cable, and consumerism behind and strike out for rural Michigan–a place with fewer people than in their former spinning class. There, Wade discovers the simple life isn’t so simple. Battling blizzards, bloodthirsty critters, and nosy neighbors equipped with night-vision goggles, Wade is sorely tested with humorous and humiliating frequency.

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andrew potter

2014 Rainbow Awards Submission: Forgotten

Gay Paranormal Romance
Forgotten by Rider Jacobs

Paperback: 200 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (March 17, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1627984305
ISBN-13: 978-1627984300
Amazon: Forgotten
Amazon Kindle: Forgotten

Some houses come with secrets, and some secrets should never be forgotten.

After eight years together, Peter and Rhys have finally achieved success: good jobs that keep them comfortably fed and a happy married life. The icing on the cake is their move from a small city duplex to a large farmhouse in need of repair.

Peter instantly senses something going on in the house that he can’t put his finger on, something a bit sinister. Things start to happen: whispers in the night, crying only Peter can hear, faucets that turn on for no reason. When Peter starts to dream of a dark-haired young man who tells him how much he loves him, he feels like he’s losing his mind, especially since Rhys doesn’t see or hear anything.

Only after suffering accidents and injuries does Rhys agree the house is haunted, and they’ll have to figure out how to fight a lovesick ghost.

Charities Donation program progress:
25$ YouthCare: www.youthcare.org/
25$ Point Foundation: www.pointfoundation.org/
25$ CARE: careprogram.org/
25$ Lost-n-Found Youth: www.lost-n-found.org/
50$ Wes for Youth: wesforyouth.privacemail.com/
50$ Lambda Legal: www.lambdalegal.org/
83$ COLORS: www.colorsyouth.org/
132$ Galop: www.galop.org.uk/
150$ Cancer Research Institute: www.cancerresearch.org/
160$ UCAN: www.ucanchicago.org/
190$ SAGE: giveto.sageusa.org/
400$ Ali Forney Center: www.aliforneycenter.org/
TOTAL: 1315$*

* more than 150$ is a direct donation from a supporter of the Rainbow Awards who isn't submitting; while some authors were more than generous, arriving to donate 5 times the suggested amount, being the submission fee a non mandatory and voluntary direct donation, we were struggling to raise the same amount as last year and there is who decided to cover part of it. I thank you for all you are doing, and if you wish to donate to the above links, please drop me a note with your donation and I will update the total.

2014 Rainbow Awards Guidelines: reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4162490.html

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