July 13th, 2014

andrew potter

Jeannette Augustus Marks & Mary Emma Woolley

Mary Emma Woolley (July 13, 1863 – September 5, 1947) was an American educator, peace activist and women's suffrage supporter. She was the first female student to attend Brown University and served as the 11th President of Mount Holyoke College from 1900-1937. Woolley, the president of Mt. Holyoke College from 1900-1937, met Professor Jeannette Augustus Marks (1875-1964) while they were both teaching at Wellesley College. The two remained in a relationship for fifty-five years.

Woolley was the daughter of Joseph Duah Woolley and his second wife, Mary Augusta Ferris. She was given the nickname May, and enjoyed a comfortable, nurturing childhood in New England. She was first raised in Meriden, Connecticut and starting in 1871, Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Her father was a Congregational minister and his efforts to incorporate social work into religion, heavily influenced his daughter.

Woolley attended Providence High School and a number of smaller schools run by women before finishing her secondary schooling in 1884 at the Wheaton Seminary in Norton, Massachusetts. Woolley returned to teach there from 1885 to 1891. After traveling through Europe for two months during the summer of 1890, she intended to attend Oxford University, but Elisha Benjamin Andrews, the president of Brown University, convinced Woolley to become the first female student at Brown. She began attending Brown in the Fall of 1890, while still teaching at Wheaton. In 1894, she received her B.A. and in 1895, her M.A. for her thesis titled, "The Early History of the Colonial Post Office."


Mary Emma Woolley (July 13, 1863 – September 5, 1947) was an American educator, peace activist and women's suffrage supporter. She was the first female student to attend Brown University and served as the 11th President of Mount Holyoke College from 1900-1937. Woolley, the president of Mt. Holyoke College from 1900-1937, met Professor Jeannette Augustus Marks (1875-1964) while they were both teaching at Wellesley College. The two remained in a relationship for fifty-five years.



Collapse )

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Emma_Woolley

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3854673.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Louise Blaydon

Louise Blaydon is a writer, specialising primarily in the m/m romance genre. Her interests are esoteric and changeable, and range from linguistic archaeology to modernist poetry; long walks in the cold to lazy drunken evenings; kicking up leaves to sleeping curled up around the cat. Louise has been writing for as long as she can remember, and penned her first half-formed m/m story at the age of eight. Now in her late twenties, she has meandered somewhat, geographically, from her point of origin, and consequently nurses a love of stories of exile, and of landscapes described like lovers.

Louise has written journalistically in the past, but now writes mainly prose fiction. If the occasional poem threatens the calm of her existence, she refuses to be blamed for it.

Summer Song won a 2010 Rainbow Award as Best Gay Young Adult/Coming of Age.

Source: www.goodreads.com/author/show/3977521.Louise_Blaydon

Further Readings

Summer Song by Louise Blaydon
Paperback: 206 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (June 4, 2010)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1615814523
ISBN-13: 978-1615814527
Amazon: Summer Song
Amazon Kindle: Summer Song

Billy Bronner is, to all appearances, every inch the 1950s American dream: handsome, clever, captain of the high school football team, looks good enough in tight jeans that people can even forget he’s Jewish. Then the new guy on the block, the enigmatic Leonard Nachman, turns his head, and over the summer Billy discovers a new world of romance and love—in a man’s arms. But when Kit O’Reilly, Billy’s best friend and shadow, comes home after spending the summer with relatives, he finds Billy acting… differently. Soon enough, it becomes obvious that this change is related to Len, and Kit will have to decide if he’ll accept the relationship Billy and Len have forged, or if he’ll push Billy and their longtime friendship away.

More Rainbow Awards at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2010


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4377824.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Monique Wittig & Sande Zeig

Monique Wittig startled her audience at the Modern Language Association Convention in 1978 when she announced with conviction, "I am a lesbian not a woman." Controversial and brilliant, Wittig produced some of the most challenging fictional and theoretical work of second-wave feminism.

Internationally recognized as a talented experimentalist, Wittig's goal was to "pulverize the old forms and formal conventions." "It is quite possible for a work of literature to operate as a war machine upon its epoch," she said, not by direct political intervention, but rather by linguistically "universalizing" a particular point of view.

Monique Wittig was born in 1935 in Alsace, France; her father was Henri Dubois, a poet. She attended the Sorbonne and studied with some of the great French intellectuals of the time. (Picture: Sande Zeig)

Her first book L'Opoponax, published in Paris in 1964 when she was 28, won the prestigious Prix Médicis and garnered high praise from well-established French writers Marguerite Duras and Natalie Sarraute and, in America, from Mary McCarthy.

The book, about childhood, was purely descriptive and objective, relentlessly in the present and subversively inclusive. Its universalizing point of view provoked readers to enter its world. "I see, I breathe, I chew, I feel through her eyes, her mouth, her hands, her skin ... I become childhood," wrote Claude Simone in his review.


Monique Wittig startled her audience at the Modern Language Association Convention in 1978 when she announced with conviction, "I am a lesbian not a woman." Sande Zeig is from New York. She studied theater in Wisconsin and Paris. In 1975, Zeig was living in Paris, studying mime and teaching karate when she met the writer Monique Wittig. Zeig's 2000 film, The Girl is based on a short story by Wittig. Zeig is the founder of New York film distribution company Artistic License.

Collapse )

Citation Information
Author: Creet, Julia
Entry Title: Wittig, Monique
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2002
Date Last Updated July 6, 2005
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/wittig_m.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date January 3, 2013
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

Collapse )

More Real Life Romances at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3416957.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Oliver Messel & Vagn Riis-Hansen

Oliver Hilary Sambourne Messel (13 January 1904 – 13 July 1978) was an English artist and one of the foremost stage designers of the 20th century. Messel fell in love with Barbados, where he moved in 1966 and spent the last twelve years of his life with his long-term companion and manager, Vagn Riis-Hansen, with whom he had a 30-year relationship. In Barbados he reinvented himself as an architect, designing and decorating houses for private clients, and on nearby Mustique as the architect to the island's owner, the Hon. Colin Tennant. He became beset by ill health and severe financial problems, and died at the home that he had designed for himself—Maddox, St James, Barbados—on 13 July 1978. His ashes are buried in the magnolia garden at Nymans.

Messel was born in London, the second son of Lieutenant-Colonel Leonard Messel and Maud, the only daughter of Linley Sambourne, the eminent illustrator and contributor to Punch magazine. He was educated at Hawtreys, a boarding preparatory school in Kent, Eton — where his classmates included Harold Acton, and Brian Howard — and at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College. After completing his studies, he became a portrait painter and commissions for theatre work soon followed, beginning with his designing the masks for a London production of Serge Diaghilev's ballet Zephyr et Flore (1925). Subsequently, he created masks, costumes, and sets — many of which have been preserved by the Theatre Museum, London — for various works staged by C. B. Cochran's revues through the late 1920s and early 1930s. His work as a set designer was also featured in the US in such Broadway shows as The Country Wife (1936); The Lady's Not For Burning (1950); Romeo and Juliet (1951); House of Flowers (1954), for which he won the Tony Award; and Rashomon (1959), which was nominated for a Tony Award for his costume as well as his set design. He also designed the costumes for Romeo and Juliet; Rashomon; and Gigi (1973), the latter two receiving Tony Award nominations. For film his costume designs include The Private Life of Don Juan (1934); Romeo and Juliet (1936); The Thief of Bagdad (1940); and Caesar and Cleopatra (1945). For Romeo and Juliet he also served as Set Decorator. He was Art Director on Caesar and Cleopatra (1945), On Such a Night (1956) and Production Designer on Suddenly Last Summer (1959), for which he was nominated for the Academy Award.


The famous Messel Penthouse Suite at London’s Dorchester Hotel
Oliver Messel was an English artist and one of the foremost stage designers of the 20th century. Messel fell in love with Barbados, where he moved in 1966 and spent the last twelve years of his life with his long-term companion and manager, Vagn Riis-Hansen, with whom he had a 30-year relationship. In Barbados he reinvented himself as an architect, designing and decorating houses for private clients, and on nearby Mustique as the architect to the island's owner, the Hon. Colin Tennant.


Rex Whistler; Gerald Tyrwhitt-Wilson, 14th Baron Berners; Oliver Messel; Cecil Beaton, by Cecil Beaton, bromide print, 1931, 7 7/8 in. x 7 6/8 in. (203 mm x 197 mm), Accepted in lieu of tax by H.M. Government and allocated to the Gallery, 1991, Photographs Collection, NPG x40681

Collapse )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Messel

Images: http://cotedetexas.blogspot.com/2009/02/mr-barbados-oliver-messel-retrospective.html (many more there if you are interested!)

Collapse )

More Designers at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art

More Real Life Romances at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2889448.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Dale Peck & Lou Peralta

Dale Peck (born 1967 on Long Island, New York) is an American novelist, critic, and columnist. His 2009 novel, Sprout, won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children's/Young Adult literature, and was a finalist for the Stonewall Book Award in the Children's and Young Adult Literature category. Peck lives in New York City with his husband, Lou Peralta, where he teaches in the Graduate Writing Program of the New School. The dedica of Shift is: "To my husband, Lou Peralta, for his unwavering love and support during the writing of this book"

Dale Peck was born on Long Island in 1967, moved to Kansas when he was seven, then returned to the East Coast to attend college at Drew University.

In 1993, he published his first novel, Martin and John, which the New York Times called “a brilliant debut.” Two more novels followed: The Law of Enclosures (1996), which was adapted into a feature film by John Greyson starring Sarah Polley and Diane Ladd, and Now It’s Time to Say Goodbye (1998), which prompted Michiko Kakutani of the Times to write: “All of thirty years old, Mr. Peck has more than fulfilled the promise of his first two novels: he has taken on the same big themes Toni Morrison tried with less success to address in Paradise…and delivered a novel commensurate with his ambitions.”


Dale Peck is a novelist, critic, and columnist. His 2009 novel, Sprout, won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children's/Young Adult literature, and was a finalist for the Stonewall Book Award in the Children's and Young Adult Literature category. Peck lives in New York City with his husband, Lou Peralta, where he teaches in the Graduate Writing Program of the New School. The dedica of Shift is: "To my husband, Lou Peralta, for his unwavering love and support during the writing of this book"

Collapse )

Source: http://dalepeck.com/about.html

Collapse )

Further Readings:

Sprout by Dale Peck
Reading level: Ages 14 and up
Hardcover: 288 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Childrens (May 26, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1599901609
ISBN-13: 978-1599901602
Amazon: Sprout

How many secrets can you hide in plain sight?

Sprout Bradford has a secret. It’s not what you think—he’ll tell you he’s gay. He’ll tell you about his dad’s drinking and his mother’s death. The green fingerprints everywhere tell you when he last dyed his hair. But neither the reader nor Sprout are prepared for what happens when Sprout suddenly finds he’s had a more profound effect on the lives around him than he ever thought possible. Sprout is both hilarious and gripping; a story of one boy at odds with the expected.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Lists/Gay Novels


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3214484.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

2014 Rainbow Awards Submission: JL Merrow

Gay Contemporary Romance
Fall Hard by JL Merrow
Publisher: Samhain Publishing, Ltd. (September 17, 2013)
Amazon Kindle: Fall Hard

Some memories are better off lost in the mist…

Eight months ago, British academic Paul Ansell lost his lover—and all the memories of their time together—in an accident at Iceland’s Gullfoss Falls. Returning to the misty island country to resume his study of the bloodthirsty Viking Egil Skallagrimsson is tough as he struggles to pull his life back together.

First, there’s his colleague, Mags, who treats him like glass, and summer student Alex, who peppers him with discomforting questions. Then there’s Icelandic jet-boat driver Viggo, a tattooed, modern-day Viking who won’t say much about how they know each other. Leaving Paul to wonder if their volcanic attraction is fuelled by a desire to make a fresh start, or desperation to forget the past.

As more fragments of his lost memories fall into place, Paul is unsure if he can trust himself, much less anyone around him. And he begins to suspect his accident was nothing of the kind.

Gay Mystery / Thriller
Relief Valve (The Plumber's Mate) by JL Merrow
Publisher: Samhain Publishing, Ltd. (March 25, 2014)
Amazon Kindle: Relief Valve (The Plumber's Mate)

If you dig up the past, be prepared to get dirty.

The Plumber’s Mate, Book 2

It hasn’t been all smooth sailing since plumber Tom Paretski and P.I. Phil Morrison became connected at the heart, if not always at Tom’s dodgy hip. Neither of their families has been shy about voicing their disapproval, which hasn’t helped Tom’s uneasy relationship with his prickly older sister, Cherry.

But when Cherry is poisoned at her own engagement party, the horror of her near death has Tom’s head spinning with possible culprits. Is it her fiancé Gregory, a cathedral canon with an unfortunate manner and an alarming taste for taxidermy? Someone from her old writers’ circle, which she left after a row? Or could the attack be connected to her work as a barrister?

Phil is just as desperate to solve the case before someone ends up dead—and he fears it could be Tom. At least one of their suspects has a dark secret to hide, which makes Tom’s sixth sense for finding things like a target painted on his back...

Gay Romantic Comedy
Caught! (The Shamwell Tales) by JL Merrow
Publisher: Samhain Publishing, Ltd. (August 19, 2014)
Amazon Kindle: Caught! (The Shamwell Tales)

You can run from the past…but the past runs faster.

Shamwell Tales, Book 1

Behind Robert’s cheerfully eccentric exterior lies a young heart battered and bruised by his past. He’s taken a job teaching in a village primary school to make a fresh start, and love isn’t part of his plans. But he’s knocked for six—literally—by a chance encounter with the uncle of two of his pupils.

Sean works in pest control, rides a motorbike, and lives on a council estate. On the face of it, he shouldn’t have anything in common with Robert’s bow-tie, classic-car style and posh family background. Yet Robert is helpless to resist Sean’s roguish grin, and a rocky, excruciatingly embarrassing start doesn’t keep the sparks between them from flaring.

Despite Robert’s increasingly ludicrous attempts to keep his past where it belongs, his past hasn’t read the memo. And soon his secrets could be the very things that drive Sean away for good...

Charities Donation program progress:
303$ Albert Kennedy Trust: http://www.akt.org.uk/
965$ Ali Forney Center: www.aliforneycenter.org/
25$ Audre Lorde Project: http://alp.org/
25$ BiNet US: http://www.binetusa.org/
75$ CARE: careprogram.org/
100$ The Center Colorado: http://www.glbtcolorado.org/
392$ COLORS: www.colorsyouth.org/
80$ Covenant: www.covenanthouseno.org/
75$ Diversity Role Models: http://www.diversityrolemodels.org/
25$ The Diversity Center: http://diversitycenter.org/
317$ Galop: www.galop.org.uk/
150$ GLYS: http://www.glyswny.org/
100$ Human Rights Campaign: http://www.hrc.org/
50$ Huntsville GLBT Advocacy & Youth Services: http://www.glbtays.org/
75$ It Gets Better: http://www.itgetsbetter.org/
100$ Inland Northwest LGBT Center: www.thelgbtcenter.org/
235$ Lambda Legal: www.lambdalegal.org/
50$ Lambert House: www.lamberthouse.org/
50$ Lancaster LGBT Center: http://www.centralpalgbtcenter.org/
50$ LEAP: http://www.glbtleap.org/
462$ Lost-n-Found Youth: www.lost-n-found.org/
130$ Moveable Feast: http://www.mfeast.org/
25$ Odyssey Youth Center: www.odysseyyouth.org/
25$ Out Youth: outyouth.org/
100$ PFLAG: community.pflag.org/
175$ Point Foundation: www.pointfoundation.org/
100$ Ruth Ellis Center: http://www.ruthelliscenter.org/
575$ SAGE: giveto.sageusa.org/
25$ Terrence Higgins Trust: www.tht.org.uk/
280$ The Trevor Project: www.thetrevorproject.org/
160$ UCAN: www.ucanchicago.org/
25$ WayGay: http://www.waygay.org/
200$ You Can Play: http://youcanplayproject.org/
50$ YouthCare: www.youthcare.org/
997$ Other Funds
TOTAL: 6471$

* more than 150$ is a direct donation from a supporter of the Rainbow Awards who isn't submitting; while some authors were more than generous, arriving to donate 5 times the suggested amount, being the submission fee a non mandatory and voluntary direct donation, we were struggling to raise the same amount as last year and there is who decided to cover part of it. I thank you for all you are doing, and if you wish to donate to the above links, please drop me a note with your donation and I will update the total.

2014 Rainbow Awards Guidelines: reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4162490.html

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4377901.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

2014 GRL Blog Tour: Andrew Q. Gordon

Starting from March up until September I will be part of the 2014 GRL Blog Tour as featured blogger. I will host authors attending the GayRomLit Retreat in Chicago (October 16-19, 2014: gayromlit.com/content/2014-grl-featured-blogger-program). To my guests, I asked to brainstorm around the common theme "inspiration". Today author is Andrew Q. Gordon:

Of Men and Music

I've wanted to write since I was a kid. I remember trying to write a book at twelve – didn't have a clue what it really took and that effort went nowhere. I tried again in high school. The result wasn't a whole lot better, in part because, well at sixteen, I had a quite a few competing interests for my time. While in college, I took a creative writing course and figured – I'll write an entire novel in a semester. My instructor toned down my expectations and opened my eyes that writing took a lot more than just ideas and a way to put them on paper.



After college came the real world – reality can be harsh. Work was going to be a piece of cake. Get up, go to work, and when I finished I'd have the rest of the day free. I even took a new writing course to get myself back on track. Somehow I never found all that 'free time' I expected to have once I didn't need to spend the day in class and then studying (and let's be honest, I probably spent more time partying, having fun and hanging out then going to class and studying.) Here again, there was always something else I needed/wanted to do that took priority over things like reading and writing.

The real change for me came when I settled down. Going to a club lost a lot of its allure once you found your significant other. I'd say, 'sure it was fun once and a while,' but the reality was, it wasn't fun for us after we'd been together a few years. We tried the – 'let's go out with our couple friends,' but that meant the four of us stood around, nursing a drink or two, shouted at each other for a couple hours and went home wondering WTF made us think going there was a good idea.



I finally had my much-coveted free time to do what I'd always wanted – write. That's when I learned it took more than just the time to write. I needed a muse, inspiration, something to motivate me.

Wouldn't it make for a beautiful post if I wrote here that I found all three in Mike, my then significant other, now husband? It would be one of those 'aww' moments that cause people to create Facebook posts with sappy titles like – He Encouraged His Husband to Chase His Dreams and You'll Never Believe What Happened Next. Okay, put away the tissues, it wasn't one of those moments. But he was my motivation.

Mike suggested I do, really do it. Not put a few thoughts down, but get started, write and then finish what I started. That was the kick in the pants I needed, someone to encourage me to stick with it. Sort of like a personal trainer for writing. It proved to be the missing ingredient.

Armed with the motivation, I set out to find my inspiration. I'm sure many writers find inspiration in music. For me, like so much else about me, it works in a convoluted, round–about way. The entire Champion of the Gods series was born from an obscure 3-minute song. I was listening to the live version of 10,000 Maniacs. Stockton Gala Days was playing and I 'saw' the image of what will be—after many revisions and changes—part of the last battle scene. I wrote out the scene quickly and over time it changed quite a bit, but it was the basis of the entire series. Whenever I play that song, I can 'see' where I was when the image for the story came to me. Despite the many incarnations the 'story' has taken to bring it to print, I've kept the original version just because.

Peter, Paul and Mary—yes, I know I'm dating myself, but I heard them when I was a very little kid—sang, For Baby (For Bobbie). That song—specifically the words¬—inspired my current WIP – Harp Strings, which is about a gay college student who fathered a child and ended up having sole custody. The words speak to me as a father and how I feel when I look at my daughter. I wanted to capture that feeling in a story. Unfortunately, due to copyright laws, I can't actually use the lyrics in the song without paying a fee and right now that isn't in my budget. Maybe if the book sells well enough I can go back and add the lyrics as a part of a revised edition.

Two down, one to go. Where would I find my muse, that force to get me humming and able to get out the head full of ideas I knew I had, but couldn't get out? Erato didn't seem to answer my prayers, until I realized she had. I liked to listen to music when I wrote and often times it would bring me inspiration, but it did more than that; it helped me to focus. Not the words, but the melody.

Although some people can't understand, I can push the music—even the hard pounding, punk songs I favor—to the background. I hear it, but I don't listen. No matter how loud, music doesn't disturb me like the usual sounds of an office, house, or coffee shop. It allows me to concentrate on getting the words out and getting them out right.

Different songs help me write different emotions. The Offsprings' Half-Truism and Hands Held High, by Linkn Park helped me write the death of characters. I've listened to Victory and Walk Away by Bad Religion (heck, half of Bad Religion's songs for that matter) quite a lot when I need to write fight scenes. And I don't think I could write a wedding scene without Pachelbel's Canon in D or Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor.

While writing part of what will be book four of Champions, I listened to Rise Against—specifically, Collapse. The music fit the scene, so I played it many times as wrote, reworked and self edited that chapter. Now whenever I hear that song, I think of what that part of the book.

I'm sure as I continue to write, I'll find new music songs to draw out the stories I want to tell. Discovering these new songs is part of the adventure. I'm free to seek them out because my motivation is the same as it's always been. Years later he still encourages me to do what I enjoy. And in the end, that is all the inspiration I need.

Giveaway: The author is giving away a copy of Purpose to one reader. Leave a comment below to enter.
You can comment on LJ or DW if you have an account (I will send a PM to the winner), if you don't have an account, please leave a comment on DW with a contact email.

Purpose by Andrew Q. Gordon
Paperback: 270 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (June 21, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1623805198
ISBN-13: 978-1623805197
Amazon: Purpose
Amazon Kindle: Purpose

Forty years ago the Spirit of Vengeance—a Purpose—took William Morgan as its host, demanding he avenge the innocent by killing the guilty. Since then, Will has retreated behind Gar, a façade he uses to avoid dealing with what he’s become. Cold, impassive, and devoid of emotion, Gar goes about his life alone—until his tidy, orderly world is upended when he meets Ryan, a broken young man cast out by his family. Spurred to action for reasons he can't understand, Gar saves Ryan from death and finds himself confronted by his humanity.

Spending time with Ryan helps Will claw out from under Gar’s shadow. He recognizes Ryan is the key to his reclaiming his humanity and facing his past. As Will struggles to control the Purpose, Ryan challenges him to rethink everything he knew about himself and the spirit that possesses him. In the process, he pushes Will to do something he hasn't done in decades: care.

About the Author: Andrew Q. Gordon wrote his first story back when yellow legal pads, ball point pens were common and a Smith Corona correctable typewriter was considered high tech. Adapting with technology, he now takes his MacBook somewhere quiet when he wants to write. He currently lives in the Washington, D.C. area with his partner of eighteen years, their young daughter and dog. In addition to dodging some very self-important D.C. 'insiders', Andrew uses his commute to catch up on his reading. When not working or writing, he enjoys soccer, high fantasy, baseball and seeing how much coffee he can drink in a day and not get the shakes.

Find all his published works on his site: The Land of Make Believe.

Social Media Links:
Follow Andrew on his website: www.andrewqgordon.com,
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/andrewqugordon,
On Twitter: @andrewqgordon,
Or just email him: andrewqgordon@gmail.com




This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4378170.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.