November 29th, 2014

andrew potter

Lloyd Schwartz & Ralph Hamilton

Lloyd Schwartz (born November 29, 1941) is an American poet who is Frederick S. Troy Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is also Classical Music Editor of The Boston Phoenix and a regular commentator for NPR's Fresh Air.

Lloyd Schwartz was born in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Queens College, New York in 1962 and earned his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1976.

Schwartz's books of poetry include Cairo Traffic (University of Chicago Press, 2000) and the chapbook Greatest Hits 1973-2000 (Pudding House Press, 2003) , which were preceded by Goodnight, Gracie (1992) and These People (1981). He edited the collection Elizabeth Bishop and Her Art (University of Michigan Press, 1983). In 1990, he adapted These People for the Poets' Theatre in a production called These People: Voices for the Stage, which he also directed.

Schwartz was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1994 for his work with The Boston Phoenix.

Schwartz served as co-editor of an edition of the collected works of Elizabeth Bishop for the Library of America, entitled Elizabeth Bishop: Poems, Prose, and Letters (2008).

His poems, articles, and reviews have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Vanity Fair, The New Republic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Agni, The Pushcart Prize, and The Best American Poetry. Between 1968 and 1982 he worked as an actor in the Harvard Dramatic Club, HARPO, The Pooh Players, Poly-Arts, and the NPR series The Spider's Web, playing such roles as Scrooge (A Christmas Carol), the Mock Turtle (Alice in Wonderland), Froth (Measure for Measure), Trofimov (The Cherry Orchard), Zeal-of-the-Land Busy (Bartholomew Fair), The Worm (In the Jungle of Cities), Krapp (Krapp's Last Tape), the Disciple John (Jesus: A Passion Play for Cambridge), and played a leading role in Russell Merritt's short satirical film The Drones Must Die. He also directed two operas, Ravel's L'Heure Espagnol (Boston Summer Opera Theatre) and Stravinsky's Mavra (New England Chamber Opera Group), 1972.


Lloyd Schwartz and Ralph Hamilton, 1988, by Robert Giard
Lloyd Schwartz is an American poet who is Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is also Classical Music Editor of The Boston Phoenix and commentator for NPR's Fresh Air. His partner was artist Ralph Hamilton: "My lovable, impossible friend of more than 30 years, the artist Ralph Hamilton, died on February 19, of complications from diabetes. He was one of Boston's most original and searching painters and had been doing some of his most ambitious and moving work."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Schwartz

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Lloyd Schwartz's farewell to his partner, Ralph Hamilton: My lovable, impossible friend of more than 30 years, the artist Ralph Hamilton, died on February 19, of complications from diabetes. He was only 59. It’s a very sad loss. He was one of Boston’s most original and searching painters and had been doing some of his most ambitious and moving work.

He was a local guy. He grew up in Newton Upper Falls and lived in Somerville. His degree was from the Massachusetts College of Art. His studio was at the Boston Center for the Arts, where he served at least one term as artist representative to the board of trustees, fighting on behalf of the other resident artists. He refused to teach but was a generous mentor to numerous fellow artists. His paintings are in the collections of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, the Addison Gallery, the Rose Art Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He received major awards from the Pollack-Krasner and Ingram Merrill Foundations.

Part Anglo-Scottish and part French-Canadian, he was very quiet, moody, but had a dark sense of humor — his irreverence amused his friends and horrified his acquaintances. He hated the sun, loved stormy weather; his favorite color was gray. That dark spirit was reflected in the images he painted. Catastrophes — burning buildings, crashing vehicles, hurricanes, murder victims, executions — are among his central subjects. Also — and odd for someone with no interest whatsoever in athletics — sports. He made baseball, basketball, and soccer players (players he may never have heard of but who are instantly recognizable) look like dancers. Yet his sports figures are also battered: a boxer with his face smashed in, a high jumper leaping over the bar, a skater in a deep backbend, Mickey Mantle swinging a bat, Roger Clemens throwing a ball are his contemporary equivalents of Renaissance crucifixions. His paintings are unflinching, and they’re mysteriously beautiful.

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Source: http://thephoenix.com/boston/arts/6022-ralph-hamilton/#ixzz2LL2ZSRUZ

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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andrew potter

Peter Cameron (born November 29, 1959)

Peter Cameron (born 29 November 1959 in Pompton Plains, New Jersey) is an American novelist and writer living in New York, NY. He is best known for his novels Andorra, The Weekend and The City of Your Final Destination.

Cameron grew up in Pompton Plains, New Jersey, and in London, England. He spent two years attending the progressive American School in London, where he discovered the joys of reading, and began writing stories, poems, and plays. Cameron graduated from Hamilton College in New York State in 1982 with a B.A. in English literature.

He sold his first short story to The New Yorker in 1983, and published ten more stories in that magazine during the next few years. This exposure facilitated the publication of his first book, a collection of stories titled One Way or Another, published by Harper & Row in 1986. One Way or Another was awarded a special citation by the PEN/Hemingway Award for First Book of Fiction. In 1988, Cameron was hired by Adam Moss to write a serial novel for the just-launched magazine, 7 Days. This serial, which was written and published a chapter a week, became Leap Year, a comic novel of life and love in New York City in the twilight of the 1980s. It was published in 1989 by Harper & Row, which also published a second collection of stories, Far-flung, in 1991.

Beginning in 1990, Cameron stopped writing short fiction and turned his attention toward novels. His second novel, The Weekend, was published in 1994 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux, which also published a third novel, Andorra, in 1997, and a fourth, The City of Your Final Destination, in May 2002. His work has been translated into a dozen languages.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Cameron_(writer)
Talk about a perfect performance - and making it look easy! Cameron never slips, but neither does the book feel too polished or fussed over. Andorra is a relaxed, confident, mature performance, and a daring one: Cameron's Andorra both is and isn't the real Andorra; and the book concludes with a genuine and haunting surprise. Hollywood should be calling. Or better yet, a European director with a very fine eye. --David Pratt
Someday This Pain Will be Useful to You is one of the only true books ever written about youth—that bittersweet moment when our longings are more than we can be. It helps that every sentence is exquisitely calibrated. --Michael Downing
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Further Readings:

Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You by Peter Cameron
Paperback: 240 pages
Publisher: Picador; First Edition edition (April 28, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0312428162
ASIN: B003JTHSBI
Amazon: Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You
Amazon Kindle: Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You

Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You is the story of James Sveck, a sophisticated, vulnerable young man with a deep appreciation for the world and no idea how to live in it. James is eighteen, the child of divorced parents living in Manhattan. Articulate, sensitive, and cynical, he rejects all of the assumptions that govern the adult world around him--including the expectation that he will go to college in the fall. he would prefer to move to an old house in a small town somewhere in the Midwest. Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You takes place over a few broiling days in the summer of 2003 as James confides in his sympathetic grandmother, stymies his canny therapist, deplores his pretentious sister, and devises a fake online identity in order to pursue his crush on a much older coworker. Nothing turns out how he'd expected.

"Possibly one of the all-time great New York books, not to mention an archly comic gem" (Peter Gadol, LA Weekly), Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You is the insightful, powerfully moving story of a young man questioning his times, his family, his world, and himself.

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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andrew potter

Willa Okati (born November 29)

"A multi-published author of GLBT erotic, romantic fiction since 2004, I love trying new things -- I have 1001 crazy ideas and want to write them all! I exist primarily on caffeine and pixels, take “camera shy” to a whole new level, and persist in trying to learn the pennywhistle despite being woefully tone-deaf. During the summer, I’m a wild woman with henna."

Further Readings:

The Name of the Game by Willa Okati
Paperback: 192 pages
Publisher: Torquere Press (August 11, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1603700110
ISBN-13: 978-1603700115
Amazon: The Name of the Game

Seth's a gorgeous hunk of a cop, but off-limits to his roommate Clay, who's desperately trying to find a way to stop thinking about a man who's straight. Seth's also dating Sophie, the bitchy, possessive, girlfriend from hell, so it's a moot point as far as Clay is concerned. Seth is a good guy, a clean cop and a good friend. But when it comes to the girlfriend, he's not sure how to get her out of the picture. When Seth decides to dump Sophie by pretending to be gay, it's Clay he turns to for help in his game of deception. He's seen the way Clay looks at him, even though they've never made a big deal out if it. Surely Clay will help. Clay's been alone a good while, but with his friend Anthony pushing him into playing the dating game and helping Seth, Clay's relationship options suddenly go from zero to a full hand. There's still only one man for Clay, and as Seth begins to discover just what it's like walking the other side of the line, the two men start to break all the rules.

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels

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andrew potter

New Release: Blackmail, My Love, A Murder Mystery

San Francisco, 1951. Josie O’Conner’s gay brother is nowhere to be found. What’s a loving sister to do? Josie sets off to clear his name, halt the blackmailers, and exact justice for the mounting number of corpses. First-time novelist Katie Gilmartin breaks into noir fiction with her brilliantly conceived, illustrated thriller, Blackmail, My Love: A Murder Mystery. With a doctoral background in Queer Studies, Gilmartin reveals secret histories of San Francisco’s mid-century queer underground as we follow her into a world of corruption, coercion, murder, and mystery.

Blackmail, My Love: A Murder Mystery by Katie Gilmartin
Paperback: 232 pages
Publisher: Cleis Press; proof edition (November 18, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1627780645
ISBN-13: 978-1627780643
Amazon: Blackmail, My Love: A Murder Mystery
Amazon Kindle: Blackmail, My Love: A Murder Mystery

Josie O'Conner travels to San Francisco in 1951 to locate her gay brother, a private dick investigating a blackmail ring targeting lesbians and gay men. Jimmy's friends claim that just before he disappeared he became a rat, informing the cops on the bar community. Josie adopts Jimmy's trousers and wingtips, battling to clear his name, halt the blackmailers, and exact justice for the many queer corpses. Along the way she rubs shoulders with a sultry chanteuse running a dyke tavern called Pandora's Box, gets intimate with a red-headed madam operating a brothel from the Police Personnel Department, and conspires with the star of Finocchio's, a dive so disreputable it's off limits to servicemen — so every man in uniform pays a visit.

Blackmail, My Love is an illustrated murder mystery deeply steeped in San Francisco's queer history. Established academic and first-time novelist Katie Gilmartin's diverse set of characters negotiate the risks of same-sex desire in a tough time for queers. Humor leavens the grave subject matter. Set in such legendary locations as the Black Cat Cafe, the Fillmore, the Beat movement's North Beach, and the sexually complex Tenderloin, Blackmail, My Love is a singular, visually stunning neo-noir experience.

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andrew potter

Rainbow Awards pre-party and 8th anniversary (Day 29)

November 2014 marks the 8th anniversary since I opened my first journal on LJ, and the 6th anniversary of the Rainbow Awards and we will have again a 1 month long big bash party. 120 authors, all of them in the 2014 Rainbow Awards, have donated an ebook and I will use them for a Treasure Hunt. Every day, for all November, I will post 4 excerpts (a random page of the book). No reference to title, or author, or publisher. You have to match it with the book ;-) comment on the blog (do not leave anonymous comments, if you post as anonymous, leave a contact email (comments are screened)), you can comment 1 time for more matchings (you can even try for all 4 books if you like, so 4 chances to win every day). Until the end I will not say which matching is right, so you will have ALL month to try. No limit on how many books you can win, the more you try the better chance you have to win. End of November, among the right matchings, I will draw the winners. So now? let the game start!

If at the end of the treasure hunt there will be still unmatched excerpts the giveaway will go to the one who matched more books.

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Previous Post - Next Post

Today excerpts are:

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andrew potter

2014 Rainbow Awards - Cover Contest

We have 15 covers in the poll, the list of covers is:

89 - The Tin Box ( Anne Cain )
98 - London Calling ( Kevin Pruitt )
115 - The House on Hancock Hill ( Brooke Albrecht )
120 - Stitch ( Eli Easton )
123 - Out of Hiding ( Paul Richmond )
207 - Bitter Waters ( Elizabeth Leggett )
212 - Love Lessons ( Kanaxa )
245 - Perfect Imperfections ( Reese Dante )
263 - Not In The Stars ( Freddy MacKay )
305 - Splinters ( Thorny Sterling )
330 - Omorphi ( Reese Dante )
385 - Balefire ( TreeHouse Studio )
402 - The Silence of the Stars ( Aaron Anderson )
446 - That Certain Something ( Fereday Design )
454 - Pray The Gay Away ( Sara York )

To vote for the covers you like you can use the following form: http://www.elisarolle.com/rainbowawards/covers.php (you have to vote for at least 3 covers otherwise the vote is void; no limit on how many covers you can vote)

The poll will remain open for 2 weeks until November 29.



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