March 12th, 2015

andrew potter

Jill Shultz (born March 12, 1964)

Born in Brooklyn, New York before it was cool, Jill Shultz now lives upstate and will always be equal parts city and country: defining moments in her life occurred in the cafeteria of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and a cave in New Hampshire. She has a B.S. in Biology from Cornell University and M.S.T. in Environmental Sciences from Antioch University. For most of her career, she zigzagged between environmental and arts organizations. It seemed she'd bag every independent Audubon Society in New England, but she missed by half. She's been a land steward, zookeeper, the program director of Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance, and always a writer. Plunk her in a chair with a great book or next to a pond with herons or and she can be engrossed for hours.

Angel on the Ropes won a 2013 Rainbow Award as Best B/T & LGBT Fantasy, Paranormal Romance & Sci-fi / Futuristic.

Further Readings:

Angel on the Ropes by Jill Shultz
Paperback: 287 pages
Publisher: Jill Shultz; 1 edition (June 1, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0984889221
ISBN-13: 978-0984889228
Amazon: Angel on the Ropes
Amazon Kindle: Angel on the Ropes

Dazzling trapeze artist Amandine Sand leads a perilous double life. Will her secret—and her choices—save her planet or ruin it?

Amandine walks a high wire between two lives—hobbled by a life-threatening secret. She’s one of the spotted humans wrongly accused of being a plague carrier. These “leopards” are hunted by zealots to protect their offworld colony from the scourge. Despite this threat, Amandine spends her days guiding other leopards to an underground shelter run by the pacifist Seekers. At night, with her own spots hidden, she takes to the air, the one place this extraordinary artist feels free and gloriously alive.

When the persecution of leopards explodes into widespread violence, the Seekers demand more of her time. But her circus is teetering toward bankruptcy and desperately needs her, too. She has no time to breathe... and then she meets a stranger who leaves her breathless. And might just be the biggest risk of all. If her trust is misplaced and she’s unmasked, everyone she loves—and everything she’s fought for—could crash.

Now she must make an irrevocable leap. Without a net.

To survive, Amandine must draw upon everything she’s learned from the circus and Seekers and summon the courage to reveal her true colors. But can a pacifist defend her violent enemies to stop a civil war? And can this reluctant angel fly beyond her limits to save her life, her love, and her world?

More Rainbow Awards at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2013

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andrew potter

Anthony Stewart & James Clark

James Clark (born 12 March 1963) is a British diplomat. On 30 March 2004, he and his partner Anthony Stewart made history by becoming the first officially recognised gay couple to have an audience with Queen Elizabeth II. (P: Luc Deflorenne. James Clark)

Britain's Foreign Office didn't wait for enactment of the bill to recognize at least one gay male couple. Britain's ambassador to Luxembourg James Clark registered his partnership with Anthony Stewart under the Foreign Office's five-year-old plan extending benefits to unmarried partners. When Clark was given a formal audience with Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace, Stewart was by his side, as the first same-gender partner to be received by the Queen just as heterosexual ambassadors' spouses are. Clark is Britain's first openly gay ambassador and he and Stewart are the Foreign Office's first officially recognized gay couple to be sent abroad. They moved into the official residence in Luxembourg and attended social functions there together.

The reaction to his homosexuality in Luxembourg? “It was very welcoming, very open. There never seems to have been an issue. People just took it in their stride. It depends on how you approach it yourself. In a sense, you are in a position to create problems when you expect problems. Sometimes people then sense that worry. But if you are comfortable and approach people with the idea that there will be no problem, it's easier for everyone.” (http://www.paperjam.lu/article/fr/luxembourg-disproportionately-influential)

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Clark_(British_diplomat)

More LGBT Couples at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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andrew potter

Barbara Macdonald & Cynthia Rich

Barbara Anne (Charles) Macdonald, social worker, lesbian feminist activist, and author, was born on September 11, 1913, to Emily Lister (Baker) Charles and Fred Henly Charles in Pomona, California. She grew up around the La Habra, California, area. At the age of fifteen, she left home permanently and began supporting herself as a domestic worker in Long Beach, California. In 1930 Macdonald married Elmo Davis; the marriage lasted five years. She attended Long Beach Junior College (1931-1932), Santa Ana Junior College (1932-1937) where she was almost expelled as a lesbian, and the University of California, Berkeley (1938-1940). She paid for her education by working as a stunt parachute jumper about which she was the subject of numerous articles in The Santa Ana Register, which called her "intrepid and daring." Macdonald married John Macdonald in 1941; the marriage was very brief.

After leaving the University of California, Berkeley, Macdonald worked at WPA Vallejo (Calif.) Housing Authority. From 1950 to 1953 she attended the University of Washington where she received a B.A. and an M.S.W. Upon graduation she moved to Wenatchee, Washington, and worked as a supervisor for Child Welfare Services. In 1957 she moved to Morgantown, West Virginia, and commuted to the University of Pennsylvania where she worked on a 3rd year certificate in psychiatric social work. Subsequently she worked as a clinical social worker in pediatrics at the University of Maryland and taught at the medical school. She lived in Baltimore from 1964 to 1967 and worked as a school social worker in the Baltimore public schools. During this time, she took up sailing and bought the sailboat "Mighty Mouse." In 1967 she moved to Connecticut where she worked as a consultant for the Bureau of Pupil Personnel and Special Education for the state of Connecticut. Macdonald and her companion Ethel Weeden, also a social worker, took a year's leave to travel the country in a Volkswagen bus. They followed that with a trip via freighter to Asia.


Cynthia Rich and Barbara Macdonald, 1997, by Robert Giard
Cynthia Rich, teacher, lesbian feminist activist, and author, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 12, 1933, the daughter of Helen (Jones) and Arnold Rice Rich. Her sister was Adrienne Rich. In 1974 she taught a writing workshop at Goddard Cambridge College, where she met Barbara Macdonald, who became her domestic partner of 26 years. In 1983 Rich co-authored with Macdonald Look Me in the Eye: Old Women, Aging and Ageism, a ground-breaking examination of ageism from a feminist perspective.
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00340

Cynthia Rich, teacher, lesbian feminist activist, and author, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 12, 1933, the daughter of Helen (Jones) and Arnold Rice Rich. Her sister was Adrienne Rich. In 1952 she graduated from the Roland Park Country School in Baltimore, and then received her A.B. in English summa cum laude from Radcliffe College in 1956. During her junior year, she made Phi Beta Kappa, and in 1956 won first prize in the Mademoiselle fiction contest for her story, "My Sister's Marriage." She also received the Augustus Anson Whitney Fellowship from Harvard University (1957-1958). Rich received her A.M. in English (1958), and completed residence requirements and oral examinations for a Ph.D. in English from Harvard in 1960. Rich married Roy Glauber, a member of the physics department at Harvard in 1960. They had two children: Jeffrey (1963- ) and Valerie (1970- ). The couple separated in 1971; they divorced in 1975.

Rich taught expository writing, fiction, and poetry writing at Wellesley College (1962-1963), Cooper Community College (1965-1969), and Harvard University (1958-1961, 1969-1981) . She held the Briggs Copeland Lecturership in English and General Education at Harvard (1969-1970). In 1974 she taught a feminist writing workshop at Goddard Cambridge College, where she met Barbara Macdonald, who later became her domestic partner of 26 years. Rich helped establish the Harvard Writing Center in 1978 in which she remained involved for two years. In 1980, she covered the UN Mid-Decade Conference on Women in Copenhagen for Equal Times. From 1980 until 1981 she directed independent studies in writing for M.A. candidates at Goddard and consulted for the New York City Office of Educational Evaluation before joining Digital Equipment Company in Nashua, N.H., as a software editor.

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Source: http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00340

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Gervase Griffiths & Patrick Procktor

Patrick Procktor RA (12 March 1936 – 29 August 2003) was a prominent English artist of the late 20th century. He was too tall- well over 6ft- to be an exquisite, but flamboyant he certainly was. He dressed exotically and flaunted his homosexual preferences; this was to the detriment of his sales from at least one exhibition, in 1968 in New York, which he devoted to paintings of his lover at the time, Gervase Griffiths. It was a one-man show which Procktor insisted on calling a one-boy show. Its failure, though, was probably more a comment on an uncharacteristic lack of variety than an expression of homophobia.

Griffiths, former Gordonstoun head boy, was a model and the lead singer with a psychedelic folk band of little note called Noah and the Quince. A swaggering, Jaggerish young man, he had Procktor smitten. For two years Procktor painted only Gervase, and when he was offered a one-man exhibition at the Nordness Gallery in New York in 1968, the whole show was devoted to this new muse. It was not a critical success, and when Procktor returned to London, Gervase travelled to Haiti with Patrik Steede, a friend of Derek Jarman with an interest in voodoo. 

Patrick Procktor was born in Dublin, the younger son of an oil company accountant, but moved to London when his father died in 1940. From the age of 10, he attended Highgate School – where his teachers included landscape painter Kyffin Williams – intending to read classics at university. However, his mother's income was insufficient to fund his further education and after a period working with a north London builders' merchants 18-year-old Procktor was conscripted into the Royal Navy where, during his National Service, he learned to speak Russian.


Patrick Procktor & Gervase Griffiths by Cecil Beaton
Patrick Procktor was a prominent English artist of the late 20th century. He was too tall- well over 6ft- to be an exquisite, but flamboyant he certainly was. He dressed exotically and flaunted his homosexual preferences; this was to the detriment of his sales from at least one exhibition, in 1968 in New York, which he devoted to paintings of his lover at the time, Gervase Griffiths. It was a one-man show which Procktor insisted on calling a one-boy show. Procktor died in 2003, aged 67.


Patrick Procktor, Charles Newington on Zattere, Galerie Biedermann


There was a time when Patrick Procktor was as famous as David Hockney. 'You couldn't really mention one without the other. It was like Castor and Pollux. They were the dandy twins of the art world,' explains John McEwen in his book, Patrick Procktor: Art and Life, by Ian Massey. The artists met when they were still at art school: 'We started talking, and we just became friends quickly,' says Hockney. We simply had a lot of interests in common – painting, literature, and being gay, then.'

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Procktor

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More Artists at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art

More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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Richard Glatzer & Wash West

Richard Glatzer (January 28, 1952 – March 10, 2015) was an American writer and director. Glatzer married writer and director Wash Westmoreland in September 2013. On March 10, 2015, he died of complications from ALS. “I am devastated,” Westmoreland said in a statement. “Rich was my soul mate, my collaborator, my best friend and my life. Seeing him battle ALS for four years with such grace and courage inspired me and all who knew him. In this dark time, I take some consolation in the fact that he got to see Still Alice go out into the world. He put his heart and soul into that film, and the fact that it touched so many people was a constant joy to him. “Thank you to everyone for this huge outpouring of love. Richard was a unique guy — opinionated, funny, caring, gregarious, generous and so so smart. A true artist and a brilliant man. I treasure every day of the short 20 years we had together. I cannot believe he has gone. But in my heart and the hearts of those who loved him, he will always be alive.”

Glatzer was born in Flushing, Queens. He grew up in Westbury, Long Island and Livingston, New Jersey, then gained a bachelor's degree in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and a PhD in English from the University of Virginia.

His entered the film world in the mid-1980s working under the tutelage of Jay and Lewis Allen. He worked on TV shows such as Divorce Court, The Osbournes, and America's Next Top Model. Glatzer's first independent film was Grief (1993), a comedy-drama focusing on a writer for a trashy daytime TV show who comes to grips with office politics, a co-worker crush and homophobia. It premiered at San Francisco's Frameline Festival where it won the Audience Award for Best Picture. It then went onto Toronto, where it was picked out by former LA Weekly critic Manhola Dargis as one of the festival highlights. It starred Craig Chester, Illeana Douglas, Alexis Arquette, Jackie Beat, Carlton Wilborn, and Lucy Gutteridge.


Credit Emily Berl for The New York Times
Richard Glatzer was an American writer and director. Glatzer married writer and director Wash Westmoreland, an independent film director, in September 2013. Glatzer and Washmoreland's first collaboration was The Fluffer, a look at obsession, addiction and power relationships in the gay porn industry. “It just hit us like a complete bombshell,” Wash Westmoreland said of the news that his husband had A.L.S. Their experience helped shape their last film “Still Alice,” winner of an Academy Award for Best Actress (Julianne Moore). On March 10, 2015,
Glatzer died of complications from ALS.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Glatzer

Wash Westmoreland (born March 4, 1966) is an independent film director who has worked in television, documentaries, independent films. His 2006 release, Quinceañera, had a double Sundance win (Audience Award and Grand Jury Prize), and also picked up the Humanitas Prize, and the John Cassavetes Spirit Award. In 2008, Westmoreland produced an MTV film Pedro about AIDS activist Pedro Zamora that was introduced on MTV by U.S. President Bill Clinton. Working with his partner Richard Glatzer, he directed The Last of Robin Hood in 2012 starring Kevin Kline, Susan Sarandon and Dakota Fanning that was released in August 2014 by Goldwyn. The duo's next film Still Alice, based on Lisa Genova's NYT bestselling book, stars Julianne Moore, Kristen Stewart, and Alec Baldwin. It premiered at Toronto Film Festival in 2014 and was considered the discovery of the festival.

Wash Westmoreland was born Paul Westmoreland in Leeds, England on March 4, 1966. His father was a maintenance engineer for the CEGB and his mother worked as a receptionist at a local hair salon. He was named "Paul" after a member of the The Beatles but received the nickname "Wash" as a child. He finished high school intending to pursue science at university level, but after a short disruptive spell in a religious cult changed his direction to study social science. Westmoreland earned his college degree in Politics and East Asian Studies at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Fukuoka University in Japan, graduating in 1990. He emigrated to America in 1992, initially living in New York City, then moving to New Orleans and finally to Los Angeles in 1995.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wash_West

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