March 13th, 2015

andrew potter

Kaje Harper aka Kira Harp (born March 13, 1960)

"I've been writing since I could put words together. Early stories were about dolls and horses and kids who surmounted the odds and came home with a kitten. Gradually I learned about punctuation and point-of-view and my characters grew up. But real life came along, with forays into psychology and teaching and then a biomedical career and children. Writing happened in my head, for my own amusement, but didn't make it to paper.

Then several years ago, my husband gave me a computer. And my two girls were getting older and developing their own interests. So I sat down and typed out a story. Or two. Or three. Now I have adult novels published, and my love of Young Adult fiction has led me to share some of my YA stories.

These days I write constantly, read obsessively, and share my home with my younger teenager, my amazingly patient husband, and a crazy, omnivorous little white dog. I can be found at my author page on Goodreads, or (in my adult fiction alter-ego), moderating the YA LGBT Books group there. I look forward to sharing many more stories with YA readers in the future."

Nor Iron Bars A Cage won a 2013 Rainbow Award as Best Gay Fantasy. Rainbow Briefs won a 2014 Rainbow Award as Best LGBT Anthology / Collection.

Further Readings:

Nor Iron Bars A Cage by Kaje Harper
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Amazon Kindle: Nor Iron Bars A Cage

First I was a sorcerer. Then I was a hermit. For so long—for years that seemed to go on forever—I couldn't bear to be touched. I put up not just walls but whole stone bunkers to keep everyone out, emotionally, and physically as well. I was protected from people, from ghosts, from specters real and imagined. Sure, I was alone. But I felt safe. Only, after a while, I wasn't sure any longer whether a totally "safe" empty life was really worth living.
Then Tobin came along. Out of the blue, out of my past, with a summons from the king that he wouldn't let me ignore. I tried to cling to my isolation, but he wouldn't give up on me. Tobin never believed in walls.

This story was written as a part of the M/M Romance Group's "Love Has No Boundaries" event. Any author royalties from this story will be donated to the Gay Men's Domestic Violence Project (GMDVP).

Rainbow Briefs by Kira Harp
Paperback: 218 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 2, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 149361083X
ISBN-13: 978-1493610839
Amazon: Rainbow Briefs
Amazon Kindle: Rainbow Briefs

Have you ever looked at a picture, perhaps a photo of two guys in a tight hug, or two girls holding hands, and wondered, What happened before that moment? What will they do next? These fifteen stories were inspired by images from the Young Adult LGBT Books Group. In these pages you'll find LGBTQ teenagers living their lives - experiencing first encounters and long relationships, coming out, staying closeted, questioning, loving, having adventures, dealing with family, with prejudice, with magic. Author Kira Harp provides this collection of Young Adult romantic, fantasy, and contemporary short stories. Any author royalties from this book will be donated to the Trevor Project which provides crisis intervention and resources for LGBTQ youth.

More Rainbow Awards at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2013 & 2014

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4544126.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Brian Howard & Sam Langford

Brian Christian de Claiborne Howard (13 March 1905 – 15 January 1958) was an English poet, whose work belied a spectacularly precocious start in life; in the end he became more of a journalist, writing for the New Statesman. He led a very active social life, tried to come to terms with his homosexuality, and published only one substantial poetry collection God Save the King (1930, Hours Press). He was active as a poet during the Spanish Civil War, but did not ultimately invest in his work with seriousness. He drank heavily and used drugs. Sam Langford (d. 1958) was the Irish-born companion to Brian Howard, from 1943 onwards. Langford liked to sail and commanded an Air-Sea Rescue Launch in the British navy during the war. He was invalidated out of the navy with a foot problem and briefly worked for the BBC before travelling and living abroad with Howard. Like Howard, Langford became addicted to drugs. He died in his bath when he was gassed by a faulty water heater at the house he shared with Howard and Howard's mother in the south of France. A few days later, Howard committed suicide by taking an overdose of sedatives.

Howard will write, in different moment in his life: "I am doing my utmost to involve myself emotionally with Sam, and have only succeeded so far physically. I feel quite unsafe still. But I never intend to let Sam go." And later: "I am now really, to tell the truth, violently in love with Sam. I have received a letter from him which almost made me cry."

Howard was born to American parents in Hascombe, Surrey, of Jewish descent, and brought up in London; his father Francis Gassaway Howard was an associate of James Whistler. He was educated at Eton College, where he was one of the Eton Arts Society group including Harold Acton, Oliver Messel, Anthony Powell and Henry Yorke. He entered Christ Church, Oxford in 1923, not without difficulty. He was prominent in the group later known as the Oxford Wits. He was one of the Hypocrites group that included Harold Acton, Lord David Cecil, L. P. Hartley and Evelyn Waugh.


Brian Howard in drag for a non-pro theatrical performance
Brian Howard was an English poet, whose work belied a spectacularly precocious start in life; in the end he became more of a journalist, writing for the New Statesman. Sam Langford was the Irish-born companion to Brian Howard, from 1943 onwards. Like Howard, Langford became addicted to drugs. He died in his bath when he was gassed by a faulty water heater at the house he shared with Howard in the south of France. A few days later, Howard committed suicide by taking an overdose of sedatives.


After a double funeral, Brian Howard & Sam Langford were buried together at the Cimetière Caucade de Nice, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France.

Collapse )

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Howard_(poet)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4134075.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Dorothy Sander & Joyce Warshow

Joyce Warshow (March 13, 1937 - October 2, 2007) died at home on October 2, 2007 at the age of 70. She died with her beloved partner of 25 years, Dorothy Sander, at her side. She created a deep family with many close friends as well as her family of origin: two brothers and a sister-in-law, nieces and nephews, grand-nieces and grand-nephews and an extended family of choice. (Picture: Lesbian Herstory Archives co-founder Joan Nestle, right, with filmmaker Joyce Warshow, who captured Nestle’s life in the documentary "Hand on the Pulse.")

Joyce came from an activist Jewish background. While not religious, she came from a strong cultural Jewish world. As a child she attended the famous Yiddish summer camp, Camp Boiberik. She lived a rich and full life on her own terms, remaining true to herself and her values. She chose action over passivity. She chose to reform rather than to conform. Her diverse background and interests led her down many paths. As a renowned feminist, filmmaker, psychologist, educator, author, and activist who fully invested herself in every fiber of her work — literally, physically, metaphorically — Joyce touched the lives of many. (
Picture: Dorothy Sander)

She was a formidable champion for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights. She conducted sensitivity trainings with the New York City Police Department to explore the roots of hate crimes against gays. She was a leading spokesperson against ageism in the LGBT community and was honored by Senior Action in A Gay Environment (SAGE) with its Lifetime Achievement Award for her work. Sadly, she died before she was able to accept the award. 


Joyce Warshow, Adrienne J. Smith and Barbara Sang, 1991, by Robert Giard
Joyce Warshow was a formidable champion for LGBT rights. She was honored by Senior Action in A Gay Environment (SAGE) with its Lifetime Achievement Award for her work. Sadly, she died before she was able to accept the award, at home on October 2, 2007 at the age of 70. Her beloved partner of 25 years, Dorothy Sander, was at her side. As a filmmaker, Joyce was dedicated to presenting a full spectrum of pioneering lesbian activists: her two films and a documentary about Joan Nestle.

As a filmmaker, Joyce was dedicated to presenting a full spectrum of pioneering lesbian activists. She sought to determine how these women's experiences influenced their lives as activists. Her films, Some Ground to Stand On (1998) and The Biography of Blue Lunden and Hand on the Pulse (1992), a documentary about Joan Nestle, profiled older lesbian activists.
Joyce was brilliant, gentle, loving. Though she was always busy doing so much, perhaps too much, she seemed to have time for all. We were all so lucky to have her in our lives. My heart goes out to Dorothy and all her other friends. --Karla Jay
Source: http://jwa.org/weremember/warshow

Collapse )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3299403.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Harold Cheevers & Sir Hugh Walpole

Sir Hugh Seymour Walpole (13 March 1884 – 1 June 1941) was an English novelist. A prolific writer, he published thirty-six novels, five volumes of short stories, two plays and three volumes of memoirs. His skill at scene-setting, his vivid plots, his high profile as a lecturer and his driving ambition brought him a large readership in the United Kingdom and North America. A best-selling author in the 1920s and 1930s, his works have been neglected since his death. (Picture: Sir Hugh Walpole, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934)

Walpole's commercial success enabled him to maintain an expensive lifestyle, with a flat in Piccadilly, London, and a large house, Brackenburn, on the slopes of Catbells overlooking Derwentwater in the Lake District. A discreet homosexual, Walpole spent much time and energy looking for "the ideal friend". From 1926 to his death, his chief companion was Harold Cheevers, a married former policeman, whose official role was Walpole's chauffeur. Other important figures in Walpole's life included Percy Anderson and Lauritz Melchior.

Walpole was born in Auckland, New Zealand, the eldest of three children of the Rev George Henry Somerset Walpole (1854–1929), Canon of St Mary's Cathedral, Auckland (later Bishop of Edinburgh from 1910 to 1929) and his wife, Mildred Helen née Barham (1854–1925). Walpole was educated at a series of boarding schools in England, principally at Truro School for two years, the King's School, Canterbury for two years and as a day boy for four years at Durham School, when his father was principal of Bede College at the university. Walpole's popular character Jeremy lived in the cathedral town of Polchester in Glebeshire, an amalgam of Truro and Durham, which featured in many of his later books. The dust-jacket of The Inquisitor (1935) depicted a street map of this imaginary town. Walpole's brief experience of teaching is reflected in his third novel Mr Perrin and Mr Traill.


Sir Hugh Walpole is best remembered for the fictional Herries family chronicle: Rogue Herries, Judith Paris, The Fortress, and Vanessa. At the end of 1924, Walpole met Harold Cheevers, a constable who had been Revolver Champion of the British Isles and who soon became his friend and companion and remained so for the rest of Walpole's life. In Hart-Davis's words, he came nearer than any other human being did to Walpole's long-sought conception of a perfect friend. Walpole provided a house in Hampstead for Cheevers and his family. 

Collapse )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Walpole

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2859508.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Harper Fox & Jane

Bestselling British author Harper Fox (born March 13, 1965) has established herself as a firm favourite with readers of M/M romance. Over the past three years, she's delivered thirteen critically acclaimed novels, novellas and short stories, including the CAPA-nominated Salisbury Key, and 2011 Band of Thebes Best LGBT Book Life After Joe. Harper takes her inspiration from a wide range of British settings - wild countryside, edgy urban and most things in between - and loves to use these backdrops for stories about sexy gay men sharing passion, adventure and happy endings. She has recently launched her own publishing imprint, FoxTales.

Harper lives in beautiful rural Cornwall with Jane (born October 10, 1963), her partner of 27 years, and three high-maintenance cats. She'd love to tell you what she does when she's not writing, but the sad truth is she simply can't remember.

They married on September 2012.


Harper Fox is an English author who has written many critically acclaimed novels in the M/M romance genre. Over the past three years, Harper Fox's delivered thirteen critically acclaimed novels, novellas and short stories. Harper lives in beautiful rural Cornwall with Jane, her partner since 1984, and three high-maintenance cats. Harper and Jane married in September 2012. She would love to tell you what she does when she is not writing, but the sad truth is she simply cannot remember. 

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4256151.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Janet Flanner & Solita Solano

Janet Flanner was a novelist, translator, and journalist, best known for her fortnightly "Letter from Paris," which she wrote for the New Yorker from 1925 to 1975. (Picture: Janet Flanner by Berenice Abbott)

Flanner had an affair with Edith WHARTON, but Solita Solano, a well-known writer and drama critic for the New York Tribune, was her greatest love. They remained close for over sixty years. Another long-term lover was Natalia Danesi Murray, an Italian-born radio broadcaster who later became vice president of Rizzoli publishers.

She was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on March 13, 1892. She matriculated at the University of Chicago in 1912, but left the University after two rocky years, worked for a time in a girls' reformatory, then in 1916 became a drama and art critic for the Indianapolis Star.

Toward the end of World War I, Flanner, married to a man she did not love, moved to New York City where she became acquainted with Harold Ross and his wife Jane Grant. They introduced her to the most profound and enduring love of her life, Solita Solano, drama editor for the New York Tribune.

In New York, Flanner explored her sexuality, participated in the suffrage movement and early feminist organizations, and moved in the circle of the Algonquin Round Table. As she began to find her own place among the strong and stimulating professional women of Greenwich Village and as her relationship with Solano intensified, the illusion of her marriage became increasingly difficult to maintain.


Janet Flanner and Solita Solano in Greece
Janet Flanner was a novelist, translator, and journalist, best known for her fortnightly "Letter from Paris," which she wrote for the New Yorker from 1925 to 1975. Flanner had an affair with Edith WHARTON, but Solita Solano, a well-known writer and drama critic for the New York Tribune, was her greatest love. They remained close for over sixty years. Another long-term lover was Natalia Danesi Murray, an Italian-born radio broadcaster who later became vice president of Rizzoli publishers.

Collapse )

Citation Information
Author: Law, Carolyn Leste
Entry Title: Flanner, Janet
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2002
Date Last Updated August 10, 2002
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/flanner_j.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date November 7, 2012
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

Solita Solano, real name Sarah Wilkinson (born 1888 in Troy, New York, died 22 November 1975 in Orgeval near Paris) was an American writer, poet and journalist.

Sarah Wilkinson came from a middle-class family and attended the Emma Willard School in Troy. After the death of her father she left home and married her childhood sweetheart Oliver Filley. They spent the next four years in the Philippines, in China and Japan, where her husband worked as an engineer. They returned to New York in 1908 where she started work as a theatre critic with the New York Tribune and as a freelance contributor to the National Geographic Society. At this time she changed her name to Solita Solano.

In 1919 Solano got to know the journalist Janet Flanner in Greenwich Village with whom she started a relationship. In 1921 they travelled to Greece, where Janet was to work on a report for the "National Geographic" on Constantinople. Solano had three books published, and as they were not very successful, returned to journalism. In the following year they travelled to France. In Paris they joined the intellectuel-lesbian circles of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, Natalie Clifford Barney, Romaine Brooks and Djuna Barnes. In 1929 Solano had an affair with Margaret Anderson, founder of The Little Review, who had come to Paris with her lover, French singer Georgette Leblanc. The affair lasted several years, though Anderson remained living with Leblanc.

Collapse )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solita_Solano

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3335044.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

David Bergman (born March 13, 1950)

David Bergman (born March 13, 1950) is a Professor of English at Towson State University, and is the author of Gaiety Transfigured: Gay Representation in American Literature and the editor of Camp Grounds: Style and Homosexuality. Bergman has published poetry in The Paris Review, The New Criterion, and The New Republic. He has edited a collection of Edmund White's essays entitled The Burning Library, and is presently working on a history of the Violet Quill group. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Karl Woelz is the Lambda Literary Award-winning co-editor of the Men on Men series begun by the late George Stambolian. Woelz's Introduction and searing Afterword to M2m New Literary Fiction volume has already begun some heated debate about the state of literature in the gay and lesbian community. Woelz pulls no punches in taking the publishing industry to task for giving the country mediocre options when it comes to GLBT books.

Further Readings:

Men on Men 2000: Best New Gay Fiction edited by David Bergman & Karl Woelz
Paperback: 350 pages 
Publisher: Plume (January 1, 2000) 
Language: English 
ISBN-10: 0452280826 
ISBN-13: 978-0452280823 
Amazon: Men on Men 2000: Best New Gay Fiction

Now spanning eight volumes and two decades, the Men on Men series continues to showcase the remarkable talent of gay literary writers. These venerable collections of short stories have become a gay literary institution, launching the careers of several, now luminary, writers--including Joe Keenan, Christopher Bram, Dale Peck, and David Leavitt. True to its tradition, Men on Men 2000 brings bright new literary talent together with established writers--such as Edmund White and Brian Bouldrey--to offer a poignant collection of gay fiction that is provocative and illuminating at every turn. This diverse group of voices etches an indelible portrait of gay life at the dawn of the twenty-first century, addressing issues such as identity and gender stereotypes, the power of love, the lingering shadow of AIDS, and the new adventure of fatherhood. Stories by:
Brian Bouldrey
Jeff Kuhr
Kelly McQuain
Craig T. McWhorter
Bruce Morrow
Jim Provenzano
Michael Villane
Edmund White
and 12 others

More Spotlights at my website: elisarolle.com, My Lists/Gay Novels


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/3394666.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

John Greyson & Stephen Andrews

John Greyson (born March 13, 1960) is a Canadian filmmaker, whose work frequently deals with gay themes. Greyson is also a video artist, writer and activist; he is currently a professor at York University, where he teaches film and video theory and film production and editing. Greyson has been living together with Stephen Andrews, his boyfriend since 1996. Andrews is a fellow artist whose medium is contemporary photo-based conceptual art. They live in a working class Portuguese neighborhood in Toronto and have known each other since they were teenagers.

Greyson was born in Nelson, British Columbia, the son of Dorothy F. (née Auterson) and Richard I. Greyson. He was raised in London, Ontario. He moved to Toronto in 1980, becoming a writer for The Body Politic and other local arts and culture magazines, and becoming a video and performance artist.

He directed several short films, including The Perils of Pedagogy, Kipling Meets the Cowboy and Moscow Does Not Believe in Queers, before releasing his first feature film, Pissoir, in 1988. Pissoir is a response to the homophobic climate of the period and, particularly, to police entrapment of men in public washrooms (toilets) and parks and police raids on gay bathhouses.

Greyson's next film was The Making of "Monsters", a short musical film produced during Greyson's residency at the Canadian Film Centre in 1991. The film deals with the 1985 murder by five adolescent males of Kenneth Zeller, a high school teacher and librarian, when he was allegedly cruising for sexual encounters in Toronto's High Park. The film is a fictional documentary about the making of a movie-of-the-week, entitled Monsters, in which the young murderers are depicted as psychopathic monsters, rather than normal teenage boys. The film features Marxist literary critic Georg Lukács as the producer of Monsters, with Bertolt Brecht (played by a catfish) as director. Greyson's film was pulled from distribution when the estate of Kurt Weill objected to its use of the tune of Mack the Knife. Greyson had originally received copyright permission to use the tune, but it was withdrawn, apparently because Weill's estate objected to the film's homosexual themes. Although copyright is no longer an issue, having lapsed in 2000, fifty years after Weill's death, the film has not yet been re-released by the Canadian Film Development Corporation.


John Greyson is a Canadian filmmaker, whose work frequently deals with gay themes. Greyson is also a video artist, writer and activist; he is currently a professor at York University, where he teaches film and video theory and film production and editing. Greyson has been living together with Stephen Andrews, his boyfriend since 1996. Andrews is a fellow artist whose medium is contemporary photo-based conceptual art. They live in a working class Portuguese neighborhood in Toronto and have known each other since they were teenagers.

Collapse )

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Greyson

Collapse )

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4544339.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

James Purdy (July 17, 1914 – March 13, 2009)

James Otis Purdy (July 17, 1914 – March 13, 2009) was a controversial American novelist, short story-writer, poet, and playwright who, since his debut in 1956, published over a dozen novels, and several collections of poetry, short stories, and plays. His work has been translated into more than 30 languages. It has been praised by writers as diverse as Edward Albee, James M. Cain, Lillian Hellman, Francis King, Marianne Moore, Dorothy Parker, Dame Edith Sitwell (an important early advocate), Terry Southern, Gore Vidal (who described Purdy as "an authentic American genius") and A.N. Wilson. Purdy has been the recipient of the Morton Dauwen Zabel Fiction Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1993) and was nominated for the 1985 PEN/Faulkner Award for his novel On Glory's Course (1984). In addition, he won two Guggenheim Fellowships (1958 and 1962), and grants from the Ford Foundation (1961), and Rockefeller Foundation. He worked as an interpreter and lectured in Europe with the United States Information Agency. (Photo by Carl Van Vechten, 1957)

Purdy was born in Hicksville, Ohio in 1914. His family moved to Findlay, Ohio when he was about five years old where he graduated from Findlay High School in 1932. He was further educated at Bowling Green State College (now Bowling Green State University), the University of Chicago and the University of Puebla in Mexico.

From the start, his work had often been at the edge of what was printable: Gollancz could not bring himself to print the word "motherfucker" in the 1957 UK edition of 63: Dream Palace; decades later, the German government tried to ban Narrow Rooms, but a court threw the case out. Although many readers were scandalized, a solid cadre of distinguished critics and scholars embraced his work from the start, including John Cowper Powys, Dame Edith Sitwell, Dorothy Parker, Jane Bowles, Lillian Hellman and Susan Sontag, who warmly defended him against puritanical critics. Tennessee Williams was also an early admirer of Purdy's work.

Collapse )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Purdy
Purdy is one of the most underrated American writers. I believe he is one of the masters of 20th century literature and In a Shallow Grave is a gem, about a disaffected and disfigured war veteran and his love for a hired male caretaker and the fugitive who comes into both their lives is spiritual, carnal, and profound. And Purdy´s command of the language and his use of American colloquial speech is nothing short of poetry. --Rick R. Reed
I saw a film version of In a Shallow Grave years ago starring Michael Biehn (who I had a massive crush on) and Patrick Dempsey, and sought out the book it was based on. In doing so, I stumbled upon my favorite writer. Purdy, more than any other writer, echoes in my more serious work. This is surreal, Southern Gothic writing at its best. Moody, romantic, and eerie. The romance at the heart of the tale between a disfigured war vet and a hired hand is one of the most aching ever novelized, gay or straight. --Eric Arvin
Collapse )

Collapse )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/2588569.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.