April 8th, 2015

andrew potter

Evan Davis & Guillaume Baltz

Evan Harold Davis (born 8 April 1962) is a British economist, journalist and presenter for the BBC. In October 2001, Davis took over from Peter Jay as the BBC's economics editor. He left this post in April 2008 to become a presenter on BBC Radio 4's Today programme. Evan Davis is also the presenter for the BBC venture-capitalist programme Dragons' Den, as well as The Bottom Line, a business conversation show, also on BBC Radio 4. With a warm, slightly camp personality, and round facial features, Davis tends to come across as a teddy bear or, as co-host Jeremy Paxton put it, "Tigger." Co-workers have nicknamed him Tinsel Tits for his nipple rings, and rumor has it he's also pierced further down. Davis and his boyfriend, French landscape architect Guillaume Baltz, met in a bar and have shared a flat in Earls Court.

Davis grew up in Ashtead, Surrey. He attended Dorking County Grammar School, which in 1976 became The Ashcombe School, Dorking. He then gained a First in Philosophy, Politics and Economics at St John's College, Oxford from 1981 to 1984, before obtaining an MPA at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. While at Oxford University, Davis edited Cherwell, the student newspaper.

Davis began work as an economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, and while there he was briefly seconded to help officials work on early development of the Community Charge system of local government taxation (better known as the Poll Tax). In 1988 he moved to the London Business School, writing articles for their publication "Business Strategy Review". He returned to the Institute for Fiscal Studies in 1992, writing a paper on "Britain, Europe and the Square Mile" for the European Policy Forum which argued that British financial prosperity depended on being seen as a bridgehead to the European Union.

In 1993, Davis joined the BBC as an economics correspondent. He worked as economics editor on BBC Two's Newsnight programme from 1997 to 2001. In the mid-1990s he was a member of the Social Market Foundation's Advisory Council; he is a member of the British-American Project for a Successor Generation.


Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs; Evan Davies, BBC presenter; Guillaume Baltz and Amelia French of the BBC. by Science Museum London
Evan Davis (born 8 April 1962) is a British economist, journalist and presenter for the BBC. With a warm, slightly camp personality, and round facial features, Davis tends to come across as a teddy bear or, as co-host Jeremy Paxton put it, "Tigger." Co-workers have nicknamed him Tinsel Tits for his nipple rings, and rumor has it he's also pierced further down. Davis and his boyfriend, French landscape architect Guillaume Baltz, met in a bar and have shared a flat in Earls Court.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evan_Davis

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More LGBT Couples at my website: elisarolle.com, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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andrew potter

Eddie Aldridge & Fred Ebb

Fred Ebb (April 8, 1928 – September 11, 2004) was an American musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. The Kander and Ebb team frequently wrote for such performers as Liza Minnelli and Chita Rivera.

Ebb was born in Manhattan to a Jewish family, the son of Anna Evelyn (née Gritz) and Harry Ebb. He worked during the early 1950s bronzing baby shoes, as a trucker's assistant, and was also employed in a department store credit office and at a hosiery company. He graduated from New York University with a bachelor’s degree in English Literature, and also earned his Master’s Degree in English from Columbia University.

One of his early collaborators was Phil Springer, and a song they wrote together ("I Never Loved Him Anyhow") was recorded by Carmen McRae in 1956. Another song Ebb wrote with Springer was "Heartbroken" (1953), which was recorded by Judy Garland, the mother of his future protégée, Liza Minnelli. Other Springer-Ebb tunes include "Moonlight Gambler" and "Nevertheless I Never Lost the Blues". "Don't Forget", which he wrote with Norman Leyden, was recorded by singer Eddy Arnold in 1954.

On his first theatrical writing job, he co-wrote the lyrics for the musical revue Baker's Dozen in 1951. He wrote songs with Norman Martin for the revue Put It in Writing (1962). He also worked with composer Paul Klein from the early 1950s onward, contributing songs to the cabaret revue Isn't America Fun (1959) and the Broadway revue From A to Z (1960), directed by Christopher Hewett. With Klein, Ebb wrote his first book musical, Morning Sun. Originally, Bob Fosse was attached as director. Fosse eventually withdrew from the project, and the show was unsuccessful.


John Kander's first produced musical was A Family Affair, written with James and William Goldman. He met lyricist Fred Ebb in 1962 and began a songwriting collaboration that would last for more than four decades. Later that year rising star Barbra Streisand recorded the duo's songs, "My Coloring Book" and "I Don't Care Much." In 1965, Kander and Ebb landed their first show on Broadway, Flora the Red Menace, directed by George Abbott, in which Liza Minnelli made her initial Broadway appearance.


Edwin "Eddie" Aldridge & Fred Ebb are buried together in Plot: Section 20, Lot 43458 (private mausoleum along lake), Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York Along the manicured shores of Sylvan Water, where the mausoleums edge together like little clubhouses, Fred Ebb, the Broadway composer, is entombed alongside Edwin Aldridge, a stage manager, reportedly his lover, and a third man, Martin Cohen (1926 - 1995), all under the inscription together forever.


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Ebb

John Harold Kander (born March 18, 1927) is the American composer of a number of musicals as part of the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb. (Picture: John Kander and Fred Ebb)

Kander was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the son of Bernice (née Aaron) and Harold S. Kander. Kander attended The Pembroke Country-Day School and Oberlin College before earning a Master's degree at Columbia University where he was a protégé of Douglas Moore and studied composition with Jack Beeson.

Kander began his Broadway career as substitute rehearsal pianist for West Side Story. The stage manager for West Side Story then asked Kander to play the auditions for her next show, Gypsy. During the auditions, Kander met the choreographer, Jerome Robbins, who suggested that Kander compose the dance music for the show in 1959. After that experience, he wrote dance arrangements for Irma la Douce in 1960.

His first produced musical was A Family Affair, written with James and William Goldman. He met lyricist Fred Ebb in 1962 and began a songwriting collaboration that would last for more than four decades. Later that year rising star Barbra Streisand recorded two of the duo's songs, "My Coloring Book" and "I Don't Care Much." In 1965, Kander and Ebb landed their first show on Broadway, Flora the Red Menace, produced by Hal Prince, directed by George Abbott, and with book by George Abbott and Robert Russell, in which Liza Minnelli made her initial Broadway appearance. Kander and Ebb have since been associated with writing material for both Liza Minnelli and Chita Rivera, and have produced special material for their appearances live and on television.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Kander

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More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

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andrew potter

Gene Pruitt & Michael Bennett

Michael Bennett (April 8, 1943 – July 2, 1987) was an American musical theater director, writer, choreographer, and dancer. He won seven Tony Awards for his choreography and direction of Broadway shows and was nominated for an additional eleven. The charismatic Bennett was a lover of men and women; his two primary heterosexual relationships were stormy, first with wife Donna McKechnie (wed December 1976, divorced four months later) then with Sabine Cassel, whom he promised to wed but did not. His relationships with men were less publicized, but they included long relationships with dancers Larry Fuller, Scott Pearson, Richard Christopher, and Gene Pruitt, his last lover.

Bennett choreographed Promises, Promises, Follies and Company. In 1976, he won the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical and the Tony Award for Best Choreography for the Pulitzer Prize–winning phenomenon A Chorus Line. Bennett, under the aegis of producer Joseph Papp, created A Chorus Line based on a precedent-setting workshop process which he pioneered. He also directed and co-choreographed Dreamgirls with Michael Peters. (
Picture: Larry Fuller)

Bennett was born Michael Bennett DiFiglia in Buffalo, New York, the son of Helen (Ternoff), a secretary, and Salvatore Joseph DiFiglia, a factory worker. His father was Roman Catholic and his mother was Jewish. He studied dance and choreography in his teens and staged a number of shows in his local high school before dropping out to accept the role of Baby John in the US and European tours of West Side Story.


(back row, left to right) Ed Kleban, Marvin Hamlisch, (front row, left to right) James Kirkwood, Michael Bennet, Nicholas Dante)
Michael Bennett was an American musical theater director, writer, choreographer, and dancer. The charismatic Bennett was a lover of men and women; his two primary heterosexual relationships were stormy, first with wife Donna McKechnie then with Sabine Cassel, whom he promised to wed but did not. His relationships with men were less publicized, but they included long relationships with dancers Larry Fuller, Scott Pearson, Richard Christopher, and Gene Pruitt, his last lover.


AIDS Quilt

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Bennett
THE OTHER HOPEFUL DEVELOPMENT in the spring of 1986 was an announcement from the National Cancer Institute that a new drug called azidothymidine, or AZT, seemed to help some AIDS patients. Encouraging signs included "fewer fevers, the disappearance of infections, improved appetite and weight gain." In years to come the drug's effectiveness-and toxicity-would be fiercely debated within the gay community, but when AZT was first introduced, it was the only medical treatment that provided any optimism at all. Roy Cohn and the Broadway choreographer Michael Bennett were two of the first AIDS patients to be treated with it. --Charles Kaiser. The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America (Kindle Locations 4616-4620). Kindle Edition.
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