May 7th, 2015

andrew potter

John Hilton & William Campbell

Freedom to Marry (http://www.freedomtomarry.org/) released a video of New Yorkers William Campbell and John Hilton telling the story of their 54-year relationship, which began just before Hilton was drafted and sent to Europe in 1957.

Campbell wrote Hilton letters throughout his deployment, and when Hilton returned and began working and going to night school, Campbell did all the cooking and laundry.

"When I was getting ready to graduate and I got my degree I told Bill he will never, ever, as long as we live, do the laundry again, and that was in 1971," Hilton said.

"And so he has never, ever done the laundry since.”

After Campbell developed Parkinson's disease, Hilton described taking care of him as "payback time" for all Campbell had done for him.

Beloved and devoted partner since 1957, Bill passed away suddenly on May 7, 2011, less than two months before marriage equality was legalized in New York.

Bill was loved and admired by everyone who knew him.

He was born in Lone Mountain, Tennessee in 1926.


William Campbell and John Hilton's 54-year relationship began just before Hilton was drafted and sent to Europe in 1957. Campbell wrote Hilton letters throughout his deployment, and when Hilton returned and began working and going to night school, Campbell did all the cooking and laundry. "When I was getting ready to graduate and I got my degree I told Bill he will never, ever, as long as we live, do the laundry again, and that was in 1971," Hilton said. "And so he has never, ever done the laundry since.” Beloved and devoted partner since 1957, Bill passed away suddenly on May 7, 2011, less than two months before marriage equality was legalized in New York.

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

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andrew potter

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky & Vladimir Davydov

Peter Tchaikovsky’s music has always created a particular resonance among gay men, perhaps because many of them identify with the longing and angst expressed in his melodies. Tchaikovsky (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893) was inspired by his same-sex relationships, and he dedicated symphonies to his lovers. His brother and biographer Modest wrote that the emotional inspiration for Romeo and Juliet was the composer’s unrequited love for a school chum, Vladimir Gerard.

When he was a professor at the Moscow Conservatory, Tchaikovsky seduced fourteen-year-old Alexei Sofronov. They lived together from then on, with Sofronov acting as the composer’s valet. Some of Tchaikovsky’s other lovers included violinist Joseph Kotek and pianist Vasily Sapelnikov. Tchaikovsky’s diaries cryptically chronicle his struggles with his sexuality—and several successes. The entry for March 22, 1889 details an encounter with a black man in Paris.

The love of Tchaikovsky’s later life was his nephew Vladimir Davidov. After Tchaikovsky lost the support of Nadezhda von Meck in 1890, he made Davydov his confidant. Tchaikovsky considered relocating from Klin to Saint Petersburg in the last couple of years of his life so as to live closer to Davydov (a potential move that caused fellow composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov some distress) writing to his brother Modest, "Seeing the importance of Bob in my life is increasing all the time.... To see him, hear him and feel him close to me will soon become for me, it seems, the paramount condition for my happiness."


The love of Peter Tchaikovsky's life was his nephew Vladimir Davidov. After Tchaikovsky lost the support of Nadezhda von Meck in 1890, he made Davydov his confidant. Tchaikovsky considered relocating from Klin to Saint Petersburg in the last couple of years of his life so as to live closer to Davydov (a potential move that caused fellow composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov some distress) writing to his brother Modest, "Seeing the importance of Bob in my life is increasing all the time"

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Stern, Keith (2009-09-01). Queers in History: The Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Historical Gays, Lesbians and Bisexuals (Kindle Locations 11609-11626). Perseus Books Group. Kindle Edition.

Vladimir Davydov (December 14, 1871 – December 27, 1906) was the second son of Lev and Alexandra Davidov and nephew, as well as lover, of the composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, who called him "Bob".

From his earliest years, Davydov showed an aptitude for music and drawing, which was encouraged by his uncle. After he studied at the Imperial School of Jurisprudence in Saint Petersburg, however, Bob decided on a military career and joined the Preobrazhensky Lifeguard regiment. He resigned his commission as a lieutenant in 1897 and moved to Klin, where he helped the composer's brother Modest create a museum to commemorate Tchaikovsky's life. Prone to depression, Davydov turned to morphine and other drugs before he committed suicide in 1906 at the age of 34. He is buried at the town's Dem'ianovo Cemetery.

After Tchaikovsky lost the support of Nadezhda von Meck in 1890, he made Davydov his confidant. Tchaikovsky considered relocating from Klin to Saint Petersburg in the last few years of his life so as to live closer to Davydov (a potential move that caused fellow composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov some distress) writing to his brother Modest, "Seeing the importance of Bob in my life is increasing all the time.... To see him, hear him and feel him close to me will soon become for me, it seems, the paramount condition for my happiness." Davydov was one of the party that remained with Tchaikovsky through his final illness. Tchaikovsky named Davydov in his will as the inheritor of the royalties and copyrights to his musical works.

Tchaikovsky dedicated his Sixth Symphony, the Pathétique, to Davydov, as well as his Children's Album of piano works, Op. 34.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Davydov

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

John Gielgud & John Perry

Hugh "Binkie" Beaumont (27 March 1908 – 22 March 1973) was a British theatre manager and producer, sometimes referred to as the "éminence grise" of the West End Theatre. Though he shunned the spotlight so that his name was not known widely among the general public, he was one of the most successful and influential manager-producers in the West End during the middle of the 20th century. John Gielgud was a strong influence on Beaumont's aesthetic development, and they maintained a mutually beneficial association which survived despite a personal crisis when Gielgud's then partner John Perry fell for and moved in with Beaumont. Perry remained personally and professionally involved with Beaumont for the rest of the latter's life, and all three remained on close terms. 

Beaumont was brought up in Cardiff, where he joined the staff of a local theatre at the age of fifteen. From there he built a career in theatrical management. His company, H. M. Tennent, which he co-founded in 1936, was based at the old Globe Theatre (now the Gielgud Theatre) in Shaftesbury Avenue, London. His success was based on lavish productions, starry casts and plays calculated to appeal to a West End audience. Among those with whom he was closely associated were Noël Coward and John Gielgud. His successes included new plays, revivals of classics, and musicals.

With the rise of state-subsidised theatre and avant garde plays from the mid-1950s onwards, Beaumont's genre of opulent productions of safe repertoire started to seem conventional. He recognised this by serving on the board of the new National Theatre during the last decade of his life.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binkie_Beaumont

Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000) was an English actor, director, and producer. A descendant of the renowned Terry acting family, he achieved early international acclaim for his youthful, emotionally expressive Hamlet which broke box office records on Broadway in 1937. He was known for his beautiful speaking of verse and particularly for his warm and expressive voice, which his colleague Sir Alec Guinness likened to "a silver trumpet muffled in silk". Gielgud is one of the few entertainers who have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award. Longtime partner Martin Hensler died in December 1998, 16 months before Gielgud's own death in 2000. He publicly acknowledged Hensler as his lover only in 1988, in the programme notes for The Best of Friends, which was his final stage performance.

John Gielgud was born in South Kensington in London to Kate Terry and Frank Gielgud. He was of theatrical lineage on his mother's side, being the grandson of actress Kate Terry, whose actor-siblings included Ellen Terry, Marion Terry and Fred Terry.

Gielgud's Catholic father, Franciszek Giełgud, born in 1880, was a descendant of a Polish noble family residing at a manor in a town called Giełgudyszki (now Gelgaudiškis in Marijampolė County, Lithuania). In his autobiography, Gielgud states repeatedly and clearly that his father was Polish Catholic, and mentions Gelgaudiškis as being his ancestral home whence his family and their surname originated.


Sir John Gielgud was an English actor, director, and producer. For Gielgud, true love arrives with a Hungarian, Martin Hensler, and Gielgud's letters of the time become saturated with a new, blissful sense of mutual dependence. Hensler was a chef, secretary, gardener, and was long-term lover of Gielgud from 1974. Gielgud bought his house in Wotton Underwood in Buckinghamshire and lived there with Hensler, for over 25 years, until Martin's death in 1998, even if their relationship began in 1962, when Gielgud picked up Martin, a designer exiled from Hungary, at an art exhibition.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gielgud

Arthur John Perry (born Woodruff, Co Tipperary 7 May 1906; died Cambridge 16 February 1995), actor, playwright, theatrical agent, was one of the last surviving members of H.M. Tennent Ltd - "the Firm", as it was known - which under the management of Hugh "Binkie" Beaumont dominated the West End and provincial theatres for more than 30 years. Founded in 1936, it flourished during the Second World War, and in the course of its existence produced over 400 plays, musicals, intimate revues and revivals of the classics. The name came to symbolise excellence of style, presentation and casting, setting standards which were the envy and admiration of its competitors on both sides of the Atlantic. 

Perry's association with Beaumont began in 1938 when John Gielgud approached him and offered to direct a play Perry had written in collaboration with Molly Keane (under her pen-name M.J. Farrell), Perry's childhood friend and neighbour. Full of Irish wit and eccentric characters, the play, Spring Meeting (Ambassadors, 1938), provided Margaret Rutherford with a starring role and established her as a favourite with audiences and critics alike, a position she occupied with the Firm for the rest of her theatrical career. Simultaneously Gielgud agreed to make his first appearance for the Firm in Dodie Smith's Dear Octopus (Queen's, 1938) and apart from seasons at the Old Vic and Stratford-upon-Avon, remained as its brightest star for the next two decades. Gielgud subsequently staged two more of Perry's collaborations with Keane: Treasure Hunt (Apollo, 1949), an amusing vehicle for Sybil Thorndike, and Dazzling Prospect (Strand, 1961), which provided another comic role for Margaret Rutherford.

Perry was born at Woodruff, Co Tipperary, in 1906, and educated at Cheltenham College. He made his professional acting dbut as Jack Chesney in Charlie's Aunt in 1928, joined the Florence Glossop-Harris company for a tour of Canada and the West Indies and then left the stage to concentrate on writing. Among his other plays and adaptations were Kate O'Brien's The Last of Summer (Phoenix, 1944), Francis Brett Young's A Man About the House (Piccadilly, 1945) and Elizabeth Bowen's Castle Anna (Lyric Hammersmith, 1948). Although he never took his acting seriously, Perry found his career cut short by the Second World War and he served in the RAF for the next five years. In 1943, with support from Anthony Quayle, he was appointed ADC to the Governor of Gibraltar, which prompted Beaumont to organise a visit to the Rock by an all-star concert party which included Gielgud, Vivien Leigh, Elisabeth Welch and Michael Wilding. When his service career ended, Perry joined Beaumont at the Globe Theatre and eventually became a director of H.M. Tennent. Tall, fair-haired and elegant, at home in Ireland Perry was the typical gentleman, riding to hounds (he was joint master of his local pack, near Clonmel) and a keen gardener.

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Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituary--john-perry-1609773.html

Martin Hensler (1944 - December 1998) was a chef, secretary, gardner, and was long-term lover of Sir John Gielgud from 1974. Sir John bought his house in Buckinghamshire and lived there with Martin Hensler, for over 25 years, even if their relationship has begun in 1962. (Picture: Actors in Plague over England, the acclaimed West End play about John Gielgud)

Gielgud's Letters, 800-plus missives, written between 1912 and 1999, are with his mother, his onetime lover Paul Anstee, the actress Irene Worth, photographer and designer Cecil Beaton and the playwright Hugh Wheeler. The early part of the volume is dominated by correspondence to his mother (the only family member who figures prominently), and is full of excited career talk as he achieves success. Then comes the romance with Anstee — tarnished by Anstee's jealousy and Gielgud's insistence that "I can't really share my life completely with anybody." Finally, true love arrives with a Hungarian, Martin Hensler, and Gielgud's letters become saturated with a new, blissful sense of mutual dependence.

When Gielgud died at the age of 96, he was lauded as the last of the great theatre-knights: an actor and director whose work enriched the 20th century. But his friends, lovers and contemporaries also knew him as an eloquent writer. His letters range in tone from the mischievous and outré to the fearful and desperate - when he is threatened by a blackmailer.

Such was his fear of exposure that it was only towards the end of his life that he publicly acknowledged his debt to Martin Hensler.

In 1959 Paul Anstee supported Gielgud through a blackmail attempt made on him in New York, reminiscent of the cottaging incident in London in 1953 when Gielgud was arrested for approaching a man in a public lavatory who turned out to be an undercover policeman. But Gielgud continued to demand independence and, in October 1962, picked up a young Hungarian, Martin Hensler, at an art exhibition.

Paul Anstee (December 30, 1928 - August 26, 2010) was one of three great loves in Sir John Gielgud's life, the first being John Perry, who worked for and later lived with "Binkie" Beaumont at HM Tennent impresarios, and the last a possessive Hungarian, Martin Hensler.

Anstee was born Henry Miskin on December 30 1928, the son of Lieutenant-Colonel Christopher Harold Miskin, OBE, MC and Bar, of the Bedfordshire Regiment, from a well-known family of builders in St Albans.

Henry was educated at Bryanston and then trained at Rada before changing his name to Paul Anstee and going into repertory. A tall, languid figure with a pronounced coiffe, he later moved into theatre design, working closely with Cecil Beaton for seven years. In 1953 Beaton was amused to notice him spraying hydrangeas blue before the Queen attended a Coronation command performance of Aren't We All? The originals had faded under the television camera lights.

In the same year Anstee had a part in A Woman of No Importance alongside Isobel Jeans and Athene Seyler. He designed Time Remembered in 1954; Nude with Violin (for Noël Coward, thanks to John Gielgud, who starred) in 1956; Suddenly It's Spring, starring Margaret Lockwood in 1959; and The Collection in 1962.

During his relationship with Gielgud, which flourished for several years from 1953, he opened an interior decorating and antiques shop in the King's Road, partly financed by his father and briefly by the actress Adrianne Allen, wife of Raymond Massey. The shop opened in October 1955, giving him pleasure and hard work in equal measure. In September 1961 he opened a design shop in Cale Street, with favourable publicity, retaining for a few further years the King's Road shop solely for antiques.


Vivien Leigh entertains over lunch at Tickerage Mill. Seated from L-R: Actor and interior designer Paul Anstee, Sir Kenneth Clark, Vivien, John Gielgud, journalist Alan Dent, and Lady Jane Clark (http://www.vivandlarry.com/vivien-leigh/vivien-leigh-through-jack-merivales-lens/)
During his relationship with Gielgud, which flourished for several years from 1953, Paul Anstee opened an interior decorating and antiques shop in the King's Road, partly financed by his father and briefly by the actress Adrianne Allen, wife of Raymond Massey. The shop opened in 1955, giving him pleasure and hard work in equal measure. In September 1961 he opened a design shop in Cale Street, with favourable publicity, retaining for a few further years the King's Road shop solely for antiques.


Paul Anstee's country home, Templewood, near Heathfield in Sussex
In the early 1970s Paul Anstee found happiness with a young Canadian called Guy Gauvreau. In London they lived at Chelsea Studios, weekending at Anstee's country home, Templewood, near Heathfield in Sussex. Their garden was badly damaged in the 1987 storm. Gauvreau died of leukaemia in December 1989, aged 41. In his later years Paul Anstee suffered from Alzheimer's disease, spending his last two years at Dudwell St Mary Nursing Home, Burwash, where he died on August 26, 2010.

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Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/culture-obituaries/theatre-obituaries/8047032/Paul-Anstee.html

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Doric Wilson (February 24, 1939 – May 7, 2011)

Doric Wilson (February 24, 1939 – May 7, 2011) was an American playwright, director, producer, critic and gay rights activist.

He was born Alan Doric Wilson in Los Angeles, California, where his family was temporarily located. Originally from the Pacific Northwest, he was raised on his grandfather's ranch at Plymouth, Washington on the Columbia River. He wrote his first play at Kennewick High School, but was accused of plagiarism when a teacher informed him that no student of hers would ever be able to write such a play.

Wilson received his early theater training under Lorraine Larson, apprenticed with Dorothy Seeburger and the Richland Players, and studied briefly at the Drama Department of the University of Washington until he was forced to leave after he initiated a one person protest against anti-gay sniper attacks at a nearby park.

Wilson moved to NYC in 1959 where he had a brief acting career playing such roles as Valère to the Mariane of Dawn Wells (later Mary Ann on Gilligan's Island) in Molière's Tartuffe and Older Patrick to Nancy Wilder's Auntie Mame in various stock productions. In 1961, he became one of the first resident playwrights at NYC's legendary Caffe Cino, his comedy, And He Made a Her, opened there with Jane Lowry and Larry Neil Clayton leading the cast and Paxton Whitehead directing.

The success of his four plays at Caffe Cino helped, in the words of playwright Robert Patrick, "establish the Cino as a venue for new plays, and materially contributed to the then-emerging concept of Off-Off-Broadway." His Now She Dances!, a fantasia on the trial of Oscar Wilde, was the first Off-Off-Broadway play to deal positively with gay people (1961).

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doric_Wilson

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices


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andrew potter

Phil Zwickler (June 1, 1954 - May 7, 1991)

Phil Zwickler was a filmmaker and writer about gay and lesbian issues and the AIDS crisis, born June 1, 1954 and died from the complications of AIDS on May 7, 1991.

With Jane Lippman, he produced and directed "Rights and Reactions: Lesbian and Gay Rights on Trial," an award-winning documentary covering the 1986 New York City Council hearings on the gay rights bill.

Zwickler collaborated with David Wojnarowicz to produce "Fear of Disclosure," a short film about the issues gay men face dating in the context of AIDS.

Zwickler also worked with experimental German film maker, Rosa von Praunheim, to produce "Silence Equals Death" and "Positive," both exploring the emotions and anger of people with AIDS. The film "Positive" includes interviews with Zwickler and two other men who were HIV-positive.

He produced his final project, "The Needle Nightmares" (1991), with the help of David Meieran.

Zwickler also worked as a news reporter, publishing stories in the Village Voice and serving as editor of the People with AIDS Coalition Newsline for a number of years.

Before working in film and journalism, he taught literature in New York City public schools and community colleges.

The photographs, documents, and videos in the Phil Zwickler Collection at Cornell college allow researchers to look 'behind-the-scenes' at how political documentaries are made and brought to the public, at what motivated Phil Zwickler in the creation of his art, and at personal perspectives on AIDS issues, LBGT rights, and civil rights in general.

Source: http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/EAD/htmldocs/RMM07564.html

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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andrew potter

Cover Reveal: Running With The Wind by Shira Anthony


Running With the Wind (Series: Mermen of Ea 3) by Shira Anthony
eBook: http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6455
Paperback: http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6456

Sequel to Into the Wind

With the final confrontation between the island and mainland Ea factions looming, Taren and Ian sail with Odhrán to investigate a lost colony of merfolk in the Eastern Lands. Upon their arrival, the King of Astenya welcomes them as friends. Odhrán, however, isn’t so quick to trust the descendent of the man who held him prisoner for nearly a decade, especially now that he has someone to cherish and protect—the mysterious winged boy he rescued from the depths.

Armed with the knowledge he believes will save the Ea, Taren returns to the mainland. With Ian at his side, Taren convinces Vurin that their people must unite with their island brethren before it’s too late. When Seria and his men attack, Taren must call upon the ancient power of the rune stone to protect his comrades. But using stone’s immeasurable power commands a hefty price—and Ian fears that price is Taren’s life.



About the author: In her last incarnation, Shira was a professional opera singer, performing roles in such operas as “Tosca,” “i Pagliacci,” and “La Traviata,” among others. She’s given up TV for evenings spent with her laptop, and she never goes anywhere without a pile of unread M/M romance on her Kindle.
Shira is married with two children and two insane dogs, and when she’s not writing she is usually in a courtroom trying to make the world safer for children. When she’s not working, she can be found aboard a 36’ catamaran at the Carolina coast with her favorite sexy captain at the wheel.

Where to find the author:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shira.anthony
Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shira-Anthony/177484618974406
Twitter: https://twitter.com/WriterShira
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/anthony0564/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4641776.Shira_Anthony
Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ShiraAnthony/posts
Goodreads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/24027250-running-with-the-wind



Tour Dates & Stops: May 7, 2015
Parker Williams, Rainbow Gold Reviews, Cate Ashwood, Carly’s Book Reviews, Andrew Q. Gordon, The Hat Party, MM Good Book Reviews, Rebecca Cohen Writes, Havan Fellows, Kristy's Brain Food, Elisa - My Reviews and Ramblings, BFD Book Blog, Book Reviews, Rants, and Raves, Wicked Faerie's Tales and Reviews, Inked Rainbow Reads, Chris McHart, Scattered Thoughts & Rogue Words, Bayou Book Junkie, Molly Lolly, Emotion in Motion, Kimi-Chan, Charley Descoteaux





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andrew potter

2015 Next Generation Indie Book Awards

Days of Love has been named a Finalist in the GLBT category of the 2015 Next Generation Indie Book Awards. This achievement will be published at www.IndieBookAwards.com along with the other Finalists and Winners in the next few weeks. At the bottom of this email is a complete list of the 2015 Winner and Finalists (in alphabetical order) in this category.

GLBT (GAY/LESBIAN/BISEXUAL/TRANSGENDER)
WINNER:
The Invisible Orientation: An Introduction to Asexuality, by Julie Sondra Decker (Skyhorse Publishing/Carrel Books) (ISBN 978-1631440021)
FINALISTS:
A Boy Like Me, by Jennie Wood (Publisher: 215 Ink) (ISBN 978-0692238066)
A Song For Lost Angels: How Daddy and Papa Fought to Save Their Family, by Kevin Fisher-Paulson (Fearless Books) (ISBN 978-0988802421)
Days of Love, by Elisa Rolle (CreateSpace) (ISBN 978-1500563325)
Secrets in Small Towns, by Iza Moreau (Black Bay Books) (ISBN 978-1492177104)
The Guestbook at Asilomar, by RJ Stastny (iUniverse) (ISBN 9781491742624)


Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

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