July 20th, 2015

andrew potter

Alexander the Great & Hephaestion

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great, was a king of Macedon, a state in northern ancient Greece. Born in Pella in 356 BC, Alexander was tutored by Aristotle until the age of 16. By the age of thirty, he had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world, stretching from the Ionian Sea to the Himalayas. He was undefeated in battle and is considered one of history's most successful commanders. Hephaestion (c. 356 BC – 324 BC), son of Amyntor, was a Macedonian nobleman and a general in the army of Alexander the Great. He was "... by far the dearest of all the king's friends; he had been brought up with Alexander and shared all his secrets."

Alexander conquered most of the known world. He also conquered the young eunuchs Bagoas and Medius. Alexander’s relationships with his youthful aides would not have seemed unusual in ancient Greece, particularly among soldiers. In his Lives, Plutarch recounts an episode (also mentioned by Athenaios and Dicaearchus) during festivities when Alexander’s army was returning from India: "Bagoas sat down close by him, which so pleased the Macedonians, that they made loud acclarnations for him to kiss Bagoas, and never stopped clapping their hands and shouting till Alexander put his arms round him and kissed him." (Picture: Hephaestion)

Alexander’s most intimate relationship was with his cavalry commander, Hephaestion. They made sacrifices together at shrines in Troy, identifying their own love with that of the mythical Achilles and Patroclus. Alexander was devastated by Hephaestion’s death and soothed his grief with an elaborate and extremely expensive funeral.


Alexander the Great was king of Macedon, a state in northern ancient Greece. Hephaestion, son of Amyntor, was a Macedonian nobleman and a general in the army of Alexander the Great. He had been brought up with Alexander and shared all his secrets. They made sacrifices together at shrines in Troy, identifying their own love with that of the mythical Achilles and Patroclus. Alexander was devastated by Hephaestion death and soothed his grief with an elaborate and extremely expensive funeral.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_the_Great

Further Readings:

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

John Seton & Nicholas Morton

On the wall of the Venerable English College (the seminary for England and Wales) chapel in Rome, close to the altar, is a memorial to "the Reverend Nicholas Morton (died after 1586), priest, Englishman and celebrated doctor of sacred theology". The inscription proclaims that it was "his wish to be buried in the same tomb with the Reverend John Seton (c.1498 - July 20, 1567) with whom he fled from England for the same cause, that of religion, and who came to Rome at the same time". The two priests died twenty years apart, but Morton's love and determination on joint burial had survived the interval.

John Seton D.D. (c.1498–1567) was an English Roman Catholic priest, known as the author of a standard logic text.

Born in or about 1498, Seton was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. in 1528. Soon afterwards he was elected a fellow of St. John's, and graduated M.A. in 1532, B.D. in 1541.

Seton taught philosophy in his college, and gained a reputation as a tutor. He belonged to the "conservative humanist" group associated to St John's, a college sharply divided by the Protestant Reformation, with others of similar views including John Christopherson and Thomas Watson. He was also a good friend, however, of Roger Ascham who was one of the reformers there.

After being ordained priest, Seton became one of Bishop John Fisher's chaplains, and attended him the Tower of London. In 1542 he was one of the fellows of St John's who signed an appeal to the Visitor against John Taylor, the Master. In 1544 he proceeded D.D., and about that time was appointed one of the chaplains to Stephen Gardiner, at that time bishop of Winchester and chancellor of the university, who collated him to the rectory of Hinton, Hampshire; at Gardiner's trial in 1551 Seton gave testimony in his favour.


On the wall of the Venerable English College chapel in Rome, close to the altar, is a memorial to "the Reverend Nicholas Morton, priest, Englishman and celebrated doctor of sacred theology". The inscription proclaims that it was "his wish to be buried in the same tomb with the Reverend John Seton with whom he fled from England for the same cause, that of religion, and who came to Rome at the same time". The two priests died twenty years apart, but Morton's love and determination on joint burial had survived the interval.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Seton_%28priest%29

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andrew potter

GRL: Cody Kennedy

Starting from June 1, 2015, I will daily feature authors attending the three conventions I will join, Euro Pride in Munich (July), UK Meet in Bristol (September) and GRL in San Diego (October).

For the GRL in San Diego, October 15-18, 2015, today author is Cody Kennedy: Raised on the mean streets and back lots of Hollywood by a Yoda-look-alike grandfather, Cody doesn’t conform, doesn’t fit in, is epic awkward, and lives to perfect a deep-seated oppositional defiance disorder. In a constant state of fascination with the trivial, Cody contemplates such weighty questions as: If time and space are curved, then where do all the straight people come from? When not writing, Cody can be found taming waves on western shores, pondering the nutritional value of sunsets, appreciating the much maligned dandelion, unhooking guide ropes from stanchions, and marveling at all things ordinary. Visit my blog with comments, questions, or simply share what’s on your mind.

Further Readings:

Slaying Isidore's Dragons by C. Kennedy
Paperback: 350 pages
Publisher: Harmony Ink Press (April 9, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1634760018
ISBN-13: 978-1634760010
Amazon: Slaying Isidore's Dragons
Amazon Kindle: Slaying Isidore's Dragons

Follow the burgeoning love of two teens during the worst year of their lives. Irish-born Declan David de Quirke II is the son of two ambassadors, one Irish and one American. He is 'out' to his parents but to no one else. French-born Jean Isidore de Sauveterre is also the son of two ambassadors, one Catalan and one Parisian. His four half brothers have been told to cure him of his homosexuality. Both teens have lost a parent in a London car bombing.

Declan and Isidore meet at the beginning of their senior year at a private academy in the United States. Declan is immediately smitten with Isidore and becomes his knight in shining armor. Isidore wants to keep what is left of his sanity and needs Declan's love to do it. One is beaten, one is drugged, one is nearly raped, one has been raped. They are harassed by professors and police, and have fights at school, but none of it compares to running for their lives. When the headmaster's popular son attempts suicide and someone tries to assassinate Declan's mother, they are thrown headlong into chaos, betrayal, conspiracy, allegations of sexual coercion, even murder. And one of them carries a secret that may get them killed.



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