August 6th, 2015

andrew potter

Antony Peattie & Howard Hodgkin

Sir Gordon Howard Eliot Hodgkin CH, CBE (born 6 August 1932) is a British painter and printmaker. His work is most often associated with abstraction. When he was in his forties he spent some time in India and later fell ill with amoebiasis. After a major operation he went through a period of depression. Soon afterward he realized that he was gay and left his wife. For a time his love life became public as he seemed to fall for several unsuitable men. In 1983 he settled down with the music writer Antony Peattie.

Hodgkin was brought up in Hammersmith, west London. His father worked for Imperial Chemical Industries and his mother came from a Lancashire family of lawyers. His great-great-grandfather, Thomas Hodgkin, discovered the glandular disease later called Hodgkin’s Disease. His cousin Dorothy Hodgkin was a crystallographer and Nobel Prize winner. The artist and art critic Roger Fry was also a cousin, and Howard Hodgkin grew up in a home full of Omega Workshop objects produced by members of the Bloomsbury Group.

Prior to the outbreak of World War II, Hodgkin was evacuated to New York and stayed in a former governor’s residence on Long Island. Friends of his mother took him on his first visit to an art gallery, the Museum of Modern Art.

After the war, a rich relative paid for him to go to Eton, where his art teacher was Wilfred Blunt, the brother of the art critic and spy Anthony BLUNT.


Antony Peattie and Howard Hodgkin, David Hockney, 2002. © David Hockney
Sir Howard Hodgkin (born 6 August 1932) is a British painter and printmaker. His work is most often associated with abstraction. When he was in his forties he spent some time in India and later fell ill with amoebiasis. After a major operation he went through a period of depression. Soon afterward he realized that he was gay and left his wife. For a time his love life became public as he seemed to fall for several unsuitable men. In 1983 he settled down with the music writer Antony Peattie.


Red Bermudas 1978–80, The Museum of Modern Art, New York


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard_Hodgkin

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More Artists at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art

More Real Life Romances at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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andrew potter

Barnaby Miln, Derek Pattinson & John MacKay

Barnaby Miln (born 6 August 1947) is a social activist and former British magistrate. He is best known as the originator of the AIDS Awareness ribbon, World AIDS day, and for promoting Fairtrade fortnight and the Jubilee 2000 human chain around the G8 leaders. He was the first lay person to come out as gay in the General Synod of the Church of England and thereby the most public gay magistrate in England and Wales. Throughout his five years on General Synod he worked with the Reverend Richard Kirker, an openly gay clergyman who had been refused priesthood by Dr Robert Runcie and who had, with others, set up the Gay Christian Movement. later the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement, and became its general secretary.

In 1986 he met Derek Pattinson, secretary-general of the General Synod of the Church of England, who was to become his partner. Derek Pattinson was knighted in 2000 and ordained in 2001, becoming the Reverend Sir Derek Pattinson. Pattinson died in 2006 when The Times newspaper reported in its obituary that he was survived by Barnaby Miln. Miln was the chief mourner at the Westminster Abbey burial.

His current partner is John MacKay with whom he founded the Ocheye MacKay Limited consulting company in Aberdeen.

He is head of the Miln family which originates in Barry, a village near Carnoustie in Angus in Scotland and whose genealogy back to 1614 is recorded in Burke's Landed Gentry. His coat of arms was granted and matriculated at the Court of the Lord Lyon King of Arms on 8 August 1967, and re-matriculated on 12 October 1998, after his father’s death.


Barnaby Miln is a social activist and former British magistrate. He is the originator of the World AIDS day. In 1986 he met Derek Pattinson, secretary-general of the General Synod of the Church of England, who was to become his partner. Derek Pattinson was knighted in 2000 and ordained in 2001, becoming the Reverend Sir Derek Pattinson. Pattinson died in 2006. The Times reported in its obituary that he was survived by Barnaby Miln. Miln was the chief mourner at the Westminster Abbey burial.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnaby_Miln

Sir William Derek Pattinson (31 March 1930 – 10 October 2006) was Secretary-General of the General Synod of the Church of England from 1972 until 1990.

On 30 November 1992 Barnaby Miln - a homosexual activist, Justice of the Peace, and former member of the House of Laity of the General Synod of the Church of England - was asked to afternoon tea with Bishop of London who asked about Sir Derek’s drinking problem following reports he had received. They agreed, that for the sake of Barnaby Miln's well being, he and Sir Derek should no longer live together. The bishop thanked Barnaby Miln for looking after Sir Derek and assisted him in finding alternative accommodation. The bishop arranged that Barnaby Miln take Sir Derek, on 1 December 1992, to a consultant in Harley Street in the expectation that he would be sent to a clinic for specialist treatment. The consultant failed to persuade Sir Derek who, the following day, attended a local clergy chapter at Westminster Abbey which happened to be attended by the bishop. Seeing the state he was in, on 3 December 1992 the bishop wrote to Sir Derek suspending his license for an initial period of six weeks.

On 4 December 1992, The Independent claimed that Sir Derek had been living with Barnaby Miln.

Barnaby Miln returned in September 2000 to live with and care for Sir Derek whose health had deteriorated. In the last edition of Who's Who published before Sir Derek's death Barnaby Miln was named as his partner, and was the executor of his estate.

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Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derek_Pattinson


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More Real Life Romances at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

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andrew potter

Georgette Leblanc & Margaret Anderson

Park Benjamin (1849–1922) was an American patent lawyer, physician, and writer. He was born in New York City, graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1867, resigned from the Navy in 1869, and graduated at the Albany Law School in the following year. He was associate editor of The Scientific American from 1872 to 1878 and subsequently edited Appleton's Cyclopedia of Applied Mechanics and Cyclopædia of Modern Mechanism. (P: Dorothy and Gloria Courtesy of The Enrico Caruso Museum)

Towards the end of the war, Enrico Caruso met and wooed a 25-year-old socialite, Dorothy Park Benjamin (1893–1955). She was the daughter of a wealthy New York patent lawyer. In spite of the disapproval of Dorothy's father, the couple wed on August 20, 1918. They had a daughter, Gloria Caruso (1919–1999). Dorothy lived until 1955 and wrote two books about Caruso, published in 1928 and 1945. The books include many of Caruso's letters to his wife.

In 1918, Benjamin's daughter Dorothy, 25, eloped with opera star Enrico Caruso, who was 45. Caruso was the most famous tenor in the world at the time. Benjamin initially approved of the marriage but later withdrew his consent citing the differences in their "ages, nationality and temperament." Another of his daughters married that year and Benjamin was also conspicuously absent from her wedding.

In 1919, Benjamin legally adopted Dorothy's long time governess, Anna M. Bolchi, as his daughter. His wife was ill and living in a sanitarium at the time. Caruso died in 1921 at the age of 48 and Benjamin died the next year at the age of 74 at his summer home in Stamford, CT. All of his children, except Dorothy, were at his bedside when he died.


The daughter of well to do patent lawyer Park Benjaminin of New York, Dorothy was 25 when she married Italian tenor Enrico in 1918. The couple had been married just shy of 3 years when Enrico died at the age of 48. Dorothy would marry two more times. By 1942, the relationship of Margaret Anderson with Jane Heap had cooled, and, evacuating from the war in France, Anderson sailed for the United States. During the voyage, Anderson met Dorothy Caruso. The two began a romantic relationship, and lived together until Caruso's death in 1955.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrico_Caruso

Georgette Leblanc (8 February 1869 Rouen, – 27 October 1941 Le Cannet, near Cannes) was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. She became particularly associated with the works of Jules Massenet and was an admired interpreter of the title role in Bizet's Carmen. For many years Leblanc was the lover of Belgian playwright and writer Maurice Maeterlinck, and he wrote several parts for her within his stage plays. She portrayed the role of Ariane in Ariane et Barbe-bleue, both in the original 1899 stage play by Maeterlinck and in the 1907 opera adaptation by Paul Dukas. Leblanc also appeared in a couple of French films, most notably L'Inhumaine in 1924. In the last few decades of her life she turned to writing, producing two commercially successful autobiographies and several children's books and travelogues. (P: George Grantham Bain collection, purchased by the Library of Congress in 1948. Georgette Leblanc, French soprano and author,

After her relationship with Maeterlinck ended, Leblanc remained active on the stage within his plays throughout the 1920s, although her singing career was pretty much over. She had a number of romantic relationships with high profile individuals during the 1920s and 1930s. For a brief time she was involved with Greco-Armenian mystic G. I. Gurdjieff. She was also a close friend of fellow Gurdjieff student Margaret Anderson and some scholars speculate the two may have been lovers during the last fifteen years of Leblanc's life. She continued to be popular among the Parisian artistic social circles and was notably friends with Jean Cocteau and Marcel L'Herbier, in whose film L'Inhumaine (1924) she starred.


The Elizabeth Jenks Clark Collection of Margaret Anderson, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Margaret Anderson, Louise Davidson, and Mme. Georgette LeBlanc aboard the "Ile de France"
Margaret Anderson was the American publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review. Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author. Leblanc was also the lover of Belgian playwright and writer Maurice Maeterlinck. She was also a close friend of fellow Gurdjieff student Anderson and some scholars speculate the two may have been lovers during the last 15 years of Leblanc's life. Anderson is buried beside Georgette Leblanc in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery.



Georgette Leblanc & Margaret Anderson are buried together in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery. Margaret died in 1973 and is buried beside Georgette.


The Elizabeth Jenks Clark Collection of Margaret Anderson, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Georgette LeBlanc posed with a piano

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgette_Leblanc

Jane Heap (1883 – 1964) was an American publisher and a significant figure in the development and promotion of literary modernism. Together with Margaret Anderson, her friend and business partner (who for some years was also her lover), she edited the celebrated literary magazine The Little Review, which published an extraordinary collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929. Heap herself has been called "one of the most neglected contributors to the transmission of modernism between America and Europe during the early twentieth century." (P: Little Review reunion, with Jane Heap, Mina Loy, and Ezra Pound in Paris (1921))

Heap was born in Topeka, Kansas, where her father was the warden of the local mental asylum. After completing her high school education, she moved to Chicago, where she enrolled in the Art Institute of Chicago, and continued to take night school classes there even after she became an art teacher at the Lewis Institute.

It was while working at the Lewis Institute, in 1908, that she first met Florence Reynolds, a student and the daughter of a prosperous Chicago businessman. Reynolds and Heap became lovers, in 1910 travelling together to Germany, where Heap studied tapestry weaving. The two women remained friends throughout their lives, although they often lived apart, and despite the fact that Heap formed romantic attachments with many other women. From the late 1930s, Heap became the companion of the founding editor of British Vogue and head designer at Worth London Elspeth Champcommunal.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Heap

Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973) was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review, which published a collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929. The periodical is most noted for introducing many prominent American and British writers of the 20th century, such as Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot in the United States, and publishing the first thirteen chapters of James Joyce's then-unpublished novel, Ulysses. (P: New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection, Library of Congress. Margaret Anderson, American writer and magazine editor,

A large collection of her papers on Gurdjieff's teaching is now preserved at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

Anderson was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, the eldest of three daughters of Arthur Aubrey Anderson and Jessie (Shortridge) Anderson. She graduated from high school in Anderson, Indiana, in 1903, and then entered a two-year junior preparatory class at Western College for Women in Oxford, Ohio.

She left Western in 1906, at the end of her freshman year, to pursue a career as a pianist. In the fall of 1908 she left home for Chicago, where she reviewed books for a religious weekly (The Continent) before joining The Dial. By 1913 she was a book critic for the Chicago Evening Post.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Caroline_Anderson

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Guthrie McClintic & Katharine Cornell

Guthrie McClintic (August 6, 1893 - October 29, 1961) was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York.

McClintic was born in Seattle and attended Washington University and New York's American Academy of Dramatic Arts and became an actor but soon became a stage manager and casting director for major Broadway producer Winthrop Ames. His Broadway directorial debut was on A. A. Milne's The Dover Road. McClintic's first major success was on The Barretts of Wimpole Street featuring his wife in 1931. He also directed Hamlet featuring John Gielgud in New York in 1937.

Katharine served on the Board of Directors of The Rehearsal Club, a place where young actresses could stay while looking for work in the theatre. McClintic sometimes found roles for the young women in his plays.

In what may have been lavender marriages, homosexual McClintic was married to actress Estelle Winwood, and then to actress Katharine Cornell—herself a lesbian—for forty years. After they were married, they formed a production team M.C. & C Company, which produced all the plays for the rest of his life. He directed every play that Cornell starred in, including Romeo and Juliet, Candida, Antony and Cleopatra, No Time for Comedy, Antigone, St. Joan, The Doctor's Dilemma, Three Sisters, and There Shall Be No Night, and The Constant Wife. Their production company brought over many of the leading Shakespearean actors of the day, giving them their first prominent Broadway roles, including John Gielgud, Ralph Richardson, Maurice Evans, and Laurence Olivier.


Katharine Cornell was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic. Guthrie McClintic was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York. In what may have been lavender marriages, homosexual McClintic was married to actress Estelle Winwood, and then to actress Katharine Cornell—herself a lesbian—for forty years.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guthrie_McClintic

Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974) was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She was born in Berlin to American parents and raised in Buffalo, New York.

Cornell is regarded as one of the greatest American stage actresses of the 20th century. She was nicknamed "First Lady of the Theatre," a title also bestowed upon her friend Helen Hayes, though each deferred to the other. Cornell is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic; the couple formed a production company, which gave them complete artistic freedom in choosing and producing plays. Their production company gave first or prominent Broadway roles to some of the greatest actors of the 20th century, including many of the great British Shakespearean actors. In addition, the strength of her acting and the quality of the productions brought popular success to such authors as George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare, who until then were not often performed, thereby paving the way for their eventual popularity throughout the country for the rest of the century and beyond.

She married Guthrie McClintic on September 8, 1921, in her aunt's summer home in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. Cornell's family often summered there among other wealthy Americans. Nonetheless, it is generally acknowledged that Cornell was a lesbian, and Guthrie was gay, and their union was a lavender marriage. She was a member of the "sewing circles" in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. The couple eventually bought a townhouse at 23 Beekman Place in Manhattan.


Katharine Cornell was a member of the sewing circles in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. On October 29, 1961, McClintic, Cornell's husband, passed away at his and Cornell’s Palisades home. Over the next 13 years, Cornell split her time between her Manhattan apartment and her beloved Martha’s Vineyard house, where she lived with lifelong friend and companion, Nancy Hamilton.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Cornell

Nancy Hamilton (1908–1985) was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer.

She worked in the New York theater from 1932-1954. She wrote sketches and lyrics for the revues New Faces of 1934 (1934), One for the Money (1939), Two for the Show (1940) and Three to Make Ready (1946). She is best known as the lyricist for the popular song, "How High the Moon." She was the lifelong partner of legendary actress Katharine Cornell.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Hamilton

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4406028.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Helen Jacobs & Virginia Gurnee

Helen Hull Jacobs (August 6, 1908 – June 2, 1997) was a World No. 1 American female tennis player who won ten Grand Slam titles. She was born in Globe, Arizona, United States. Long known to have been lesbian, her lifelong companion was Virginia Gurnee.

Jacobs had a powerful serve and overhead smash and a sound backhand, but she never learned to hit a flat forehand, despite her friendship, and some coaching, from Bill Tilden. Like both her Wightman Cup coach Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman and her archrival Helen Wills Moody, she grew up in Berkeley, California, learned the game at the Berkeley Tennis Club, pursued her undergraduate degree at the University of California, Berkeley and was inducted into the Cal Sports Hall of Fame.

Jacobs won five Grand Slam singles titles and was an eleven-time Grand Slam singles runner-up. Six of those losses were to Helen Wills Moody. Jacobs's only victory over Moody was in the final of the 1933 U.S. Championships. Moody retired from the match with a back injury while trailing 3–0 in the third set to a chorus of boos from the audience who believed that Moody quit the match merely to deny Jacobs the satisfaction of finishing out her victory. It was reported by many witnesses after the match that Moody still planned to play her doubles match later that afternoon but was advised against it because she was "injured" after all. Years later, Moody confirmed her injury, saying, "My back is kind of funny. The vertebra between the fourth and fifth disk is thin. When the disk slips around it's intolerable. It rained the whole week before that final match. I lay in bed, and that was bad because it stiffened worse. I just couldn't play any longer, but I didn't say anything because it would look like an excuse." Jacobs almost defeated Moody again when she had match point at 6–3, 3–6, 5–4 in the 1935 Wimbledon singles final but lost the match. In the 1938 Wimbledon final against Moody, Jacobs turned her ankle at 4–4 in the first set and hobbled around the court for the remainder of the match, with Moody winning the final eight games and the second set lasting a mere eight minutes. When asked after the match why she did not accept Hazel Wightman's on-court advice to quit the match after the injury, Jacobs said that continuing was the sporting thing to do so that Moody could enjoy the full taste of victory, an obvious allusion to Moody's retirement from the 1933 U.S. final. Moody said, "I was very sorry about Helen's ankle. But it couldn't be helped, could it? I thought there was nothing I could do but get it over as quickly as possible." In total, Jacobs lost 14 of the 15 career singles matches she played against Moody.


©Leslie Jones (1886-1967)/Courtesy of the Boston Public Library. Helen Jacobs and Helen Wills, between 1917 and 1934 (©17)
Helen Jacobs was a World No. 1 American female tennis player who won ten Grand Slam titles. Jacobs won five Grand Slam singles titles and was an eleven-time Grand Slam singles runner-up. Six of those losses were to Helen Wills Moody. Jacobs's only victory over Moody was in the final of the 1933 U.S. Championships. In 1933, Jacobs became the first woman to break with tradition by wearing man-tailored shorts at Wimbledon. Long known to have been lesbian, her lifelong companion was Virginia Gurnee.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Jacobs

More Real Life Romances at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher



This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4406431.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Jess Collins & Robert Duncan

Jess Collins (August 6, 1923 – January 2, 2004), simply known today as Jess, was an American visual artist.

Jess was born Burgess Franklin Collins in Long Beach, California. He was drafted into the military and worked on the production of plutonium for the Manhattan Project. After his discharge in 1946, Jess worked at the Hanford Atomic Energy Project in Richland, Washington, and painted in his spare time, but his dismay at the threat of atomic weapons led him to abandon his scientific career and focus on his art.

In 1949, Jess enrolled in the California School of the Arts (now the San Francisco Art Institute) and, after breaking with his family, began referring to himself simply as "Jess". He met Robert Duncan in 1951 and began a relationship with the poet that lasted until Duncan's death in 1988. In 1952, in San Francisco, Jess, with Duncan and painter Harry Jacobus, opened the King Ubu Gallery, which became an important venue for alternative art and which remained so when, in 1954, poet Jack Spicer reopened the space as the Six Gallery.

Many of Jess's paintings and collages have themes drawn from chemistry, alchemy, the occult, and male beauty, including a series called Translations (1959–1976) which is done with heavily laid-on paint in a paint-by-number style. In 1975, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art displayed six of the "Translations" paintings in their MATRIX 2 exhibition. Collins also created elaborate collages using old book illustrations and comic strips (particularly, the strip Dick Tracy, which he used to make his own strip Tricky Cad). Jess's final work, Narkissos, is a complex rendered 6'x5' drawing owned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.


In 1951 Robert Duncan met the artist Jess Collins and began a collaboration and partnership that lasted 37 years till Duncan's death. In 1952, in San Francisco, Jess, with Duncan and painter Harry Jacobus, opened the King Ubu Gallery, which became an important venue for alternative art and which remained so when, in 1954, poet Jack Spicer reopened the space as the Six Gallery. Many of Duncan's poems--such as "These Past Years: Passages 10"--celebrate his love for Jess Collins.



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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jess_Collins

Robert Duncan wrote a remarkable series of poems that deal directly with the love of men for other men.

While living in Philadelphia, Duncan had his first recorded homosexual relationship with an instructor he had first met in Berkeley. In 1941 he was drafted and declared his homosexuality to get discharged. In 1943, he had his first heterosexual relationship which ended in a short, disastrous marriage. In 1944 Duncan had a relationship with the abstract expressionist painter Robert De Niro, Sr., the father of famed actor Robert De Niro, Jr.

Duncan’s name figures prominently in the history of pre-Stonewall gay culture. In 1944, Duncan wrote the landmark essay The Homosexual in Society. The essay, in which Duncan compared the plight of homosexuals with that of African Americans and Jews, was published in Dwight Macdonald's journal Politics. Duncan's essay is considered a pioneering treatise on the experience of homosexuals in American society given its appearance a full decade before any organized Gay rights movement (Mattachine Society). (Picture: Jess Collins)

In 1951 Duncan met the artist Jess Collins and began a collaboration and partnership that lasted 37 years till Duncan's death. In 1952, in San Francisco, Jess, with Duncan and painter Harry Jacobus, opened the King Ubu Gallery, which became an important venue for alternative art and which remained so when, in 1954, poet Jack Spicer reopened the space as the Six Gallery.

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Citation Information
Author: Johnson, Terrence
Entry Title: Duncan, Robert
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2002
Date Last Updated July 19, 2005
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/duncan_r.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date February 3, 2013
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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Bruce Benderson (born August 6, 1946)

Bruce Benderson (born August 6, 1946) is an American author, to Jewish parents of Russian descent, who lives in New York. He attended William Nottingham High School (1964) in Syracuse, New York and then Binghamton University (1968). He is today a novelist, essayist, journalist and translator, widely published in France, less so in the United States.

In 2004, Benderson's lengthy erotic memoir Autobiographie érotique, about a nine-month sojourn in Romania, won the prestigious French literary prize, the Prix de Flore. The book was published in the United States (Tarcher/Penguin) and the United Kingdom (Snow Books) in 2006 under the title The Romanian: Story of an Obsession.

Benderson's book-length essay, Toward the New Degeneracy (1997), looks at New York’s Times Square, where rich and poor once mixed in a lively atmosphere of drugs, sex, and commerce. Benderson argues that this kind of mingling of classes has been the source of many modern avant-garde movements, and he laments the disappearance of that particular milieu. His novel User (1994) is a lyrical descent into the world of junkies and male hustlers. He is also the author of James Bidgood (Taschen, 1999), about the maker of the cult film Pink Narcissus.

A book-length essay by Benderson, "Sexe et Solitude," about the extinction of urban space and the rise of the Internet, was published in French in 1999. A collection of his essays, published under the title "Attitudes," appeared in French in 2006. These essays, along with "Sexe et Solitude" and "Toward the New Degeneracy," were printed in America in a nonfiction anthology of Benderson's writings entitled "Sex and Isolation" (University of Wisconsin Press, 2007), which was cited as one of the 10 best university press books of the year by the magazine "Foreword." The year 2007 also saw the publication in French (Editions Payot & Rivages) of a new novel by Benderson called "Pacific Agony," a caustic satire of life in America's Pacific Northwest, as well as Benderson's personal illustrated encyclopedia of the 60s and 70s, "Concentré de contreculture" (Editions Scali), published in French only. The novel "Pacific Agony" was published in English by Semiotext(e)/MIT in fall 2009.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Benderson
I first read Bruce Benderson‘s novel User a couple of years after its debut in 1995. Stirring, seductive prose sucked me right into this exhaustive portrayal of urban prostitution and drug addiction in early 1990‘s Times Square. From the first page, a soiled, silken procession of words rendered me weak-kneed, incapable of pulling out until long after its final avian image had flown. Reading it again ten years later confirmed my original feelings. This is a remarkable novel.
[...]
Benderson shows us that everyone is a user and is used as well. To be used is not always to be abused. At times, it benefits the used more than the user. Sometimes, both parties benefit, sometimes neither. There is the temptation to wonder who benefited more in the making of this novel, Benderson or those who were used as the basis of its characters.
[...]
It was in late March of 2007, that I went to a celebration for the Romanian writer Ruda Popa at the Russian restaurant Samovar in Manhattan. The friend I was to meet there didn‘t make it. Upstairs in the salon, I took a seat at the white U-shape made of long tables pushed together. I could not avoid noticing the garish makeup of the 60-or-so-year-old woman who sat next to me. Adroit with a worn down pencil, she calculated her way through several puzzles in a small Sudoku book. Her cloying perfume mingled mercilessly in my head with the mind-altering shot glasses of vodka I downed as they were offered to me on silver trays. As soon as the guest of honor finished talking, she sighed and pushed her chair back away from the table. I recognized Bruce Benderson sitting on the other side of her. I had heard him read years before during one of the many readings hosted by C. Bard Cole in the East Village. This time I introduced myself and we spent the next several hours together talking about all manner of things including his desire not to be labeled gay and the sad fact that his new novel, Pacific Agony would probably not be published in English. Benderson‘s caustic yet cavalier wit did not disappoint. --Rob Stephenson, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered
Further Readings:

The Romanian: Story of an Obsession by Bruce Benderson
Reading level: Ages 18 and up
Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Tarcher (February 2, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1585424781
ISBN-13: 978-1585424788
Amazon: The Romanian: Story of an Obsession

Winner of the 2004 Prix de Flore-one of France's most distinguished literary prizes-a wildly romantic, true-life love story

History follows a trail of sputtering desire, often calling upon the delusions of lovers to generate the sparks. If it weren't for us, the world would suffer from a dismal lack of stories," writes Bruce Benderson in this brutally candid memoir.

"What astonishes and intrigues is Benderson's way of recounting, in the sweetest possible voice, things that are considered shocking," wrote Le Monde. What's so shocking? It's not just Benderson's job translating Céline Dion's saccharine autobiography, which he admits is driving him mad; but his unrequited love for an impoverished Romanian in "cheap club-kid platforms with dollar signs in his squinting eyes," whom he meets while on a journalism assignment in Eastern Europe.

Rather than retreat, Benderson absorbs everything he can about Romanian culture and discovers an uncanny similarity between his own obsession for the Romanian (named Romulus) and the disastrous love affair of King Carol II, the last king of Romania (1893-1953). Throughout, Benderson-"absolutely free of bitterness, nastiness, or any desire to protect himself," wrote Le Monde-is sustained by little white codeine pills, a poetic self-awareness, a sense of humor, and an unwavering belief in the perfect romance, even as wild dogs chase him down Romanian streets.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels


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Joey L. Mogul (born August 6, 1970)

Joey Mogul, a People's Law Office attorney, recently co-authored a book exploring the experiences of sexually non-conforming people in the criminal justice system. In recent years, PLO has been representing more and more people from LGBTQ communities, who have been targeted or punished in the criminal legal system because of their gender identity or sexual orientation. This has included representing a lesbian who was sentenced to death for murder, where the focus of the prosecution sentencing argument was that she was a “hard core lesbian”; representing several transgender and gender non-conforming people who have been illegally and unconstitutionally strip searched, harassed or discriminated against while in police custody; and defending gay men who are falsely accused of engaging in public sex acts. PLO is also involved in efforts to force police departments to change their policies, or lack of policies, concerning the treatment of transgender or gender non-conforming people while in police custody.

People's Law Office (PLO) is a law office in Chicago, Illinois, which focuses on representing clients who have been the victims of attacks by governmental officials and agencies. Such clients include political activists who have been targeted because of their opinions or organizing work, people who have been wrongfully arrested and imprisoned or subjected to excessive force, and criminal defendants. People’s Law Office currently has eight attorneys — Michael Deutsch, Ben Elson, Sarah Gelsomino, Janine Hoft, Joey Mogul, John Stainthorp, Jan Susler and Flint Taylor, with former partner Jeff Haas of counsel. The office has three full-time support staff — Lourdes Arias, Alberto Rodriguez and Brad Thomson.

Further Readings:

Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States by Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, Kay Whitlock
Series: Queer Action / Queer Ideas
Paperback: 240 pages
Publisher: Beacon Press; a edition (January 24, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0807051152
ISBN-13: 978-0807051153
Amazon: Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States
Amazon Kindle: Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States

Winner of the 2011 PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency

A groundbreaking work that turns a “queer eye” on the criminal legal system, Queer (In)Justice is a searing examination of queer experiences—as “suspects,” defendants, prisoners, and survivors of crime. The authors unpack queer criminal archetypes—like “gleeful gay killers,” “lethal lesbians,” “disease spreaders,” and “deceptive gender benders”—to illustrate the punishment of queer expression, regardless of whether a crime was ever committed. Tracing stories from the streets to the bench to behind prison bars, they prove that the policing of sex and gender both bolsters and reinforces racial and gender inequalities.

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels

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Jamie McGonnigal & Sean Carlson

Jamie McGonnigal (born August 6, 1975 in Weymouth, Massachusetts) is a voice actor, actor, producer, activist and director, who has worked for various companies such as 4Kids Entertainment, NYAV Post, DuArt Film and Video and FUNimation Entertainment. McGonnigal currently lives in Washington, D.C. with his dog, Eli and husband Sean Carlson, whom he married on May 18, 2013 in a lovely beach ceremony at Cape Cod, MA. He is the Community Engagement Manager for the New Organizing Institute and a blogger for HuffingtonPost.com.

"After college I moved to New York (ndr 1999). I worked in theater, produced Broadway concerts and became a voice actor for Pokémon and dozens of other cartoons. I was out, and I was happy. I even had a few relationships. I was never wealthy, but I made ends meet. I was fighting for equality, and it felt right, but strangely enough, I still had that little boy's voice echoing in my head telling me that I'd never have that day -- the same one I'd seen my brothers through, and my best friend, twice. It wasn't something that made me angry -- ever. It was something I'd just accepted as fact.

A few years later I was putting together a rally to fight the anti-gay military policy "don't ask, don't tell." I'd brought a bus full of people from New York to D.C. for the event, and the night before, I was running to different gay bars around the city to promote the rally. I walked into Nellie's sports bar, and a man walked up to me.

"You're not from here, are you?" he said.


Jamie McGonnigal (born August 6, 1975) is a voice actor, actor, producer, activist and director, who has worked for various companies such as 4Kids Entertainment, NYAV Post, DuArt Film and Video and FUNimation Entertainment. McGonnigal currently lives in Washington, D.C. with his dog, Eli and husband Sean Carlson, whom he married on May 18, 2013 in a lovely beach ceremony at Cape Cod. He is the Community Engagement Manager for the New Organizing Institute and a blogger for HuffingtonPost.com.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamie_McGonnigal

More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance



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Martin Bauml Duberman (born August 6, 1930)

Martin Bauml Duberman (born August 6, 1930) is an American historian, philosopher, playwright, and gay-rights activist. He is the Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at Lehman College and the Graduate School of the City University of New York and was the founder and first director of the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies at the CUNY Graduate School. He has authored over twenty books including James Russell Lowell (a National Book Award finalist), Paul Robeson, Stonewall, and the memoir Cures: A Gay Man's Odyssey. He is also a neoabolitionist scholar, as evidenced by his edited collection of essays, The Antislavery Vanguard. His play In White America won the Vernon Rice/Drama Desk Award for Best Off-Broadway Production in 1963.

In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War. Around the same time, he wrote an article in the Partisan Review "criticiz[ing] SNCC and CORE for being 'anarchists,' for rejecting the authority of the state, for insisting that community be voluntary, and for stressing, along with SDS, participatory instead of representative democracy."

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Bauml_Duberman

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices


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UK Meet: Rhys Ford

Starting from June 1, 2015, I will daily feature authors attending the three conventions I will join, Euro Pride in Munich (July), UK Meet in Bristol (September) and GRL in San Diego (October).

For the UK Meet in Bristol, September 11-13, 2015, today author is Rhys Ford (Rhys Ford will also attend GRL in San Diego): Rhys Ford was born and raised in Hawai’i then wandered off to see the world. After chewing through a pile of books, a lot of odd food, and a stray boyfriend or two, Rhys eventually landed in San Diego, which is a very nice place but seriously needs more rain.

Rhys admits to sharing the house with three cats of varying degrees of black fur and a ginger cairn terrorist. Rhys is also enslaved to the upkeep a 1979 Pontiac Firebird, a Toshiba laptop, and an overworked red coffee maker.

Further Readings:

Ink and Shadows by Rhys Ford
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: DSP Publications (July 7, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1634760166
ISBN-13: 978-1634760164
Amazon: Ink and Shadows
Amazon Kindle: Ink and Shadows

Book One of Ink and Shadows

Kismet Andreas lives in fear of the shadows.

For the young tattoo artist, the shadows hold more than darkness. He is certain of his insanity because the dark holds creatures and crawling things only he can see―monsters who hunt out the weak to eat their minds and souls, leaving behind only empty husks and despair.

And if there’s one thing Kismet fears more than being hunted―it’s the madness left in its wake.

The shadowy Veil is Mal’s home. As Pestilence, he is the youngest―and most inexperienced―of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, immortal manifestations resurrected to serve―and cull―mankind. Invisible to all but the dead and insane, the Four exist between the Veil and the mortal world, bound to their nearly eternal fate. Feared by other immortals, the Horsemen live in near solitude but Mal longs to know more than Death, War and Famine.

Mal longs to be… more human. To interact with someone other than lunatics or the deceased.

When Kismet rescues Mal from a shadowy attack, Pestilence is suddenly thrust into a vicious war―where mankind is the prize, and the only one who has faith in Mal is the human the other Horsemen believe is destined to die.

&

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GRL: Wendy Rathbone

Starting from June 1, 2015, I will daily feature authors attending the three conventions I will join, Euro Pride in Munich (July), UK Meet in Bristol (September) and GRL in San Diego (October).

For the GRL in San Diego, October 15-18, 2015, today author is Wendy Rathbone: Wendy Rathbone has had dozens of stories published in anthologies such as: Hot Blood, Writers of the Future (second place,) Bending the Landscape, Mutation Nation, A Darke Phantastique, and more. The book "Dreams of Decadence Presents: Wendy Rathbone and Tippi Blevins" contains a large collection of her vampire stories and poems. Over 500 of her poems have been published in various anthologies and magazines. She won first place in the Anamnesis Press poetry chapbook contest with her book "Scrying the River Styx." Her poems have been nominated for the Science Fiction Poetry Association's Rhysling award at least a dozen times. She lives in Yucca Valley, CA with her partner of 32 years, Della Van Hise.

Further Readings:

Turn Left at November by Wendy Rathbone
Paperback: 76 pages
Publisher: Eldritch Press; 1st. edition (February 20, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0692393250
ISBN-13: 978-0692393253
Amazon: Turn Left at November

Celebrated poet and author Wendy Rathbone brings her considerable talent to bear once again in her moving poetry collection, "Turn Left at November," moving through the golden season in many guises. Lost in the wonder of the "Night Servant, balancing the un-dusted moon," wandering under the moonlit skies, or basking in the glow of "your jewel-lined way" in the "House of the Wind."



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2015 Rainbow Awards Submission: Southern Charm 4: When in Bloom by Nicole Dennis

Southern Charm 4: When in Bloom by Nicole Dennis
Gay Contemporary Romance
Series: Southern Charm
Paperback: 222 pages
Publisher: Totally Bound Publishing (February 20, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1784304417
ISBN-13: 978-1784304416
Amazon: Southern Charm 4: When in Bloom
Amazon Kindle: Southern Charm 4: When in Bloom

Will the personal challenges of a former Army doctor and a brilliant florist get in the way of a chance at life and love? Fighting type one diabetes since childhood, Jude Sebastian runs to prove he can live a normal life, until epileptic seizures begin to change his life. Even with Dawson, his medical alert Golden Labrador, at his side, Jude finds daily life difficult. He owns the floral shop Flowers in the Breeze, and designs everything from simple bouquets to elaborate themes for weddings and celebrations. At the Shore Breeze Clinic, Jude comes across a man clearly suffering with a PTSD episode. A new arrival in the small town, Doctor Elliott Sheffield, a retired Army Ranger doctor, is looking for a second chance after what he saw in the Middle Eastern deserts. Wanting a normal relationship, Jude tries to deny his disorder, but something is happening. He can’t regulate his sugars and his disorder worsens. When he returns to the clinic, Dawson alerts Jude to an oncoming seizure.

2015 Rainbow Awards Guidelines: http://www.elisarolle.com/rainbowawards/rainbow_awards_2015.html

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