August 29th, 2015

andrew potter

Carrie Chapman Catt & Mary Garrett Hay

Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947) was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. Catt served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and was the founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women. She "led an army of voteless women in 1919 to pressure Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving them the right to vote and convinced state legislatures to ratify it in 1920" and "was one of the best-known women in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century and was on all lists of famous American women".

Born Carrie Clinton Lane in Ripon, Wisconsin to Lucius and Maria Louisa (Clinton) Lane, Catt spent her childhood in Charles City, Iowa. She moved to Iowa at the age of seven where she began preparatory schooling. As a child Catt was interested in science and wanted to become a doctor. After graduating from high school, she enrolled at Iowa State Agricultural College (now Iowa State University) in Ames, Iowa.

Catt's father was initially reluctant to allow her to attend college, but he relented, contributing only a part of the costs. To make ends meet, Catt worked as a dishwasher, in the school library, and as a teacher at rural schools during school breaks. Catt’s freshman class consisted of 27 students; six of whom were female. Catt joined the Crescent Literary Society, a student organization aimed at advancing student learning skills and self-confidence. Because only men were allowed to speak in meetings, Catt defied the rules and spoke up during a male debate. This started a discussion about women’s participation in the group, and ultimately led to women gaining the right to speak in meetings. Catt was also a member of Pi Beta Phi, started an all girls' debate club, and advocated for women's participation in military drill.


The Carrie Chapman Catt House, also known as Juniper Ledge, is located on Ryder Road in the town of New Castle, New York, United States. It is an Arts and Crafts-style building from the early 20th century. In 2006 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places; five years later it was designated a town landmark as well.
Carrie Chapman Catt was in a relationship with Mary Garrett Hay, a suffragist leader from New York. It is uncertain whether Catt was a lesbian, as she was reserved and did not care for public displays of emotional affection. Despite being married twice, Catt did not live with her husband full time. After the death of Leo Chapman, she and Hay lived together. Hay was not a part of the international circle of elites that Catt aligned herself with; however, everyone knew that they had a special love for one another. Catt requested burial alongside Hay, rather than either of her husbands.


Carrie Chapman Catt & Mary Garrett Hay are buried side by side in the Bronx's Woodlawn Cemetery marked by a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrie_Chapman_Catt

Mary Garrett Hay (August 29, 1857 - August 29, 1928), temperance worker, club woman, and suffragist from Indiana, politically organized the state and city of New York to pass suffrage, winning the most populous state for the suffrage ranks. As President of the New York Equal Suffrage League and the New York City Woman Suffrage Party, she directed the city’s suffrage groups in the state campaigns of 1915 and 1917. Parades, street rallies, and infinite organization won New York for suffrage in 1917. Respected for her consummate political skills, her close association with Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947) gave her enormous political clout within the suffrage ranks.

Attending political meetings with her father and entertaining politicians in their home, Hay pursued her political interests through reform. She joined the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and a suffrage club, developing a close, life-long association with Mrs. Catt. Organizing California along political lines for the state referendum (1896) gave her experience for the later victory in New York. Hay became Catt’s chief assistant and, after Catt was widowed, they made their home together. As president of the New York State Federation of Women’s Clubs (1910-12) and director of the General Federation (national) of Women’s Clubs (1914-18), Hay brought the woman’s club movement to suffrage. Hay headed NAWSA’s suffrage lobbying with Republican congressmen. Active in the party, she chaired the Republican convention platform committee – unprecedented for a woman. After winning the vote, Hay chaired the New York city League of Women Voters.


Carrie Chapman Catt was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. Mary Garrett Hay was an active suffragist who worked closely with Carrie Chapman Catt. Hay became Catt’s chief assistant and, after Catt was widowed the second time, they lived together. According to the 1910 U.S. census, Ms. Hay resided with the widowed Mrs. Carrie Catt at 257 Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City.

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Source: www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/mary-garrett-hay/

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Edward Carpenter & George Merrill

Edward Carpenter (29 August 1844 – 28 June 1929) was an English socialist poet, socialist philosopher, anthologist, and early gay activist. (Picture: Edward Carpenter by Fred Holland Day (1864-1933)

A leading figure in late 19th- and early 20th-century Britain, he was instrumental in the foundation of the Fabian Society and the Labour Party. A poet and writer, he was a close friend of Walt Whitman and Rabindranath Tagore, corresponding with many famous figures such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, James Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, George Merrill, E D Morel, William Morris, E R Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner.

As a philosopher he is particularly known for his publication of 
Civilisation, Its Cause and Cure in which he proposes that civilisation is a form of disease that human societies pass through. Civilisations, he says, rarely last more than a thousand years before collapsing, and no society has ever passed through civilisation successfully. His 'cure' is a closer association with the land and greater development of our inner nature. Although derived from his experience of Hindu mysticism, and referred to as 'mystical socialism', his thoughts parallel those of several writers in the field of psychology and sociology at the start of the twentieth century, such as Boris Sidis, Sigmund Freud and Wilfred Trotter who all recognised that society puts ever increasing pressure on the individual that can result in mental and physical illnesses such as neurosis and the particular nervousness which was then described as neurasthenia.

A strong advocate of sexual freedom, living in a gay community near Sheffield, he had a profound influence on both D. H. Lawrence and E. M. Forster.


Edward Carpenter & George Merrill: Edward Carpenter was a socialist poet and philosopher, anthologist, and early gay activist. Returning from India in 1891, Carpenter met George Merrill, a working class man also from Sheffield, and the two men struck up a relationship, eventually moving in together in 1898. In January 1928, Merrill died suddenly, leaving Carpenter devastated. In May 1928, Carpenter suffered a paralytic stroke which rendered him almost helpless. He lived another 13 months before he died on Friday 28 June 1929.


Edward Carpenter & George Merrill are buried together at Guildford Cemetery, Surrey; under Merrill’s name you read “about 40 years with Edward Carpenter.”

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George Merrill (1866 – 10 January 1928) was the lifetime companion of English poet and gay activist Edward Carpenter.

Merrill, a working-class young man who had been raised in the slums of Sheffield, had no formal education. He met Edward Carpenter on a train in 1891, and moved into Carpenter's home at Millthorpe in 1898. His arrival was commemorated by Carpenter in the poem Hafiz to the Cupbearer.

The two lived openly as a couple for thirty years, until Merrill died. When Carpenter himself died the following year, he was buried beside Merrill.

The relationship between Carpenter and Merrill formed the motivation for E. M. Forster's novel Maurice, and the character of the gamekeeper Alec Scudder was in part modeled after George Merrill.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Carpenter

Further Readings:

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Elisabeth Irwin & Katharine Anthony

Elisabeth Antoinette Irwin (29 August 1880, Brooklyn, New York–16 October 1942, Manhattan, age 62) was the founder of the Little Red School House. She was an educator, psychologist, reformer, and declared lesbian, living with her life partner Katharine Anthony and the two children they adopted. (P: Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School)

Irwin was born in Brooklyn, to William Henry Irwin and Josephina Augusta Easton. Her father was a cotton merchant. She attended the Packer Collegiate Institute and received her A.B. from Smith College in 1903, and her M.A. from Columbia University in 1923. She was a member of the feminist intellectual club Heterodoxy.

In 1912 while a member of the staff of the Public Education Association, she began work at revising the curriculum for the children at Public School 64. She founded the Little Red School House curriculum, in Manhattan in 1921, in the red-painted annex of Public School 61. Her work there, and then at Public School 41, a New York Times article describes as an experiment to demonstrate that "...the broader, more active program of the so-called progressive schools could be carried out under public school conditions."


Elisabeth Irwin and a Little Red School House student, circa 1933.
Katharine Susan Anthony (1877-1965) was a US biographer best known for The Lambs (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. From the 1920s, she lived in Manhattan with her life-partner Elisabeth Irwin (1880–1942), the founder of the Little Red School House, with whom she raised several adopted children. In Gaylordsville, Connecticut Anthony and Irwin maintained a summer home, and from that they called themselves the "gay ladies of Gaylordsville".


Elisabeth Irwin & Katharine Anthony are buried together at Morningside Cemetery, Gaylordsville. Irwin died in 1942, survived by Anthony and their two adopted daughters, Mrs. Howard Gresens of Plandome, New York and Mrs. R.O. Bogue of Pensacola, Florida. She was buried at Gaylordsville, where Katharine joined her when she died in 1965 at 87.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_Irwin

Katharine Susan Anthony, sometimes also spelled Katherine (November 27, 1877 – November 20, 1965), was a US biographer best known for The Lambs (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. From the 1920s, she lived in Manhattan with her life-partner Elisabeth Irwin (1880–1942), the founder of the Little Red School House, with whom she raised several adopted children. In Gaylordsville, Connecticut Anthony and Irwin maintained a summer home, and from that they called themselves the "gay ladies of Gaylordsville".

Katharine Anthony was born in Roseville, Logan County, Arkansas, the third daughter of Ernest Augustus Anthony 1846-1904 and Susan Jane Cathey 1845-1917. Her father was a grocer and later a police officer.

She studied at Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, the Universities of Heidelberg and Freiburg, and the University of Chicago. She received a Ph.B degree from Chicago in 1905 and taught at Wellesley College in 1907. She became a public school teacher by 1910 and worked at that time in Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Arkansas. She moved from Arkansas perhaps because her mother had died in 1917.

Her book Catherine the Great was positively reviewed in the New York Times (Dec 20, 1925, pg BR8), which notes that Miss Anthony had, apparently for the first time, access to all of Catherine's private memoirs. Her book Marie Antoinette was called a "...fresh and original life of Marie ..." by the New York Times reviewer (Jan 29, 1933 pg BR5).

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Anthony

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

Mike Kitay & Thom Gunn

Thom Gunn, born Thomson William Gunn (29 August 1929 – 25 April 2004), was an Anglo-American poet who was praised both for his early verses in England, where he was associated with The Movement and his later poetry in America, even after moving toward a looser, free-verse style. After relocating from England to San Francisco, Gunn, who became openly gay, wrote about gay-related topics — particularly in his most famous work, The Man With Night Sweats in 1992 — as well as drug use, sex, and topics related to his bohemian lifestyle. He won numerous major literary awards.

In 2004, he died at his home in the Haight Ashbury neighborhood in San Francisco, in the same bed he shared with Mike Kitay since 1960.

Gunn was born in Gravesend, Kent, the son of Bert Gunn. Both of his parents were journalists, and they divorced when he was 10 years old. His life was marked by tragedy when, as a teenager, his mother committed suicide. It was she who had sparked in him a love of reading, including an interest in the work of Christopher Marlowe, John Keats, John Milton, and Alfred Tennyson, along with several prose writers. In his youth, he attended University College School in Hampstead, London, then spent two years in the British national service and six months in Paris. Later, he studied English literature at Trinity College, Cambridge, graduated in 1953, and published his first collection of verse, Fighting Terms, the following year. Among several critics who praised the work, John Press wrote, "This is one of the few volumes of postwar verse that all serious readers of poetry need to possess and to study."


Thom Gunn was an Anglo-American poet who was praised for both his early verses in England, where he was associated with The Movement and his later poetry in America. In 1950, then a student at Cambridge's Trinity College, he met his life partner, Mike Kitay, an American student. In 1954, Gunn immigrated to the US to teach writing at Stanford University and to remain close to Kitay. In 2004, he died at his home in San Francisco, in the same bed he shared with Mike Kitay since 1960.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thom_Gunn

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Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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andrew potter

John Andrew Frey & Peter Louis Morris

Peter Louis Morris of Capitol Hill died peacefully on Sunday, August 29, 2010. Born December 29, 1929, in Peekskill, NY, he was beloved partner of Jack Frey (Aug. 29, 1929 - Aug. 22, 1997), with whom he is buried under a common burial resembling a bench in the Congressional Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia.

Together 43 years, they met while Catholic University students at DC’s then most popular gay male establishment, the piano bar/restaurant the Chicken Hut on H Street near Lafayette Park where biweekly, Sunday afternoon gay dances were later sponsored by the Mattachine Society of Washington in 1961 and 1962. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.

In the absence of any other information, MICHAEL WILLIAM HILDEBRAND is presumed to be gay because of the proximity of his grave to that of John Frey and Peter Morris suggesting they might have been friends, and because of the shape and color of his unique gravestone reminiscent of the Pink Triangle, the symbol gay men were forced to wear in Nazi concentration camps.

All over Frey and Morris's bench, Inscription read:
Us While wandering down the back roads Of my mind I came upon a memory of us Faces garden-fresh blooming and Full of promise.
My inner-eye welled up Furrows have etched their way Into our fields of being. What had youth's straightness Now bends and curves into Accommodation.
We have become ourselves Not alone, but with each other's Help.
On the face of it, youth's bloom Has gone Replaced by hardier stuff Whose roots are deep and all Encompassing.
How fortunate we were to Have loved each other then And even more so, to still Love each other Now.
Forty-three years together Is not enough But we will be together again.
John Andrew Frey August 29, 1929 August 22, 1997
Peter Louis Morris December 29, 1929 August 29, 2010
In Memory of our Parents George Henry Frey Marie Berter Frey
Louis Morris Sr. Dorothea Chaplin Morris
And our pets, Bucky, Pudgy, Major, Jelp I II, Rosh I II III, Franah I II, Mime I II, Madame


Together 43 years, John Andrew Frey & Peter Louis Morris met while Catholic University students at DC’s then most popular gay male establishment, the piano bar/restaurant the Chicken Hut on H Street near Lafayette Park where biweekly. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.

Source: www.leonardmatlovich.com/images/HCC_Gay_Graves_Map_DRAFT-B.pdf

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andrew potter

Owen Hawley & Ralph Schroeder

Owen Hawley (August 29, 1930 - July 31, 2006) and Ralph Schroeder (1920 - 1976) are buried together at Mound Cemetery, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, USA

Owen Hawley was a professor at Marietta College. He lived with another man, the same way someone else would live with a wife or a husband. His partner, Ralph Schroeder, died in 1976, and Owen Hawley died in 2006. They are buried in Mound Cemetery, along with many Revolutionary War soldiers and the early political and religious leaders of Marietta. May be the first gay couple to be buried there.

At WASHINGTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY people can browse the Ralph Schroeder and Owen Hawley Architecture Collection, a XIX and XX century photography collection of Marietta's buildings.


Owen Hawley (August 29, 1930 - July 31, 2006) was a professor at Marietta College. He lived with another man, the same way someone else would live with a wife or a husband. His partner, Ralph Schroeder (1920 - 1976), died in 1976, and Owen Hawley died in 2006. They are buried in Mound Cemetery, along with many Revolutionary War soldiers and the early political and religious leaders of Marietta. May be the first gay couple to be buried there.

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andrew potter

Jim Van Buskirk (born August 29, 1952)

Jim Van Buskirk was born in Los Angeles and grew up in Buena Park, California. A resident of San Francisco since 1972, Jim received a B.A. in Sociology in 1977 and an M.L.I.S. in 1981, both from University of California, Berkeley. As part of his course work, he helped develop and install “Out of the Closet,” an exhibit sponsored by the Pacific Center for Human Growth, which was installed during 1979-80 in public and college libraries throughout the Bay Area. An account of the project, “On Display: Presenting Gay Culture in a Library Setting,” appeared in a special issue of Catalyst: A Socialist Journal of the Social Services (No. 12, 1981). Contributing book and video reviews to Library Journal from 1981- 2000, Jim received the first Library Journal Reviewer of the Year: Nonfiction Award in June 1997.

His reviews have also appeared in James White Review, Art Documentation, Photo Metro, Lambda Book Report, Library Quarterly, Bay Area Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Bay Guardian and the Harvard Gay and Lesbian Review and on culturevulture.net. He has made presentations at American Library Association (ALA), California Library Association (CLA), Special Libraries Association, College Art Association, Art Libraries Society/North America (ARLIS/NA) and at the library schools of University of California, Berkeley and San Jose State University .

He is a founding member of the Gay and Lesbian Interests Round Tables of both CLA and ARLIS/NA. At the 20th annual conference of ARLIS/NA in Chicago, Jim planned and participated in a panel entitled “Sexual Perversity in Chicago: Researching the Impact of Artists’ Sexuality on Their Work” presenting the paper “Between the Lines: The Often Fruitless Quest for Gay and Lesbian Materials,” published in Art Documentation (11:4, Winter 92). He served as one of the editors of the Bibliography of Gay and Lesbian Art published in 1994 by the Gay and Lesbian Caucus of the College Art Association and his regular book review column appears in the Newsletter of the Gay and Lesbian Caucus of CAA. His essay “Queer Impressions of Gustave Caillebotte” launched on Queer Arts Resource in June 1998.

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Source: http://www.jimvanbuskirk.com/bio.html

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices


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GRL: Alexa Land

Starting from June 1, 2015, I will daily feature authors attending the three conventions I will join, Euro Pride in Munich (July), UK Meet in Bristol (September) and GRL in San Diego (October).

For the GRL in San Diego, October 15-18, 2015, today author is Alexa Land: "I write and independently publish M/M love stories. My best-selling Firsts and Forever series includes: Way Off Plan, All In, In Pieces, Gathering Storm, Salvation, Skye Blue, Against the Wall and Belonging. Coming Home will be released in later summer, 2015.

I've also published Feral, a paranormal M/M romance, and The Tinder Chronicles, a paranormal trilogy."

Further Readings:

Coming Home by Alexa Land
Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 17, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1515191826
ISBN-13: 978-1515191827
Amazon: Coming Home
Amazon Kindle: Coming Home

For twenty-six-year-old rent boy Chance Matthews, surviving day-to-day in San Francisco is difficult enough. Then an ill-fated road trip to Wyoming to search for his biological father throws his life into a tailspin. When a string of catastrophes leaves him stranded and desperate, help comes from the last person he’d expect. His knight in shining armor is everything he could want and then some, but Chance is sure a man like that would never want someone like him. That’s the stuff of fairy tales, and he stopped believing in those a long time ago. Coming Home is the ninth book in Alexa Land’s best-selling Firsts and Forever series, but each book can stand alone, so jump in anywhere.



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andrew potter

2015 Rainbow Awards Submission: All in a Day’s Work

All in a Day’s Work by Shae Connor, Bru Baker, Holly O. Hale, Therese Woodson, Henrietta Clarke, Jenni Michaels, Amy Jo Cousins, Kay Walker
Gay Anthology / Collection / Contemporary Romance
Paperback: 200 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (September 22, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 163216504X
ISBN-13: 978-1632165046
Amazon: All in a Day’s Work
Amazon Kindle: All in a Day’s Work

A guy’s got to make a living. He can do it the conventional way―by selling cars, scooping ice cream, or delivering sandwiches―or he can earn his money as a spy, a historical interpreter, or the host of a myth-busting television show. Whether the men in this anthology are working hard to build their own business or performing in drag at a dance hall, every day has the potential for surprises and the chance to satisfy their lust or maybe find something more permanent. For the guys in these stories, what’s all in a day’s work might be anything but what they expected.

Ice Cream Dreams by Shae Connor
My OTP by Bru Baker
The Bet by Holly O. Hale
Not Quite 1776 by Therese Woodson
Extra Mayo by Henrietta Clarke
Short Timer by Jenni Michaels
Dance Hall Days by Amy Jo Cousins
Unmasked by Kay Walker

2015 Rainbow Awards Guidelines: http://www.elisarolle.com/rainbowawards/rainbow_awards_2015.html

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andrew potter

2015 Rainbow Awards Submission: Aidan's Journey by CJane Elliott

Aidan's Journey (The Serpentine Book 2) by CJane Elliott
Bisexual Contemporary General Fiction
Paperback: 326 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (October 15, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1632162881
ISBN-13: 978-1632162885
Amazon: Aidan's Journey (The Serpentine Book 2)
Amazon Kindle: Aidan's Journey (The Serpentine Book 2)

A Serpentine Series Book

The star of the University of Virginia theater department, Aidan Emery is lusted after and admired for living out and proud. He uses his talent and good looks to his advantage and never sleeps with the same guy twice. But his glamorous patina has been carefully honed to hide the pain he carries inside.

Aidan wasn't always such a player. He starts college naively romantic, hungry for the attention he can’t get from his workaholic father and mentally ill mother. Unfortunately, that leaves him ripe pickings for predatory professor Rodney Montgomery. Rodney’s flattering regard seduces Aidan into a dysfunctional relationship that destroys his innocence.

Life looks up for Aidan when he finally breaks free of Rodney’s pull and moves to New York City to make it as an actor. Meeting sweet fellow actor Patrick Jaymes seems like the start of a fairy tale. But before Aidan can rebuild his life into happily ever after, family secrets rip him wide open, leaving him easy prey when Rodney decides he’s not willing to let Aidan go.

2015 Rainbow Awards Guidelines: http://www.elisarolle.com/rainbowawards/rainbow_awards_2015.html

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