March 2nd, 2017

andrew potter

Alma Lutz (March 2, 1890 – August 31, 1973)

Find A Grave Memorial# 161805972

Alma Lutz was born and brought up in North Dakota, graduated from the Emma Willard School and Vassar College, and attended the Boston University School
of Business Administration. She wrote numerous articles and pamphlets and for many years was a contributor to The Christian Science Monitor. Active in organizations working for the political, civil, and economic rights of women, she was also interested in preserving the records of women's role in history and serves on the Advisory Board of the Radcliffe Women's Archives. Miss Lutz is the author of Emma Willard, Daughter of Democracy (1929), Created Equal, A Biography of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1940), Challenging Years, The Memoirs of Harriot Stanton Blatch, with Harriot Stanton Blatch (1940), the editor of With Love Jane, Letters from American Women on the War Fronts (1945) and the author of Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith, a librarian at the Protestant Zion Research Library in Brookline, Massachussetts, shared their lives from 1918 until the latter's death in 1959. Their lifelong relationship began when they roomed together at Vassar. They shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, N.Y., not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”
Together from 1918 to 1959: 41 years.
Alma Lutz (March 2, 1890 – August 31, 1973)
Marguerite Smith (died in 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Alma Lutz (1890-1973) was the author of “Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian” (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, NY 12022, not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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andrew potter

Dusty Springfield (April 16, 1939 – March 2, 1999)

Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O'Brien OBE, known professionally as Dusty Springfield, was an English pop singer and record producer whose career extended from the late 1950s to the 1990s.
Died: March 2, 1999, Henley-on-Thames, United Kingdom
Lived: 38 Aubrey Walk, Kensington, London W8, UK
85 Westbourne Terrace, London W2 6QS, UK
113 Baker St, Marylebone, London W1U 6RP, UK
Little Hill, Harpsden Bottom, Harpsden, Henley-on-Thames RG9 4HR, UK
Buried: St Mary the Virgin, Hart Street, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, RG9 2AU
Find A Grave Memorial# 7144619
Full name: Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O'Brien

House: Dusty Springfield (1939-1099), singer and gay icon, lived at 38 Aubrey Walk, Kensington, London W8 7JG, from 1966 to 1972. At 85 Westbourne Terrace, London W2 6QS, Dusty Springfield lived in 1965, after leaving her flat at 113 Baker St, Marylebone, London W1U 6RP.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: In the 1990s Dusty Springfield moved to a house beside the River Thames near Henley-on-Thames. While recording a new album she became ill with cancer. Treatment helped for a while but then her health deteriorated badly. Her OBE was collected on her behalf a few weeks before she died at home in 1999.

Address: Harpsden Bottom, Harpsden, Henley-on-Thames RG9 4HR, UK (51.52227, -0.9191)

Life
Who: Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O'Brien OBE (April 16, 1939 – March 2, 1999) aka Dusty Springfield
Dusty Springfield was an English pop singer and record producer whose career extended from the late 1950s to the 1990s. With her distinctive sensual mezzo-soprano sound, she was an important blue-eyed soul singer and at her peak was one of the most successful British female performers, with six top 20 singles on the United States Billboard Hot 100 and sixteen on the United Kingdom Singles Chart from 1963 to 1989. Her image, supported by a peroxide blonde bouffant hairstyle, evening gowns, and heavy make-up, as well as her flamboyant performances made her an icon of the Swinging Sixties. Some of Springfield's biographers and journalists have speculated that she had two personalities: shy, quiet, Mary O'Brien – and the public face she had created as Dusty Springfield. An editorial review at Publishers Weekly of Valentine and Wickham's 2001 biography, “Dancing with Demons,” finds "the confidence [Springfield] exuded on vinyl was a facade masking severe insecurities, addictions to drink and drugs, bouts of self-harm and fear of losing her career if exposed as a lesbian". Springfield was never reported to be in a heterosexual relationship and this meant that the issue of her sexual orientation was raised frequently during her life. From mid-1966 to the early 1970s Springfield lived in a domestic partnership with fellow singer Norma Tanega. In September 1970, Springfield told Ray Connolly of the Evening Standard: “many other people say I'm bent, and I've heard it so many times that I've almost learned to accept it ... I know I'm perfectly as capable of being swayed by a girl as by a boy. More and more people feel that way and I don't see why I shouldn't.” By the standards of 1970, that was a very bold statement. Three years later, she explained to Chris Van Ness of the Los Angeles Free Press: “I mean, people say that I'm gay, gay, gay, gay, gay, gay, gay, gay. I'm not anything. I'm just ... People are people ... I basically want to be straight ... I go from men to women; I don't give a shit. The catchphrase is: I can't love a man. Now, that's my hang-up. To love, to go to bed, fantastic; but to love a man is my prime ambition ... They frighten me.” In the 1970s and 1980s, Springfield became involved in several romantic relationships with women in Canada and the US that were not kept secret from the gay and lesbian community. From late 1972 to 1978, Springfield had an "off and on" domestic relationship with Faye Harris, a US photojournalist. In 1981 she had a six-month love affair with singer-musician Carole Pope of the rock band Rough Trade. In 1982 Springfield met an American actress, Teda Bracci, at an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting – in April 1983 the pair moved in together and seven months later they exchanged vows at a wedding ceremony which was not legally recognised under California law. The pair had a "tempestuous" relationship which led to an altercation with both Springfield and Bracci hospitalised – Springfield had been smashed in the mouth by Bracci wielding a saucepan and had teeth knocked out requiring plastic surgery. The pair had separated within two years. Springfield's funeral service was attended by hundreds of fans and people from the music business, including Elvis Costello, Lulu, and Pet Shop Boys. It was a Catholic funeral, which took place in Oxfordshire, at the ancient parish church of St. Mary the Virgin (Hart Street, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, RG9 2AU), where Springfield had lived during her last years. A marker dedicated to her memory was placed in the church graveyard. Springfield was cremated and some of her ashes were buried at Henley, while the rest were scattered by her brother, Tom Springfield, at the Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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andrew potter

Geraldine Livingston Morgan Thompson (March 2, 1872 – September 9, 1967)

Lived: Brookdale Community College, 805 Newman Springs Rd, Lincroft, NJ 07738 (40.33329, -74.13861)
Sunny Hill Plantation, Florida 32309
Buried: Saint James Episcopal Churchyard, Hyde Park, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 18151545

Miriam Van Waters was a noted early American feminist social worker and served as superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women at Framingham (1932–1957). Van Waters was also a closeted lesbian during this period, and in fact, it was a 'moral panic' against 'prison lesbianism' that almost led to her dismissal as a superintendent in 1949. Geraldine Morgan Thompson met Miriam Van Waters in the mid-1920s; Thompson was the owner of Brookdale, an 800-acre estate in Red Bank, New Jersey. She was the wife of Lewis S. Thompson, who established Sunny Hill Plantation in 1913. Van Waters and Thompson remained together 40 years and Miriam adopted a little girl named Sarah. When Geraldine died on September 9, 1967, she had lived for ninety-five extraordinarily full years, almost half of them as Miriam van Waters' "Dearest Love" and protector. Waters and Thompson remained lovers, and participated in joint social activities like membership of the Audubon Society. As a small, final tribute, Van Waters wrote an obituary for Thompson in the Framingham News.

Together from (around) 1925 to 1967: 42 years.
Miriam Van Waters (October 4, 1887 – January 17, 1974)
Geraldine Livingston Morgan Thompson (March 2, 1872 – September 9, 1967)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: Sunny Hill Plantation (FL 32309) was a large hunting plantation in northern Leon County. It was established by Lewis S. Thompson in 1913, and was created from the former W. G. Ponder Plantation. Just before WWI, Thompson purchased land to the north swelling the plantation to around 20,000 acres (8,100 ha). Lewis' wife, Geraldine Livingston Morgan (1872-1967) co-owned Brookdale Farm, a thoroughbred horse training facility in Lincroft, New Jersey. Today, Sunny Hill is listed as part of the Audubon Society's Important Bird Areas Of Florida as a conservation easement.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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School: Brookdale Community College was founded in July 1967 by the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, who purchased the Brookdale Farm the following year for the purpose of building a community college for residents.

Address: 805 Newman Springs Rd, Lincroft, NJ 07738 (40.33329, -74.13861)
Phone: +1 732-224-2345
Website: http://www.brookdalecc.edu/

Place
The Brookdale Farm was originally the 800-acre property of horseracing enthusiast David Dunham Withers, a New York resident and one of the original investors of Monmouth Park. Withers raised thoroughbred racehorses on his Brookdale Breeding and Stock Farm, and used the property as his weekend and summer home. After Withers died without heirs in 1892, the Brookdale Farm was purchased by William Payne Thompson for $135,000. The land remained within the Thompson family for many years, and much of the original Brookdale Farm’s 800 acres now comprise Middletown’s Thompson Park, Monmouth County’s Thompson Park, Lincroft Elementary School, Marlu Farm, and the Monmouth Museum – in addition to Brookdale’s 220 acres, which the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders purchased from Lewis S. Thompson Jr. in 1968 for the sum of $700,000. Buying the property, remodeling the century-old horse barns into academic classrooms, appointing a board of trustees, formulating and approving a budget, finding a president, developing curriculum, hiring faculty and staff– nearly two years passed since the initial establishment of Brookdale. The College’s first president, the dynamic Dr. Ervin Harlacher, brought solid experience from his prior position as Acting President of Oakland Community College in California and via his role as one of the nation’s first advocates of the “comprehensive, progressive, and most importantly, open to all, community college.” Brookdale opened in September 1969 with 54 full-time faculty, 306 students with an average age under 21, an impressive roster of transfer and career programs, a non-credit “community services” division, an intercollegiate sports program, and later that month an Anti-Vietnam War rally attended by nearly 300 people.

Life
Who: Geraldine Livingston Morgan Thompson (1872 – September 9, 1967) and Miriam Van Waters (October 4, 1887 – January 17, 1974)
Geraldine Thompson was the wife of Lewis S. Thompson, who established Sunny Hill Plantation in 1913. Thompson was a resident of Red Bank, New Jersey. His father was William P. Thompson, an oil man from West Virginia had become treasurer of Standard Oil under John D. Rockefeller. Lewis was a prominent Republican in New Jersey and was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Brookdale, Essex County, N.J. Thompson was also a member in good standing with the Boone and Crockett Club founded by Theodore Roosevelt. Having inherited much of his fortune, Thompson enjoyed outdoor activities of marksmanship, hunting, fishing, and raising dogs. Lewis Thompson died in 1936. Lewis’ wife, Geraldine Livingston Thompson co-owned Brookdale Farm, a thoroughbred horse training facility in Lincroft, New Jersey. Brookdale became Thompson Park in Monmouth County. Mrs. Lewis hosted Ava Alice Muriel Astor as a guest. Miss Astor was the daughter to John Jacob Astor IV who died during the sinking of RMS Titanic in 1912. Mrs. Thompson was also active in Republican politics and was a member of the Republican National Committee from Monmouth County, New Jersey and alternate delegate Republican National Convention from New Jersey in 1940, 1948, and 1952. Her lifelong companion was Miriam Van Waters (1887-1974), a noted early feminist social worker who served as superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women at Framingham (1932–1957.) Van Waters and Thompson remained together 40 years. Geraldine died September 9, 1967 and was buried at St. James’ Churchyard (4526 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park, NY 12538). When Geraldine died, she had lived for ninety-five extraordinarily full years, almost half of them as Miriam van Waters’ "Dearest Love" and protector. As a small, final tribute, Van Waters wrote an obituary for Thompson in the Framingham News. Miriam is buried at Pine Hill Cemetery (Sherborn, MA 01770).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/5054357.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
andrew potter

Horace Walpole (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797)

Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford — also known as Horace Walpole — was an English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.
Born: September 24, 1717, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 2, 1797, Berkeley Square, London, United Kingdom
Education: Eton College
University of Cambridge
Lived: 5 Portland Place, W1B
Strawberry Hill House, 268 Waldegrave Road, Twickenham, Greater London TW1 4ST, UK (51.43825, -0.33456)
Houghton Hall, King’s Lynn, Norfolk PE31 6UE, UK (52.82682, 0.65784)
11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J, UK (51.50973, -0.14522)
5 Arlington Street, SW1A
Buried: St Martin, Houghton Park, Houghton-next-Harpley, Houghton, Norfolk, PE31 6TY
Find A Grave Memorial# 10142
Movies: Castle of Otranto

At ten years old, Horace Walpole was sent to Eton College, where he became part
of the "Quadruple Alliance" of sensitive literary friends, which included Thomas Gray, who was to become the most popular poet of the century, Richard West and Thomas Ashton. Gray was an English poet, letter-writer, classical scholar and professor at Cambridge University. He is widely known for his Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, published in 1751. Walpole and Gray remained friends throughout the latter's life, and Walpole continued to champion his poetry and defend him personally in the many years he survived him. When Walpole decided to go travelling on the “Grand Tour” with Gray, he wrote a will whereby he left Gray all his belongings. In Europe the two had a bitter falling out that took years to put behind them. In later life, Walpole admitted that the fault lay primarily with himself: "to have been inattentive and insensible to the feelings of one I thought below me.”

They met in 1727 and remained friends until Gray’s death in 1771: 44 years.
Horace Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797)
Thomas Gray (December 26, 1716 - July 30, 1771)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 5 Arlington Street, St. James’s, “Sir Robert Walpole (1676–1745), Prime Minister, and his son Horace Walpole (1717–1797), Connoisseur and Man of Letters, lived here"

Address: 11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J 6HE, UK (51.50973, -0.14522)

Place
Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid XVIII century by architect William Kent. The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789. Berkeley Square was laid out in the middle of the XVIII century under Robert Walpole, then Prime Minister. At No. 11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J 6HE, lived his son Horace, from 1779 to 1797; at No. 13 the Marquis of Hertford began to collect what is now the Wallace Collection; at No. 25 lived Charles James Fox; at No. 28 Lord Brougham entertained as Lord Chancellor; at No. 38 Lady Jersey’s dinners and balls were the talk of the town; at No. 45 Lord Clive committed suicide in 1774, and in the corner house on Bruton Street Colly Gibber lived and died. Olive Custance (1874-1944) was born at 12 John St, London WC1N 2EB, the only daughter and heiress of Colonel Frederick Hambleton Custance, who was a wealthy and distinguished soldier in the British army. Whilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses. The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865. The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent’s masterpiece. Gunter’s Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here. 50 Berkeley Square is allegedly haunted; it is currently occupied by Maggs Brothers Antiquarian Booksellers.

Life
Who: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), aka Horace Walpole
Horace Walpole was born in 1717 at 17 Arlington St, St. James's, London SW1A 1RJ, the youngest son of British Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole and his wife Catherine. Sir Robert Walpole (1676–1745) and his son Horace Walpole moved at 5 Arlington St, St. James's, London SW1A 1RA, in 1742. Robert died in 1745, Horave lived there until 1779, where there is a blue plaque to them. Horace Walpole lived for the last fifteen years of his life at No. 11 on the east side of this square, and here he died on the 2nd of March, 1797, a few years after succeeding to the Earldom of Oxford, a title he scarcely ever cared to assume, preferring to be called plain "Horace Walpole" to the end. He thus writes to the Countess of Ossory, under date October, 1779, which fixes the date of his removal hither from Arlington Street, where we have already been introduced to him:—"I came to town this morning to take possession of [my house in] Berkeley Square, and am as well pleased with my new habitation as I can be with anything at present. Lady Shelburne’s being queen of the palace over against me (he is referring, of course, to Lansdowne House) has improved the view since I bought the house, and I trust will make your ladyship not so shy as you were in Arlington Street." Walpole was attacked at Strawberry Hill by the cold, about the close of November, 1796, and at the end of that month he removed to his house in Berkeley Square, which he never left again. On this cold supervened an attack of gout. He still amused himself with writing and dictating brief notes, instead of letters, and with the conversation of his friends; and, exhausted by weakness, sunk gradually and died painlessly, on the 2nd of the following March. On the death of Horace Walpole, the house passed to his niece, Lady Waldegrave, who was living here at the beginning of the XIX century. It has been said of Horace Walpole, with some justice, by Mr. Charles Knight: "The chief value of his letters consists in his lively descriptions of those public events whose nicer details, without such a chronicler, would be altogether hid under the varnish of what we call history."



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Historic District: Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Soul's Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent's Park.

Address: Regent Street, London W1B, UK

Place
• The Langham, London (1C Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1JA) is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium. Since the XIX century the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as “A Scandal in Bohemia” and “The Sign of Four” partly at the Langham. The Langham continued throughout the XX century to be a favoured spot with members of the royal family, such as Diana, Princess of Wales, and many high-profile politicians including Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle. Other guests included Noël Coward, Wallis Simpson, Don Bradman, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, W. Somerset Maugham and Ayumi Hamasaki. Guy Burgess (1911-1963), one of the “Cambridge Five”, a spying ring who fed official secrets to the Soviets during the Cold War, stayed at the Langham while working for the BBC.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) lived in 1743 at 5 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1PW.
• Edward FitzGerald (1809-1883), English writer and translator, lived at 39 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1QQ, in his childhood. He married Lucy, the daughter of the Quaker poet Bernard Barton in Chichester on 4 November 1856, following a death bed promise to Bernard made in 1849 to look after her. The newly married pair went to Brighton, and then settled for a time at 31 Great Portland St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8QG. A few days of married life were enough to disillusionise FitzGerald. The marriage was evidently unhappy, for the couple separated after only a few months, despite having known each other for many years, including collaborating on a book about her father's works in 1849.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) was evicted by his landlords as they had heared that he planned to exhibt "erotic" paintings at 2 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA.
• While Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932) was at Charterhouse, his family moved from Hanwell to a house behind All Souls Church in Langham Place (1 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Restored Gothic castle, once home to Horace Walpole, with a landscaped garden, tours and a cafe.

Address: 268 Waldegrave Road, Twickenham, Greater London TW1 4ST, UK (51.43825, -0.33456)
Hours: Monday through Wednesday 13.30-16.00, Saturday-Sunday 12.00-16.00
Phone: +44 20 8744 1241
Website: http://www.strawberryhillhouse.org.uk/

Place
Horace Walpole rebuilt the existing house in stages starting in 1749, 1760, 1772 and 1776. Strawberry Hill House — often called simply Strawberry Hill — is the Gothic Revival villa that was built in Twickenham, London by Horace Walpole from 1749. It is the type example of the "Strawberry Hill Gothic" style of architecture, and it prefigured the XIX century Gothic revival. Walpole added gothic features such as towers and battlements outside and elaborate decoration inside to create "gloomth" to suit Walpole’s collection of antiquarian objects, contrasting with the more cheerful or "riant" garden. The interior included a Robert Adam fireplace; parts of the exterior were designed by James Essex. The garden contained a large seat shaped like a Rococo sea shell; it has been recreated in the 2012 restoration. The South part of the North East wing was built in 1698 but when the property came into the possession of Horace Walpole in 1747 it was described by him as a cottage. It was converted into a “Gothic” building by him and added to, and nothing of earlier date than his reconstruction is visible outside. Inside the building some of the original chamfered ceiling-beams are exposed and many of the windows contain continental painted glass, mostly of the XVII century. After a £9 million, two-year-long restoration, Strawberry Hill House reopened to the public on Saturday October 2, 2010. In 2013, Strawberry Hill House won the European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage in the Europa Nostra Awards. The Walpole Trust re-opened Strawberry Hill to the public on March 1, 2015. Teddington is a town in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. Historically in the former county of Middlesex, it is on the north bank of the Thames though faces the other way being just after the start of a long meander, between Hampton Wick and the equally affluent area of Strawberry Hill, Twickenham.

Life
Who: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), aka Horace Walpole
At 10 years old, Horace Walpole was sent to Eton College, where he became part of the “Quadruple Alliance” with Thomas Gray (1716-1771), Richard West and Thomas Ashton. Walpole and Gray remained friends throughout the latter’s life, and Walpole continued to champion his poetry and defend him personally in the many years he survived him. When Walpole decided to go travelling on the Grand Tour with Gray, he wrote a will whereby he left Gray all his belongings. In Europe the two had a bitter falling out that took years to put behind them. In later life, Walpole admitted that the fault lay primarily with himself: “to have been inattentive and insensible to the feelings of one I thought below me.” Walpole left his London villa, Strawberry Hill, to Anne Seymour Damer (1749-1828), Mary Berry (1763-1852) and Mary’s sister, Agnes, to live there for all their life. A number of sources have named Damer as being involved in lesbian relationships, particularly relating to her close friendship with Mary Berry, to whom she had been introduced by Horace Walpole in 1789. Mary Berry was the last to survive, and at her death, the 6th earl of Waldegrave, as it was in Horace Walpole’s will, inherited Strawberry Hill, Twickenham (hence the name of Waldegrave Road, which connects Strawberry Hill with Teddington), but his son, George Edward, the 7th earl (1816–1846), was obliged in 1842 to sell the valuable treasures collected there. In 1923 the empty villa was bought by St Mary’s University, Twickenham. In 2007, it was leased to the Strawberry Hill Trust for restoration and eventual opening to the public.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: Houghton Hall is a country house in Norfolk. It is the home of David Cholmondeley, 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley.

Address: 38 Houghton, King's Lynn PE31 6SX, UK (52.82682, 0.65784)
Phone: +44 1485 528569
Website: http://www.houghtonhall.com/
English Heritage Building ID: 221600 (Grade I, 1953)

Place
Built in the XVIII century, Design by James Gibbs (1682-1754)
It was built for the de facto first British Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, and it is a key building in the history of Palladian architecture in England. It is surrounded by 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of parkland adjacent to Sandringham House. The house has a rectangular main block which consists of a rustic basement at ground level, with a piano nobile, bedroom floor and attics above. There are also two lower flanking wings joined to the main block by colonnades. To the south of the house there is a detached quadrangular stable block. The exterior is both grand and restrained, constructed of fine-grained, silver-white stone. The Gibbs-designed domes punctuate each corner. In line with Palladian conventions, the interiors are much more colourful, exuberant and opulent than the exteriors. The parklands surrounding Houghton was redesigned in the XVIII century by Charles Bridgeman. In the process, the village of Houghton was demolished and rebuilt outside the park, with the exception of the medieval parish church, which was heavily restored. This new building was placed on the site of earlier Walpole family houses.

Life
Who: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), aka Horace Walpole
Sir Robert Walpole became the 1st Earl of Orford in 1742. Ownership of Houghton Hall passed to his son and grandson, the 2nd and 3rd earls. On the death of the 3rd earl it reverted to his uncle the 4th Earl of Orford, better known as Horace Walpole. On his death in 1797, possession passed to the family of his sister, Lady Cholmondeley, who died at just 26 years in 1731, more than 65 years before. Sir Robert Walpole’s daughter, Mary, had married George Cholmondeley, 3rd Earl of Cholmondeley and Houghton Hall was modified and maintained by her Cholmondeley family across a further span of generations. Colonel Robert Walpole borrowed a book about the Archbishop of Bremen from the Sidney Sussex College library in 1667 or 1668. The overdue library book was discovered at Houghton in the mid-1950s, and returned 288 years later. The house has remained largely untouched, having remained "unimproved" despite the Victorian passion for remodelling and redecorating. Houghton still belongs to the Marquess of Cholmondeley, and parts of the structure and grounds are opened to the public throughout the year. Horace Walpole is buried at St Martin (Houghton Park, Houghton-next-Harpley, Houghton, Norfolk, PE31 6TY), in the Walpole family vault.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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andrew potter

John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934)

John Gray was an English poet whose works include Silverpoints, The Long Road and Park: A Fantastic Story. It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde's fictional Dorian Gray.
Born: March 2, 1866, London, United Kingdom
Died: June 14, 1934, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Lived: St. Peter’s Church, 77 Falcon Avenue, Edinburgh EH10 4AN, UK (55.93024, -3.20693)
2 Vivian Road, Bethnal Green
96 Eglinton Road, Woolwich
43 Park Lane, W1K
Buried: Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, City of Edinburgh, Scotland
Find A Grave Memorial# 139613013
People also search for: Ian Fletcher, Allan Walter Campbell, Aubrey Beardsley

John Gray was an English poet whose works include Silverpoints, The Long Road and Park: A Fantastic Story. It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde's fictional Dorian Gray. Gray's life partner was Marc-Andre Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. On November 28, 1898, at the age of 32, Gray entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran ordained him on December 21, 1901. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh, Raffalovich settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter's Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich's sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael's nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness. The critic, Valentine Cunningham, has described Gray as the "stereotypical poet of the nineties“.

Together from 1896 to 1934: 38 years.
John Gray (March 9, 1866 – June 14, 1934)
Marc-Andre Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: John Gray (1866-1934) was born at 2 Vivian Rd, London E3 5RF, a working-class area in the East End of London, "Mean streets of semi-detached houses of dull uniformity." Most of the inhabitants, so it seems, were industrious, provident, house-proud, typical altogether of the superior artisan class. A few years later the family moved to 96 Eglinton Rd, Woolwich, London SE18 3SY. His father, another John Gray, was successively a wheelwright in Woolwich Dockyard and inspector of stores at Woolwich Arsenal.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: In 1882, aged eighteen, Marc André Raffalovich (1864-1934) moved to London with his governess, Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (c.1842-1930), with the intention of studying at the University of Oxford. Instead, he settled at 72 S Audley St, Mayfair, London W1K 1JB, with the intention of setting up a salon. Unlike his mother, he was not entirely successful. It was during his time in London that he was introduced to the poet and writer John Gray, through Arthur William Symons (1865–1945), literary scholar and author. They were to remain close friends and companions throughout the next forty years, dying within months of each other.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: 43 Park Ln, Mayfair, London W1K 1PN, was home to John Gray (1866–1934) from 1893 to 1898.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: Marc-André Raffalovich (1864-1934) stayed at 11 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2BP, from 1898 to 1905 and John Gray spent his holidays there while whilst studying for the priesthood.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: In Whitehouse Terrace, Marc-André Raffalovich established a successful salon. His guests included Henry James, Lady Margaret Sackville, Compton Mackenzie, Max Beerbohm and Herbert Read.

Address: 9 Whitehouse Terrace, Edinburgh EH9 2EU, UK (55.93111, -3.19378)
Historic Scotland Building ID: 30678 (Grade B, 1993)

Place
While John Gray studied in Rome, Marc-André Raffalovich and Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (the daughter of a Scottish bank manager and Marc-André’s former governess) spent part of each year in Edinburgh, and in 1905, they moved to Morningside, to 9 Whitehouse Terrace, where Raffalovich’s longed-for salon was finally established. “A place of intellectualism and faded decandence,” according to John Kemplay. For 25 years, until Miss Gribbell’s death in 1930, Raffalovich’s Sunday luncheon and Tuesday dinner parties were established features of the city’s social life. His home was last on the market in 2013 and sold for £2,800,000.

Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Marc-André Raffalovich was a French poet and writer on homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray. Marc-André went up to study in Oxford in 1882 before settling down in London and opening a salon in the 1890s. Oscar Wilde attended, calling the event a saloon rather than a salon. This is where Raffalovich met the love and companion of his life, John Gray. In 1890, his sister Sophie married the Irish nationalist politician William O’Brien (1852–1928.) In 1896, under the influence of John Gray, Raffalovich embraced Catholicism and joined the tertiary order of the Dominicans as Brother Sebastian in honour of Saint Sebastian. At the same time Gray was ordained a priest. In 1905, Gray was appointed to the parish of St Patrick in the working class Cowgate area of Edinburgh. Raffalovich followed and settled down nearby, purchasing No. 9, Whitehouse Terrace. He contributed greatly to the cost of St Peter’s Church in Morningside, Edinburgh, of which Gray was appointed the first parish priest.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Church: St. Peter’s, Falcon Avenue, is a church that gives a remarkable experience of spaciousness for a relative small interior.

Address: 77 Falcon Avenue, Edinburgh EH10 4AN, UK (55.93024, -3.20693)
Phone:+44 131 447 2502
Website: http://www.stpetersrcchurchedinburgh.org.uk/
Historic Scotland Building ID: 27257 (Grade A, 1970)

Place
Built in 1905, Design by Sir Robert Lorimer (1864-1929)
The church was opened on 25 April 1907. The idea was conceived by Fr. John Gray, at the time curate at St. Patrick’s Church (40 High St, Old Town, Edinburgh EH1 1TQ), together with Marc-André Raffalovitch. On a painting inside the church, an angel with raised and partially spread wings and head bowed to right shoulder is holding a model of the Presbytery, whilst kneeling on left leg on what appears to be a coiled serpent. A large flowering plant rises vertically on the angel’s right from a two-handled vase. The work is housed in a stepped niche. In 1906, John Gray was appointed the first parish priest of St. Peter’s church in Edinburgh, which was a huge change of professional environment for him – from shabby Cowgate to affluent Morningside. His friend Raffalovich financed the building of the church in Falcon Avenue, completed in 1907. John Duncan was commissioned to paint the Stations of the Cross for the church, and was often among the guests at Raffalovich’s parties. The paintings were sold around 1965 and their present whereabouts is unknown. One visitor to the church buildings in Falcon Avenue later remembered: “The whole house was in a dim, mysterious, and elusive twilight. It was a world of half-tones: in fact it only needed an invisible gramophone playing Debussy or bits from Maeterlinck to make it quite perfect. To think of “Pellèas et Mèlisande” or “Le Cathèdrale englouti” is to capture the impression of St. Peter’s presbytery – and its creator.” Anson, 1963.

Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
John Gray was a poet whose works include “Silverpoints,” “The Long Road” and “Park: A Fantastic Story.” Gray is best known today as an aesthetic poet of the 1890s and as a friend of Ernest Dowson, Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde. He was also a talented translator, bringing works by the French Symbolists Stéphane Mallarmé, Paul Verlaine, Jules Laforgue and Arthur Rimbaud into English, often for the first time. He is purported to be the inspiration behind the title character in Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” but distanced himself from this rumour. In fact, Wilde’s story was serialised in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine a year before their relationship began. His relationship with Wilde was initially intense, but had cooled for over two years by the time of Wilde’s imprisonment. The relationship appears to have been at its height in the period 1891-1893. In 1882 he passed the Civil Service exams and, five years later, the University of London matriculation exams. He joined the Foreign Office where he became a librarian. He left his position at the Foreign Office on 28 November 1898, at the age of 32, and he entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. He was ordained by Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran on 21 December 1901. He served as a priest in Edinburgh, first at Saint Patrick’s and then as rector at Saint Peter’s. John Gray was to become a close friend of the “Michael Fields” – Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper. His most important supporter, and life partner, was Marc-André Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh he settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter’s Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. In 1930, Gray was installed as canon in St. Mary’s cathedral (35 Manor Pl, Edinburgh EH3 7EB). The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich’s sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael’s nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Cemetery: The Archdiocese of St Andrews & Edinburgh acquired the land in 1895 and it became Mount Vernon Cemetery. The first burial was in 1895.

Address: 49 Mount Vernon Rd, Edinburgh EH16 6JG, UK (55.91498, -3.1576)
Phone: +44 131 664 3064

Place
The land now known as Mount Vernon Cemetery was previously known as the “Lands of Nellfield” and in 1827 was renamed by the then owners as “Mount Vernon”.

Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Given his close and intense friendship with Canon John Gray, Raffalovich is buried as close as possible to him. His tombstone reads: IN PEACE + MARC ANDRE SEBASTIAN RAFFALOVICH 11TH SEPTEMBER 1864 + 14TH FEBRUARY 1934. John Gray is probably buried in the Priests' Circle as he was the founder and first priest of St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church, Falcon Road.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Nan Mason (July 17, 1896 – March 2, 1982)

Lived: Bearsville, New York
Buried: Artists Cemetery, Woodstock, Ulster County, New York, USA
Buried alongside: Wilna Hervey
Find A Grave Memorial# 143629972

Wilna Hervey and Nan Mason were artists, actresses and occasional house painters, staying together for 59 years. Known to friends and family as "Willie," Wilna Hervey grew up in affluent circumstances at Beach Ninth Street, Far Rockaway. 6’3” Wilna found some success in silent films, playing rugged mountain girls and other hardy characters. In 1919, she was cast in the role of The Powerful Katrinka in The Toonerville Trolley silent film series based on Fontaine Fox's Toonerville Folks comic strip. While Hervey was in Pennsylvania working on the production, she met the painter Nan Mason, the daughter of her co-star Dan Mason, who played the Skipper. Nan and Hervey became life partners, remaining together until Hervey's death in 1979. Wilna studied art with Winold Reiss, and Nan performed music for Edward Weston and Johan Hagemeyer. Around 1919-1920, Hervey's father bought her a studio in Bearsville, New York. She and Nan Mason split their time between painting and farming in Woodstock, New York, and pursuing acting opportunities in California, from 1922 to 1929. They became popular members of the Woodstock artists’ community, and both found some artistic success there during the 1960s. During the harsh New York winters, they also spent time in Carmel, California and Manatee County, Florida.

Together from 1920 to 1979: 59 years.
Nan Mason (1896-1982)
Wilna Hervey (October 3, 1894 – March 6, 1979)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cemetery: The town has long been a mecca for artists, musicians, and writers, even before the music festival made the name "Woodstock" famous. The town has a separate "Artist's Cemetery". Film and art festivals attract big names, and hundreds of musicians have come to Woodstock to record.

Address: 12 Mountainview Ave, Woodstock, NY 12498, USA (42.04325, -74.12007)
Phone: +1 845-679-2713
Website: www.woodstockartistscemetery.org

Place
The first non-indigenous settler arrived around 1770. The Town of Woodstock was established in 1787. Later, Woodstock contributed some of its territory to form the towns of Middletown (1789), Windham (1798), Shandaken (1804), and Olive (1853). Woodstock played host to numerous Hudson River School painters during the late 1800s. The Arts and Crafts Movement came to Woodstock in 1902, with the arrival of Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead, Bolton Brown and Hervey White, who formed the Byrdcliffe Colony. In 1906, L. Birge Harrison and others founded the Summer School of the Art Students League of New York in the area, primarily for landscape painting. Ever since, Woodstock has been considered an active artists colony. From 1915 through 1931, Hervey White's Maverick Art Colony held the Maverick Festivals, "in which hundreds of free spirits gathered each summer for music, art, theater and drunken orgies in the woods."A series of Woodstock Sound-Outs were staged at Pan Copeland's Farm just over the town line in Saugerties from 1967 to 1970. These featured folk and rock acts like Richie Havens, Paul Butterfield, Dave van Ronk and Van Morrison and were identified with Woodstock's reputation as a summer arts colony. The Sound-Outs inspired the original Woodstock Festival's organizers to plan their concert at the Winston Farm in Saugerties; however, the town turned down their permit, and the "Woodstock" Festival was actually held almost 60 miles (97 km) away at Max Yasgur's Farm in the Sullivan County town of Bethel. Woodstock is also home to the Karma Triyana Dharmachakra Buddhist monastery, situated at the top of Mead's Mountain Road.

Life
Who: Wilna "Willie" Hervey (October 3, 1894 – March 6, 1979) and Nan Mason (July 17, 1896 – March 2, 1982).
Nan Mason was a member of the Woodstock Artist Colony but spent time in Carmel, California as well. As a painter, she was surrounded by her contemporaries and learned well from their interactions. Nan rests beside her partner of 59 years, Wilna Hervey, actress and Artist. Hervey appeared in a number of silent films, most notably the "Toonerville Trolley" comedies made by the Betzwood Film Company in Pennsylvania in 1920. At 6'3" and weighing nearly 300 pounds, she was perfect in the role of "Powerful Katrinka," one of the most popular characters of the "Toonerville" film series.She came from a very wealthy family and when her movie career ended in 1922, she purchased a farm in Bearsville, NY 12409, near Woodstock and lived there with her life partner, Nan Mason, for most of the rest of her life. As an artist, Wilna Hervey is best remembered for tiny exquisite enamel paintings done in a technique she pioneered. "I'm a big woman, but I want my pictures to be small," she was fond of saying. Her partner, Nan Mason concentrated on painting and photography. Both "Willie" and Nan became beloved members of the artists community that was centered in Woodstock. Well known for their eccentricities, their generosity, and the wild parties they threw, Wilna Hervey and Nan Mason are still fondly remembered in Woodstock today.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Norman St John-Stevas (May 18, 1929 - March 2, 2012)

Born: May 18, 1929, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 2, 2012, London, United Kingdom
Education: Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge,
Christ Church, Oxford
Yale University
Lived: Old Rectory, Preston Capes
34 Montpelier Square, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1JY
Find A Grave Memorial# 86311243
Party: Conservative Party
Books: Obscenity and the law, The two cities, more
TV shows: BBC-3

House: Norman St John-Stevas (1929–2012) loved beautiful places – Venice and Rome were particular favourites – and attractive things. His Knightsbridge house at 34 Montpelier Square, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1JY, contained a large collection of Victoriana. Visitors were sometimes astonished to call on him in late morning and be welcomed by St John-Stevas in an imperial purple dressing gown. He died in March 2012 from undisclosed causes, aged 82. His homosexuality was summarised by Simon Hoggart in The Guardian obituary note: "He lived in that period where gay politicians never came "out", yet were happy for everyone to know. He lived life as a camp performance."



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) was a British politician, author, and barrister. St John-Stevas stood down from the House of Commons at the 1987 general election, being created a life peer in the House of Lords with the title Baron St John of Fawsley of Preston Capes in the County of Northamptonshire in 1987. A loyal monarchist, Lord St John enjoyed a close relationship with the British Royal Family. Soon after his elevation to the Lords, photographs of him in purple bedroom slippers appeared in Hello! magazine while he lounged in the bedroom of his Northampton rectory with a signed photograph of Princess Margaret prominently displayed. The Old Rectory, Preston Capes (1 Church Way, Preston Capes, Daventry NN11 3TE, English Heritage Building ID: 360597 (Grade II, 1987)) is a former rectory. Early XVIII century with earlier origins and large XIX century additions. Coursed ironstone rubble, red brick, hipped slate roofs, various brick lateral, ridge and end stacks. 2 storeys and attic. Stone-built core has two 3-light leaded casement windows with timber lintels to ground and first floors to front facing village and a small roof dormer. A part-glazed plank door to right side. Another stone range projects right towards rear of right side with a glazed door immediately to right but largely hidden by slightly lower early XIX century brick front range with 3-light leaded casement windows with pointed arch heads and hood moulds, to ground and first floors. Right end of 2nd stone wing facing garden has a 4-light painted stone arch-mullion window to ground floor, an early XIX century brick porch with panelled door and fanlight to right and similar 3-light window to first floor. Behind this wing and facing garden a large early XIX century brick range of 3 windows with 15-pane sashes and segmental heads. Other sash windows of 12-panes, leaded wood mullion and transom windows and casement windows to rear and side facing churchyard. St John-Stevas’s partner of over fifty years was Adrian Stanford. They met each other in 1956 at Oxford, where Lord St John taught Stanford law. They entered into a civil partnership shortly before Lord St John's death in order to avoid paying inheritance tax, which would have taxed 40% of his £3.3 million estate.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Renata Borgatti (March 2, 1894 – March 8, 1964)

Renata Borgatti was an Italian classical musician, performing in Europe and the United States.
Born: March 2, 1894, Bologna
Died: March 8, 1964, Rome
Buried: Cimitero di Palestrina, Palestrina, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 161024877

Renata Borgatti was an Italian classical musician, performing in Europe and the United States. She settled in Capri in the early 1900s, where her lifestyle raised fewer eyebrows than elsewhere in Europe. In 1918, she entered into a lesbian affair with Italian socialite, and baroness, Mimì Franchetti. The two remained together for just over a year, until Franchetti left Capri and linked with the prominent American artist Romaine Brooks. Borgatti had an affair with Faith Stone, whose husband Sir Compton Mackenzie wrote the satirical roman à clef Extraordinary Women, about a group
of lesbians arriving on the island of Sirene, a fictional version of Capri. In 1920, she herself began a liaison with Brooks, who was by that time pursuing a relationship with the American writer Natalie Clifford Barney. Borgatti's affair with Brooks proceeded on and off for at least three years, but was curtailed when Brooks began avoiding her. During the early-1920s, she became intimately involved with Winnaretta Singer (who previously was as well involved with Brooks), heiress to the Singer sewing machine fortune.

Together from 1920 to 1923: 3 years.
Renata Borgatti (March 2, 1894 – March 8, 1964)
Romaine Brooks, born Beatrice Romaine Goddard (May 1, 1874 – December 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cemetery: Renata Borgatti (1894-1964) is buried in the Palestrina cemetery (Via Santa Maria, 00036 Palestrina RM). Renata Borgatti was an Italian classical musician, performing in Europe and the United States. A lesbian, she settled on the Mediterranean island of Capri in the early 1900s, where her lifestyle raised fewer eyebrows than elsewhere in Europe. In 1918, she entered into a lesbian affair with an Italian socialite (and baroness) Mimì Franchetti. The two remained together for just over a year, until Franchetti left Capri and linked with the prominent American artist Romaine Brooks. Borgatti had an affair with Faith Mackenzie, whose husband Compton Mackenzie wrote of the island's lesbian residents in the 1928 satirical roman à clef “Extraordinary Women,” about a group of lesbians arriving on the island of Sirene, a fictional version of Capri. In 1920, Borgatti left Capri to pursue her career on the European mainland. She also began a romantic liaison with Brooks, who was by that time pursuing a relationship with the American writer Natalie Barney. Borgatti's affair with Brooks proceeded on and off for at least three years, but was curtailed when Brooks began avoiding her. During the early-1920s, she became intimately involved with Winnaretta Singer, heiress to the Singer sewing machine fortune. She performed on stage with the violinist Olga Rudge during this period. They worked frequently together, despite the presence of Rudge's lover, the famous poet Ezra Pound, who was then working as a music critic and was not impressed by Borgatti's playing.

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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