elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Rick Elice & Roger Rees

Eric "Rick" Elice (born November 17, 1956) is a writer and former stage actor. His partner is actor Roger Rees.

Elice earned his BA from Cornell University, his MFA from the Yale Drama School and is a Teaching Fellow at Harvard. He was the salutatorian graduate of Francis Lewis High School in Queens, New York (class of 1973). He is a charter member of the American Repertory Theatre. From 1982-1999, Elice was copywriter, producer, Creative Director and eventually Executive Vice President of Serino Coyne, Inc., an entertainment advertising agency in New York. From 1999-2009, he served as creative consultant to Walt Disney Studios.

Rick Elice with Marshall Brickman wrote the book for the Broadway musical Jersey Boys which received a Tony Award nomination and a Drama Desk nomination for best book for a musical in 2006. With Roger Rees, he wrote the popular thriller, Double Double, which has been translated into 16 languages.

He wrote Leonardo’s Ring (London Fringe, 2003) and Dog and Pony (New York Stage and Film, 2003). Elice was creative director at Serino Coyne, Inc. (1982–2000), where he produced advertising campaigns for more than 300 Broadway shows including A Chorus Line and The Lion King. He has been a creative consultant for Walt Disney Studios since 2000.


In 1982, Rick Elice was working at an ad agency, and one of his clients was "Cats," directed by Trevor Nunn. At the dress rehearsal, he spotted Roger Rees in the audience. He waited outside the stage door to introduce himself. "Standing before me was a six-foot-four, extraordinarily handsome American in a Burberry raincoat," Rees recalled. "It was the raincoat that did it." Rees was flying to London in two days, to star in Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing." Did he have time for dinner before then? He did.

In 2008, he co-wrote Turn of the Century with Marshall Brickman. The show was directed by Tommy Tune and premiered at The Goodman Theatre in Chicago in September 2008.

Elice most recently collaborated with Brickman once again, this time writing the book for the musical, The Addams Family. Following a successful run at the Ford Center for the Performing Arts Oriental Theatre in Chicago, The Addams Family opened on Broadway on April 8, 2010 at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, starring Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth as Gomez and Morticia Addams.

He wrote Peter and the Starcatcher, based on the 2006 novel of the same name by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson, which opened in California in 2009 and played off-Broadway in 2011. The play moved to Broadway, opening at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on April 15, 2012. "Peter and the Starcatcher" received 9 Tony Award nominations, more than any new American play in the history of the Tony Awards. On June 11, 2012, the play won 5 Tony Awards.

In 1981, Trevor Nunn’s mammoth eight-and-a-half-hour production of “The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby” came to New York. Rick Elice was incensed: “I went to Equity and said, ‘I would like to start a committee to keep British actors out of Broadway.’ ” (“British Out of Broadway would be BOOB,” Rees added.) Elice went to see the play anyway. From the nosebleeds, he noticed a “devastatingly beautiful” actor milling around before the show. Turns out it was the guy playing Nicholas Nickleby. Enraptured, Elice wrote a letter that night on yellow legal paper, inviting Rees to come see him do a tap number at a benefit. He dropped it off at the theatre the next day. No response.

In 1982, Elice was working at an ad agency, and one of his clients was “Cats,” also directed by Nunn. At the dress rehearsal, he spotted Rees in the audience. He waited outside the stage door to introduce himself. “Standing before me was a six-foot-four, extraordinarily handsome American in a Burberry raincoat,” Rees recalled. “It was the raincoat that did it.” Rees was flying to London in two days, to star in Tom Stoppard’s “The Real Thing.” Did he have time for dinner before then?

The next night, Elice prepared pigeon en croûte at his apartment, on West Fifty-seventh Street (Rees: “The croûte was bigger than the apartment”). They talked until three in the morning, then Rees got in a car to J.F.K. He told Elice, “Maybe you’ll come over and see me in ‘The Real Thing.’ ”

On June 24th, 2011, the New York State Senate voted to legalize gay marriage. Elice: “Roger came home from ‘The Addams Family’ that night and said, ‘Do you want to get married?’ I said, ‘I don’t know—it seems like a big step!’ ”

“I can’t believe you said that.”

“The next day, I was walking by the dog park over by the Planetarium, and I realized I had pissed on this very sweet moment. So when he came home that night I said, ‘Yeah, by all means, let’s do this.’ ” August: they got married at the City Clerk’s Office. Afterward: pancakes at Bubby’s. (http://www.newyorker.com/talk/2012/06/04/120604ta_talk_schulman)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Elice

Roger Rees (born 5 May 1944) is a Welsh actor. He is best known to American audiences for playing the characters Robin Colcord on the American television sitcom show Cheers and Lord John Marbury on the American television drama The West Wing. He won a Tony Award for his performance as the lead in The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby. Rees married his long-term partner, writer/producer Rick Elice, in 2011. Rees and Elice have also collaborated professionally, most notably as co-playwrights of the comedic thriller Double Double. Elice is also the co-author (with Marshall Brickman) of the book of the Addams Family musical, the cast of which Rees had joined on 22 March 2011.

In 1981, Trevor Nunn’s mammoth eight-and-a-half-hour production of “The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby” came to New York. Rick Elice was incensed: “I went to Equity and said, ‘I would like to start a committee to keep British actors out of Broadway.’ ” (“British Out of Broadway would be BOOB,” Rees added.) Elice went to see the play anyway. From the nosebleeds, he noticed a “devastatingly beautiful” actor milling around before the show. Turns out it was the guy playing Nicholas Nickleby. Enraptured, Elice wrote a letter that night on yellow legal paper, inviting Rees to come see him do a tap number at a benefit. He dropped it off at the theatre the next day. No response.

In 1982, Elice was working at an ad agency, and one of his clients was “Cats,” also directed by Nunn. At the dress rehearsal, he spotted Rees in the audience. He waited outside the stage door to introduce himself. “Standing before me was a six-foot-four, extraordinarily handsome American in a Burberry raincoat,” Rees recalled. “It was the raincoat that did it.” Rees was flying to London in two days, to star in Tom Stoppard’s “The Real Thing.” Did he have time for dinner before then?

The next night, Elice prepared pigeon en croûte at his apartment, on West Fifty-seventh Street (Rees: “The croûte was bigger than the apartment”). They talked until three in the morning, then Rees got in a car to J.F.K. He told Elice, “Maybe you’ll come over and see me in ‘The Real Thing.’ ”

On June 24th, 2011, the New York State Senate voted to legalize gay marriage. Elice: “Roger came home from ‘The Addams Family’ that night and said, ‘Do you want to get married?’ I said, ‘I don’t know—it seems like a big step!’ ”

“I can’t believe you said that.”

“The next day, I was walking by the dog park over by the Planetarium, and I realized I had pissed on this very sweet moment. So when he came home that night I said, ‘Yeah, by all means, let’s do this.’ ” August: they got married at the City Clerk’s Office. Afterward: pancakes at Bubby’s. (http://www.newyorker.com/talk/2012/06/04/120604ta_talk_schulman)

Rees was born in Aberystwyth, Wales, the son of Doris Louise (née Smith), a shop clerk, and William John Rees, a police officer.

Rees started his career with the Royal Shakespeare Company and attended the Slade School of Fine Arts. He played Malcolm in the acclaimed Trevor Nunn 1976 stage and 1978 television production of Macbeth. Rees created the title role in the original production of the play The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, winning both an Olivier Award and a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play in 1982. He also starred in the original production of The Real Thing by Tom Stoppard in London in 1984.

Rees began to work in television during the 1970s, appearing opposite Laurence Olivier in The Ebony Tower (1984). From 1988 to 1991 he starred in the late 80s/early 90s British sitcom Singles, with actress and co-star Judy Loe. From 1989 to 1991 and in 1993, he also appeared intermittently on the long-running American TV series Cheers as the English tycoon Robin Colcord. Later television appearances include My So-Called Life as substitute teacher Mr Racine, British Ambassador Lord John Marbury on The West Wing and James MacPherson on Warehouse 13.

His film career beginning in the 1980s, Rees played the Sheriff of Rottingham in Mel Brooks' 1993 film, Robin Hood: Men in Tights. More recent film appearances include Frida (2002) and The Prestige (2006).

Continuing his work in the theatre through the 1990s, both as an actor and a director, Rees was awarded an Obie award for his 1992 performance in the off-Broadway play The End of the Day. In 1995 he was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for his role in Indiscretions. That same year, he also participated as narrator for the audiobook edition of Memnoch the Devil by Anne Rice. As for audiobooks, Roger has performed in a wide variety of programs.

In November 2004, Rees was named artistic director of the Williamstown Theatre Festival, only the fourth person to hold the post in its half century history. He left the position in October 2007.

In October 2010, it was announced that on 22 March, he was to portray the role of Gomez in the Broadway musical adaptation of The Addams Family, following the departure of Nathan Lane. On 19 September, it was announced that Rees extended his run in the show through closing on 31 December 2011.

Rees became a naturalized United States citizen in 1989.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Rees

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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