elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

John Moffat & Larry Lillo

After two years as Artistic Director at The Grand Theatre in London, Ontario, Larry Lillo (September 20, 1946 - June 2, 1993) returned to Vancouver as the Playhouse’s 10th Artistic Director. Mr. Lillo, a co-founder of Tamahnous Theatre, was the golden boy of Vancouver theatre, and his return to helm the Playhouse at a critical time in the company’s history, was hailed.

He was born September 20, 1946 in Kinuso, a tiny village in Alberta northwest of Edmonton. He attended Royal Roads Military College, Nova Scotia, earned a BA at St. Francis Xavier. He studied at U. of Washington, then in New York City, later received an MA at UBC in directing. Lillo was the co-founder and a director and actor with Tamahnous Theatre from 1971 to 1981, a freelance theatre director, 1981-85, and artistic director of the Grand Theatre in London, Ont. in 1986. In 1988 he became artistic director of the Vancouver Playhouse (1988). Under his leadership, Playhouse subscriptions rose from 5,800 (1988) to nearly 12,000 (1992/93). He won a Jessie (Vancouver) and a Dora (Toronto) for his direction of Sam Shepard’s play A Lie of the Mind, which was at the Playhouse from October 4 to November 5, 1988. Lillo directed and developed many new Canadian plays. His partner, John Moffat  (1956 - May 16, 1995), was an award-winning actor.

Larry Lillo brought his populist approach to theatre to the forefront in his very first production, Sam Shepherd’s A Lie of the Mind, which earned him the first of three consecutive Jessie Awards for Directing. Over the next five seasons, Mr. Lillo created playbills that brought a renewed sense of excitement to the Playhouse stage. He directed stunning productions of new Canadian hits such as John Gray’s Rock and Rolland Health, the Musical, while bringing new vision to classics such as Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit and A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams.


John Moffat, AIDS Quilt
Larry Lillo (September 20, 1946 - June 2, 1993), a co-founder of Tamahnous Theatre, was the golden boy of Vancouver theatre, and his return to helm the Playhouse at a critical time in the company’s history, was hailed. His partner, John Moffat  (1956 - May 16, 1995), was an award-winning actor. THE JOHN MOFFAT & LARRY LILLO AWARD is an annual Award, intended to assist mature Canadian West Coast theatre artists to further their artistic development.


His 1992 production of Macbeth provided the backdrop for Michelle Bjornson’s award-winning documentary It Shall Not Last the Night: The Theatre of Larry Lillo, which narrated his struggle with AIDS.

Larry Lillo passed away on June 2, 1993, just four days before the final production of the 1992/93 season, Private Lives, closed.

THE JOHN MOFFAT & LARRY LILLO AWARD is an annual Award, intended to assist mature Canadian West Coast theatre artists to further their artistic development.

Source: http://playhouse50.wordpress.com/tag/larry-lillo/

Further Readings:

Beyond Shame: Reclaiming the Abandoned History of Radical Gay Sexuality by Patrick Moore
Paperback: 264 pages
Publisher: Beacon Press (January 14, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 080707957X
ISBN-13: 978-0807079577
Amazon: Beyond Shame: Reclaiming the Abandoned History of Radical Gay Sexuality

The radical sexuality of gay American men in the 1970s is often seen as a shameful period of excess that led to the AIDS crisis. Beyond Shame claims that when the gay community divorced itself from this allegedly tainted legacy, the tragic result was an intergenerational disconnect because the original participants were unable to pass on a sense of pride and identity to younger generations. Indeed, one reason for the current rise in HIV, Moore argues, is precisely due to this destructive occurrence, which increased the willingness of younger gay men to engage in unsafe sex.

Lifting the'veil of AIDS,' Moore recasts the gay male sexual culture of the 1970s as both groundbreaking and creative-provocatively comparing extreme sex to art. He presents a powerful yet nuanced snapshot of a maligned, forgotten era. Moore rescues gay America's past, present, and future from a disturbing spiral of destruction and AIDS-related shame, illustrating why it's critical for the gay community to reclaim the decade.


More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance



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Tags: days of love tb, director: larry lillo
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