elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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elisa_rolle

Dale Peck & Lou Peralta

Dale Peck (born 1967 on Long Island, New York) is an American novelist, critic, and columnist. His 2009 novel, Sprout, won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children's/Young Adult literature, and was a finalist for the Stonewall Book Award in the Children's and Young Adult Literature category. Peck lives in New York City with his husband, Lou Peralta, where he teaches in the Graduate Writing Program of the New School. The dedica of Shift is: "To my husband, Lou Peralta, for his unwavering love and support during the writing of this book"

Dale Peck was born on Long Island in 1967, moved to Kansas when he was seven, then returned to the East Coast to attend college at Drew University.

In 1993, he published his first novel, Martin and John, which the New York Times called “a brilliant debut.” Two more novels followed: The Law of Enclosures (1996), which was adapted into a feature film by John Greyson starring Sarah Polley and Diane Ladd, and Now It’s Time to Say Goodbye (1998), which prompted Michiko Kakutani of the Times to write: “All of thirty years old, Mr. Peck has more than fulfilled the promise of his first two novels: he has taken on the same big themes Toni Morrison tried with less success to address in Paradise…and delivered a novel commensurate with his ambitions.”


Dale Peck is a novelist, critic, and columnist. His 2009 novel, Sprout, won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children's/Young Adult literature, and was a finalist for the Stonewall Book Award in the Children's and Young Adult Literature category. Peck lives in New York City with his husband, Lou Peralta, where he teaches in the Graduate Writing Program of the New School. The dedica of Shift is: "To my husband, Lou Peralta, for his unwavering love and support during the writing of this book"

Five years later, Peck published a memoir-cum-novel, What We Lost (2003), which was, however, overshadowed by the attention bestowed on his book of literary criticism, Hatchet Jobs, and its most notorious review, that of Rick Moody’s The Black Veil. Its famous first line became the subject of thousands of reviews, blog entries, and a profile in the New York Times Magazine, as well as a good old-fashioned bitch slapping and one (slightly sour) pie in the face. Since then, Peck has published two novels for children, Drift House (2005) and The Lost Cities (2007), one young adult novel, Sprout (2009), and a literary thriller, Body Surfing, (2009).

The Garden of Lost and Found, which was to have been published in 2007 by Carrol and Graf before that company was bought and dissolved by Perseus Books, is currently on hold while Peck finishes the trilogy The Gate of Orpheus, which he is co-authoring with Tim Kring, the creator of Heroes.

Source: http://dalepeck.com/about.html


Dale Peck, 1993, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1124013)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)


Further Readings:

Sprout by Dale Peck
Reading level: Ages 14 and up
Hardcover: 288 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Childrens (May 26, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1599901609
ISBN-13: 978-1599901602
Amazon: Sprout

How many secrets can you hide in plain sight?

Sprout Bradford has a secret. It’s not what you think—he’ll tell you he’s gay. He’ll tell you about his dad’s drinking and his mother’s death. The green fingerprints everywhere tell you when he last dyed his hair. But neither the reader nor Sprout are prepared for what happens when Sprout suddenly finds he’s had a more profound effect on the lives around him than he ever thought possible. Sprout is both hilarious and gripping; a story of one boy at odds with the expected.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Lists/Gay Novels


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Tags: author: dale peck, particular voices
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