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Anna Rochester & Grace Hutchins

Grace Hutchins (August 19, 1885 - July 1969) and Anna Rochester (Mar. 30, 1880 - May 11, 1966) spent more than 45 years together.

Grace Hutchins was a member of the Hutchins family. Grace was born on August 19, 1885. Grace died on July 1969 at 83 years old. Grace Hutchins's last known residence is at New York, New York County, NY 10014.

Labor reformer and communist intellectual Anna Rochester was born in New York City in 1880, to Roswell Hart Rochester (1839 - 1897) and Louisa Agatha Bamman Rochester (1845 - 1919). She was the great granddaughter of the founder of Rochester, New York. Journals kept by her mother reveal that from a very early age, Anna was intuitive and intelligent, taking an interest in things that were ‘inappropriate’ for her age and gender. While attending both Bryn Mawr College and Columbia University, she became a Marxist scholar, proclaiming herself a socialist in 1910. From 1912 until 1915, she wrote and edited for the National Labor Child Committee and from 1922-1926, she was the editor of a pacifist magazine, The World Tomorrow.

From 1920-1922, Anna and five other women formed a community house. One of these women was Grace Hutchins with whom Rochester would spend the rest of her life. According to Janet Lee (Hutchins’ and Rochester’s biographer), Hutchins and Rochester “were a part of [a] cohort of women whose commitment to social activism was integrated with their lesbian orientation.”

Rochester and Hutchins set out on a worldwide quest to examine the status of women and socialism in other countries. Returning to the United States in 1927, the two founded the Labor Research Association in New York City.

Rochester spent much of her life striving for the rights of children, women and the working class. She was most revered for her literature, which brought ideas to the surface that were new and unusual even among well-read people. The most well known of her books are Labor and Coal, Lenin and the Agrarian Question, The Populist Movement in the United States, Why Farmers are Poor, Capitalism and Progress and the one having the largest impact, Rulers of America. Besides monographs, Anna wrote many articles and pamphlets concerning the labor movement and the impact of capitalism.


Grace Hutchins (August 19, 1885 - July 1969) and Anna Rochester (Mar. 30, 1880 - May 11, 1966) spent more than 45 years together. From 1920-1922, Anna and five other women formed a community house. One of these women was Grace Hutchins with whom Rochester would spend the rest of her life. According to Janet Lee (Hutchins’ and Rochester’s biographer), Hutchins and Rochester “were a part of [a] cohort of women whose commitment to social activism was integrated with their lesbian orientation.”




International Fellowship of Reconciliation conference, Nyborg, Denmark, 1923 (attendees pictured include: Oliver Dryer, Halvad Laange, Matilda Wrede, Helena Dudley, Grace Hutchins, Kirsten Svelmoe-Thomsen, Lilian Stevenson, Pierre Ceresole, Beatrice Haystead [Hoystead?], Friedrich Siegmund-Schultze, George Davies, Max Metzger, Leyton Richards, Alfred Peter, Anna Rochester, Ethel Stevenson)

In 1966, Anna Rochester died in the home that she shared with Grace Hutchins. Grace was by her side at the time of her death and preserved her correspondence, literary manuscripts, family memorabilia and other materials that document her life. Together with the Grace Hutchins papers, this collection provides a view of the life and times of Anna Rochester.

Burial: Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, Bergen County, New Jersey, USA (Anna Rochester)

Source: Lee, Janet. Comrades and Partners: The Shared Lives of Grace Hutchins and Anna Rochester. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2000 (http://nwda.orbiscascade.org/ark:/80444/xv75247)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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Tags: activist: anna rochester, activist: grace hutchins, days of love
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