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Alfred Kinsey, Clara Bracken McMillen & Clyde Martin

Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956) was an American biologist, professor of entomology and zoology, and sexologist who in 1947 founded the Institute for Sex Research at Indiana University, now known as the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. He is best known for writing "Sexual Behavior in the Human Male" (1948) and "Sexual Behavior in the Human Female" (1953), also known as the Kinsey Reports, as well as the Kinsey scale. Kinsey's research on human sexuality, foundational to the field of sexology, provoked controversy in the 1940s and 1950s. His work has influenced social and cultural values in the United States, as well as internationally.

Kinsey married Clara Bracken McMillen in 1921, whose ceremony, like his college graduation, was also avoided by Alfred Sr. They had four children. Their first-born, Donald, died from the acute complications of juvenile diabetes in 1927, just before his fifth birthday. His daughter, Anne, was born in 1924, followed by Joan in 1925, and Bruce in 1928.

Kinsey was bisexual and polyamorous. He and his wife agreed that both could sleep with other people as well as with each other. He himself slept with other men, including his student Clyde Martin.

Kinsey designed his own house, which was built in the Vinegar Hill neighborhood of Bloomington, Indiana at 1320 First Street. There he practiced his deep interest in gardening.


Alfred Kinsey married Clara Bracken McMillen in 1921, whose ceremony, like his college graduation, was also avoided by Alfred Sr. They had four children. Their first-born, Donald, died from the acute complications of juvenile diabetes in 1927, just before his fifth birthday. His daughter, Anne, was born in 1924, followed by Joan in 1925, and Bruce in 1928. Kinsey was bisexual and polyamorous. He and his wife agreed that both could sleep with other people as well as with each other. He himself slept with other men, including his student Clyde Martin.
Shortly after he started collecting sex histories, Dr. Kinsey sought out funding for his research expenses. With a grant he received from the National Research Council, he was able to hire other researchers to assist him. The first one hired was Clyde Martin, in 1941. In 1943, he hired Wardell Pomeroy. These two researchers shared the credit with Dr. Kinsey for writing the landmark volume Sexual Behavior in the Human Male. Martin had a degree in economics; he handled the early statistical analysis for the team. Pomeroy was a psychologist by training, with a graduate degree from Indiana University. The team's diverse background contributed to the success of the project. Photo credits: All pictures were taken by the Institute's staff photographer, William Dellenback, except the photos here entitled "Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey" (unknown photographer); "Authors of the Male Volume" (Indiana University's Audio-Visual Center) and "Dr. Kinsey Lecturing (unknown photographer). (http://www.kinseyinstitute.org/about/photo-tour.html)


The research team was completed with the arrival of Harvard-trained anthropologist Paul Gebhard, in 1947. Shortly after Gebhard's arrival, Dr. Kinsey founded the Institute for Sex Research as a non-profit corporation with the assistance of Herman B Wells, president of Indiana University. Until this time, the team worked out of Dr. Kinsey's office in the Biology Building (now Swain Hall West). The purpose of the Institute was to complete the long-term research project that Dr. Kinsey planned. The four men pictured here interviewed more than 17,000 people between the years 1938-1956. Dr. Kinsey accounted for one-third of that total. After Dr. Kinsey's death in 1956, the other three continued to take histories, eventually bringing the total to more than 18,000 before the project was closed in 1963. Photo credits: All pictures were taken by the Institute's staff photographer, William Dellenback, except the photos here entitled "Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey" (unknown photographer); "Authors of the Male Volume" (Indiana University's Audio-Visual Center) and "Dr. Kinsey Lecturing (unknown photographer). (http://www.kinseyinstitute.org/about/photo-tour.html)



In 1951, Dr. Kinsey presented his research methods and findings to a three-person committee from the American Statistical Association, who visited the Institute to review the sampling procedures of the project. The ASA committee subsequently published a report on its findings. George Corner was there to represent the National Research Council, the Institute's funding agency. Photo credits: All pictures were taken by the Institute's staff photographer, William Dellenback, except the photos here entitled "Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey" (unknown photographer); "Authors of the Male Volume" (Indiana University's Audio-Visual Center) and "Dr. Kinsey Lecturing (unknown photographer). (http://www.kinseyinstitute.org/about/photo-tour.html)


The staff grew to twice the original size after the publication of Sexual Behavior in the Human Male. Cornelia Christenson was the author of the first biography of Dr. Kinsey. Also on staff were a librarian and translator. The Institute's library and special collections grew along with the staff, and are now used extensively by researchers from around the world. Photo credits: All pictures were taken by the Institute's staff photographer, William Dellenback, except the photos here entitled "Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey" (unknown photographer); "Authors of the Male Volume" (Indiana University's Audio-Visual Center) and "Dr. Kinsey Lecturing (unknown photographer). (http://www.kinseyinstitute.org/about/photo-tour.html)

Kinsey died on August 25, 1956, at the age of 62. The cause of death was reported to be a heart ailment and pneumonia. The New York Times ran the following editorial on August 27, 1956:
The untimely death of Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey takes from the American scene an important and valuable, as well as controversial, figure. Whatever may have been the reaction to his findings—and to the unscrupulous use of some of them—the fact remains that he was first, last, and always a scientist. In the long run it is probable that the values of his contribution to contemporary thought will lie much less in what he found out than in the method he used and his way of applying it. Any sort of scientific approach to the problems of sex is difficult because the field is so deeply overlaid with such things as moral precept, taboo, individual and group training, and long established behavior patterns. Some of these may be good in themselves, but they are no help to the scientific and empirical method of getting at the truth. Dr. Kinsey cut through this overlay with detachment and precision. His work was conscientious and comprehensive. Naturally, it will receive a serious setback with his death. Let us earnestly hope that the scientific spirit that inspired it will not be similarly impaired.
After the publication of Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, a character called "Dr. Kinsey" appeared on the September 15, 1953 television episode of The Jack Benny Program as a bow-tied man interviewing a young woman on board a cruise ship that has left Hawaii. When "Dr. Kinsey" identifies himself to Jack Benny, Benny steps away in embarrassment.

The early 2000s saw a renewed interest in Kinsey. In 2003 Theatre of NOTE produced the Steve Morgan Haskell play titled Fucking Wasps which followed Kinsey's life from childhood until death. Matt Sesow's paintings adorned the theatre along with David Bickford playing piano live. Written and directed by Steve Morgan Haskell, Fucking Wasps received many accolades, including a Playwriting of the Year nomination from Backstage West. Premiering in 2003, the musical Dr. Sex focuses on the relationship between Kinsey, his wife, and their shared lover Wally Matthews (based on Clyde Martin). The play had a score by Larry Bortniker, a book by Bortniker and Sally Deering, and won seven Jeff Awards. It was produced off-Broadway in 2005. The 2004 biographical film Kinsey, written and directed by Bill Condon, stars Liam Neeson as the scientist and Laura Linney as his wife. In 2004 T. Coraghessan Boyle's novel about Kinsey, The Inner Circle, was published. The following year, PBS produced the documentary Kinsey in cooperation with the Kinsey Institute, which allowed access to many of its files. Mr. Sex, a BBC radio play by Steve Coombes concerning Kinsey and his work, won the 2005 Imison Award.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Kinsey

Clara Bracken McMillen (2 October 1898 – April 1982) was an American researcher. The wife of Alfred Kinsey, she contributed to the Kinsey Reports on human sexuality.

Born in Bloomington, Indiana, McMillen majored in chemistry at Indiana University, graduating with Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and other honors. She also attended graduate school which she eventually left after marrying Alfred Kinsey. She first met him briefly the May he visited Indiana University before joining the faculty and they met again at a zoology department picnic in 1920. The couple were married from 3 June 1921 until Alfred's death in 1956. Alfred was bisexual and polyamorous. Clara and Kinsey had an open relationship. Clara slept with other men (as well as with him) and Kinsey slept with other men, including his student Clyde Martin.

Alfred and Clara had four children: Donald (1922–1927), Anne (1924), Joan (1925), and Bruce (1928). Donald died of diabetes just before his fifth birthday.

Laura Linney earned an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of McMillen in the film Kinsey.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clara_McMillen

Clyde Martin (born January 2, 1918) was an assistant to Dr. Alfred Kinsey and a co-author of Sexual Behavior in the Human Male.

Martin commenced study in economics at Indiana University in 1937. Soon after in December 1938 Martin actively sought out Kinsey and gave Kinsey his sexual history. The pair formed a bond, and Kinsey offered the cash-strapped Martin work in Kinsey’s own garden. From spring 1939, he was assisting Kinsey with tabulation of his sexual history surveys. In 1941 when funding for the project was received from the National Research Council, Martin became the first researcher hired by the project. In 1960 he resigned from the Institute for Sex Research to pursue his doctoral degree, receiving his Ph.D. (in social relations) from Johns Hopkins University in 1966. From 1966 until 1989, he conducted research, specializing in gerontology and sociology at the Francis Scott Key Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. He retired in 1989.

In May 1942, Martin married his girlfriend, Alice, in the garden of Kinsey’s house.

The 2003 musical Dr. Sex focuses on the relationship between Martin, Kinsey and his wife, with the character of Wally Matthews being based on Martin, Martin and Kinsey sharing Kinsey's wife as sex partner.

The 2004 biographical film Kinsey, written and directed by Bill Condon, stars Peter Sarsgaard as Martin.


The next step in the process after the interview was to get the information from the written answer sheet onto data punch cards. This picture shows Clyde Martin with the Institute's card sorter, the only data-processing option available to researchers at that time. Photo credits: All pictures were taken by the Institute's staff photographer, William Dellenback, except the photos here entitled "Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey" (unknown photographer); "Authors of the Male Volume" (Indiana University's Audio-Visual Center) and "Dr. Kinsey Lecturing (unknown photographer). (http://www.kinseyinstitute.org/about/photo-tour.html)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clyde_Martin

Further Readings:

Alfred C. Kinsey: A Life by James H. Jones
Paperback: 938 pages
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (November 17, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0393327248
ISBN-13: 978-0393327243
Amazon: Alfred C. Kinsey: A Life

The hidden life of Alfred C. Kinsey, the principal architect of the sexual revolution.
In this brilliant, groundbreaking biography, twenty years in the making, James H. Jones presents a moving and even shocking portrait of the man who pierced the veil of reticence surrounding human sexuality. Jones shows that the public image Alfred Kinsey cultivated of disinterested biologist was in fact a carefully crafted public persona. By any measure he was an extraordinary man—and a man with secrets.

Drawing upon never before disclosed facts about Kinsey's childhood, Jones traces the roots of Kinsey's scholarly interest in human sexuality to his tortured upbringing. Between the sexual tensions of the culture and Kinsey's devoutly religious family, Jones depicts Kinsey emerging from childhood with psychological trauma but determined to rescue humanity from the emotional and sexual repression he had suffered. New facts about his marriage, family life, and relationships with students and colleagues enrich this portrait of the complicated, troubled man who transformed the state of public discourse on human sexuality. 30 black-and-white photographs.

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