elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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Anthony Perkins, Grover Dale, Stephen Sondheim & Tab Hunter

Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932 – September 12, 1992) was an American actor. Perkins was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his second film, Friendly Persuasion. He is best known for playing Norman Bates in Psycho. His other films include The Trial, Fear Strikes Out, Tall Story, The Matchmaker, Pretty Poison, and The Black Hole.

Perkins was born in New York City, son of stage and film actor Osgood Perkins and his wife Janet Rane. He was five when his father died. Perkins was a descendant of a Mayflower passenger, John Howland. He attended The Brooks School, The Browne & Nichols School, Columbia University and Rollins College, having moved to Boston in 1942.

Perkins made his film debut in The Actress (1953). He received the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actor and an Academy Award nomination for his second film, Friendly Persuasion (1956). The tall (6'2") Perkins also portrayed the troubled former Boston Red Sox baseball player Jimmy Piersall in the 1957 true story Fear Strikes Out.

Following this, he released three pop music albums in 1957 and 1958 on Epic and RCA as "Tony Perkins". His single "Moon-Light Swim" was a hit in the United States, peaking at #24 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1957. He starred with Shirley Booth and Shirley MacLaine in the film The Matchmaker (1958).


Grover Dale is an American actor and dancer. Dale was involved in a 6-year relationship with actor Anthony Perkins that ended in 1973 when he married Anita Morris and Perkins married Berry Berenson; Dale and Morris remained married until Morris's death in 1994 and they have a son, actor James Badge Dale. In 1999 Dale founded the website, Answers4Dancers.com, whose stated goal is "to empower dancers and choreographers to think, to grow, and to create satisfying careers for themselves..."


According to an unauthorized biography by Charles Winecoff, Anthony Perkins had affairs with Christopher Makos, actor Tab Hunter, dancer Rudolf Nureyev, composer/lyricist Stephen Sondheim and dancer-choreographer Grover Dale prior to marrying Berenson. Perkins co-wrote, with composer/lyricist Stephen Sondheim, the screenplay for the 1973 film The Last of Sheila, for which they received a 1974 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Motion Picture Screenplay.


Tab Hunter (born Arthur Andrew Kelm; July 11, 1931) is an American actor, singer, former teen idol and author who has starred in over forty major films. Hunter had long-term relationships with actor Anthony Perkins and champion figure skater Ronnie Robertson, before settling down with his partner of more than 30 years, Allan Glaser. Hunter's 2006 autobiography, Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star became a New York Times best-seller as did the paperback edition in 2007.


AIDS Quilt





Perkins also acted in theater. In 1958, he was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for his performance in Look Homeward, Angel on Broadway. During this time he also co-starred in Desire Under the Elms (1958) with Sophia Loren, and played a basketball star in the romantic comedy Tall Story (1960) opposite Jane Fonda.

Perkins was cast as Norman Bates in the Alfred Hitchcock-directed film Psycho (1960). The film was a critical and commercial success, and gained Perkins international fame for his performance as the homicidal owner of the Bates Motel. Perkins' performance gained him the Best Actor Award from the International Board of Motion Picture Reviewers. In 1961, Perkins received considerable critical acclaim for his performance in the film Goodbye Again, opposite Ingrid Bergman, a performance which won him the Best Actor Award at the 1961 Cannes Film Festival.

After that came a successful career in Europe, including the role of Joseph K. in Orson Welles' 1962 adaptation of Kafka's The Trial (both 1962). Upon returning to America, he took the role of a disturbed young murderer in Pretty Poison (1968) opposite Tuesday Weld. He also played Chaplain Tappman in Catch-22 (1970).

Perkins co-wrote, with composer/lyricist Stephen Sondheim, the screenplay for the 1973 film The Last of Sheila, for which they received a 1974 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Motion Picture Screenplay.

In 1972, he appeared in The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, and was one of the many stars featured in the 1974 hit Murder on the Orient Express. In 1974, Perkins played the lead role in the romantic drama Lovin' Molly with Blythe Danner and Susan Sarandon. Perkins also hosted television's Saturday Night Live in 1976 and was featured in his only science fiction film, the box office-smash and space opus, Walt Disney's The Black Hole, in 1979.

His Broadway credits also included the 1967 Neil Simon comedy The Star-Spangled Girl, the Frank Loesser musical Greenwillow (1960), for which he was nominated for another Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical and Bernard Slade's 1979 play Romantic Comedy opposite Mia Farrow.

Perkins reprised the role of Norman Bates in three sequels to Psycho. The first, Psycho II (1983), was a box office success more than 20 years after the original film. He then starred in and directed Psycho III (for which he was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Actor) in 1986, but refused to reprise his role as Bates in the failed television pilot Bates Motel, famously boycotting the project in a very ardent, and well-received, oppositional public campaign. He did play Bates in the following made-for-cable Psycho IV: The Beginning in 1990, over which he had much creative control although he was turned down for director. Anthony directed a film in 1988 called Lucky Stiff.

Perkins starred in the sitcom pilot, The Ghost Writer, which blended horror and fantasy elements Perkins is known for. The show was created by Alan Spencer and was unaired but praised for its dark humor and Perkins' rare foray into comedy.

Films in which Perkins appeared in which his character had much resonance with Norman Bates include Ken Russell's Crimes of Passion (1984) with Kathleen Turner, and the Hungarian-produced Jekyll-Hyde remake Edge of Sanity and Daughter of Darkness.

Perkins has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, an honor he received for his influential and exceptional contributions to the motion picture industry. It is located at 6801 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

In 1991, Perkins was honored with the Donostia Lifetime Achievement Award at the San Sebastián International Film Festival.

Although he was fighting AIDS, the actor appeared in eight television productions between 1990 and 1992, including Daughter of Darkness (1990) with Mia Sara and The Naked Target (1992) with Roddy McDowall. He made his final appearance in In Deep Woods (1992) with Rosanna Arquette.

Perkins had agreed to provide the voice for the role of the dentist, Dr. Wolfe, in The Simpsons episode "Last Exit to Springfield" after Anthony Hopkins and Clint Eastwood both turned the role down, but he died before the part could be recorded. In the end, the character was voiced by Simpsons regular Hank Azaria.

On August 9, 1973, Perkins married photographer Berinthia "Berry" Berenson. They had two sons: actor Oz Perkins (b. February 2, 1974), and musician Elvis Perkins (b. February 9, 1976).

He once said he felt too nervous around women, and resisted actresses Jane Fonda and Brigitte Bardot, who had tried to seduce him during his youth. He was a very shy actor, especially in women's company. According to an unauthorized biography by Charles Winecoff, he had affairs with Christopher Makos, actor Tab Hunter, dancer Rudolf Nureyev, composer/lyricist Stephen Sondheim and dancer-choreographer Grover Dale (for about 6 years, around '72-'73) prior to marrying Berenson. He had his first intimate heterosexual experience at the age of 39 while working on the 1972 film The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean with an actress who also appeared in the film. Perkins declined to identify the actress, but "other sources" have identified her as Victoria Principal; Principal confirmed this in a People magazine article about Perkins.

Perkins died on September 12, 1992, from complications of AIDS. He was cremated, and his ashes were given to his family. His widow, Berry Berenson, was killed on American Airlines Flight 11 during the September 11 terrorist attacks in 2001.

Burial: Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend. Specifically: at his former residence in Hollywood Hills, in the terrace. A little altar has been installed in the open air, flanked by an old wooden bench. On the altar is a bronze urn which houses the cremated remains stating "Don't Fence Me In".

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Perkins

Grover Dale (born July 22, 1935) is an American actor, dancer, choreographer and theatre director. Dale was involved in a six-year relationship with actor Anthony Perkins that ended in 1973 when he married actress/singer Anita Morris; they remained married until Morris's death in 1994. Their son, actor James Badge Dale (born 1978), played the role of Simon in the 1990 film Lord of the Flies, Chase Edmunds in the TV series 24, and is the lead actor in Rubicon.

Dale was born Grover Robert Aitken in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to Ronal Rittenhouse Aitken, a restaurateur, and Emma Bertha Ammon. He studied dance with teacher Lillian Jasper in McKeesport, Pennsylvania from 1945 to 1952 before he appeared in his first professional job in with the Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera in 1953.

Dale's Broadway stage debut was in the 1956 musical, Li'l Abner as a dancer. He appeared in the original cast of West Side Story as Snowboy, a member of the Jets gang. Other stage credits include the role of Andrew in Greenwillow, in which he also understudied Anthony Perkins as Gideon Briggs; in Noël Coward's Sail Away, where he had the juvenile lead role of architect Barnaby Slade; and in Half a Sixpence, where he played Pearce, one of a quartet of 19th century London shop apprentices around whom the show is structured. He made his film debut in The Unsinkable Molly Brown. He also appeared in Half a Sixpence, The Young Girls of Rochefort, and The Landlord.

Dale has been nominated for the Tony Award twice, for his choreography of Billy, a musical version of Billy Budd and his direction of The Magic Show. He also received an Emmy Award nomination for his choreography of Barry Manilow's 1985 television musical Copacabana. As co-director of Jerome Robbins' Broadway, he shared Best Director Tony Award with the famed director-choreographer Jerome Robbins. In 1992 he became publisher/editor of Dance & Fitness magazine.

In 1999 Dale founded the website, Answers4Dancers.com, whose stated goal is "to empower dancers and choreographers to think, to grow, and to create satisfying careers for themselves..." 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grover_Dale

Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American composer and lyricist known for his contributions to musical theatre. He is the winner of an Academy Award, eight Tony Awards including the Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre, eight Grammy Awards, a Pulitzer Prize and the Laurence Olivier Award. Described by Frank Rich of the New York Times as "now the greatest and perhaps best-known artist in the American musical theater", his most famous works include (as composer and lyricist) A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Sunday in the Park with George and Into the Woods. He also wrote the lyrics for West Side Story and Gypsy. (
P: Autographed publicity photo of Stephen Sondheim, ca 1970)

Sondheim has been described as being extremely introverted, a largely solitary figure. He has stated that he doesn't believe in marriage. He came out as homosexual in the 1980s and did not live with a partner until he was 61. This was Peter Jones, a dramatist; they lived together for several years, until 1999. In an interview with Frank Rich, Sondheim said that "the outsider feeling – somebody who people want to both kiss and kill – occurred quite early in my life."

Since 2004 he has been in a relationship with Jeff Romley (born 1978). Romley, Sondheim says, works 'in cyberspace. He is a great joy in my life.’


Stephen Sondheim  with Jeff Romley.
Stephen Sondheim is an American composer and lyricist. Sondheim has been described as being introverted, a solitary figure. He has stated that he doesn't believe in marriage. He came out in the 1980s and did not live with a partner until he was 61, in 1991, with Peter Jones, a dramatist; they lived together for several years, until 1999. In an interview with Frank Rich, Sondheim said that "the outsider feeling – somebody who people want to both kiss and kill – occurred quite early in my life." Sondheim's current partner is Jeff Romley.


British stage and film actor, director, dramatist and racconteur Peter Ustinov with Peter Jones as they record Ustinov's impression of a German professor giving a lecture on Mozart, 1953.


Robert E. Griffith was associate producer and stage producer of the Broadway version of The Pajama Game, Damn Yankees! and West Side Story. He was partner of Harold Prince. Griffith died in 1961, and Prince continued on his own, supported by loyal investors. (P: The West Side Story Broadway production team in 1957: (l. to r.) lyricist Stephen Sondheim, scriptwriter Arthur Laurents, producers Hal Prince and Robert Griffith (seated), composer Leonard Bernstein and choreographer Jerome Robbins.)

Sondheim has written material for movies, including the 1981 Warren Beatty film Reds, for which he contributed the song "Goodbye For Now". He also wrote five songs for the 1990 movie Dick Tracy, including "Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man)" which won the Academy Award for Best Song.

He was president of the Dramatists Guild from 1973 to 1981. In celebration of his 80th birthday, the Henry Miller's Theatre was renamed the Stephen Sondheim Theatre on September 15, 2010, and the BBC Proms staged a concert in his honor. Cameron Mackintosh has described Sondheim as "possibly the greatest lyricist ever."



Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Sondheim

Further Readings:

Anthony Perkins: Split Image (Advocate Life Stories) by Charles Winecoff
Paperback: 480 pages
Publisher: Advocate Books (May 1, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1555839509
ISBN-13: 978-1555839505
Amazon: Anthony Perkins: Split Image

Paramount groomed him to replace the late James Dean and become Hollywood’s hottest heartthrob. But his landmark performance as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho killed that—and spawned an image of Anthony Perkins that eerily paralleled his conflicted, fractured off-screen life.

Anthony Perkins: Split Image insightfully and comprehensively documents the life of this great actor, who was forced to act the part of ladies’ man while privately struggling with his own homosexuality, and chronicles his complicated search for acceptance.

Newly revised and updated for this tenth anniversary edition, Anthony Perkins: Split Image is both a harrowing look at life in the Hollywood closet and a poignant human drama that will change your vision of Anthony Perkins forever.

Anthony Perkins: A Haunted Life by Ronald Bergan
Hardcover: 240 pages
Publisher: Little Brown & Co; 1st edition (May 1995)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0316906972
ISBN-13: 978-0316906975
Amazon: Anthony Perkins: A Haunted Life

Like the infamous character, Norman Bates, whom he portrayed in the Hitchcock film "Psycho", Anthony Hopkins was a loner with a fear of women, due in part to his domineering mother. This biography describes how, to a great extent, his life was an attempt to bury both his mother and Norman Bates. His struggle, which took him through homosexuality, psychoanalysis and drugs, culminated in a happy marriage in his forties, but was then blighted by AIDS. The book, for which the author interviewed a wide variety of people who knew and worked with Perkins, also depicts a attractive man of charm, humour, courage and talent.

 
Stephen Sondheim: A Life by Meryle Secrest
Paperback: 480 pages
Publisher: Delta; 1st edition (June 8, 1999)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0385334125
ISBN-13: 978-0385334129
Amazon: Stephen Sondheim: A Life

In the first full-scale life of the most important composer-lyricist at work in musical theatre today, Meryle Secrest, the biographer of Frank Lloyd Wright and Leonard Bernstein, draws on her extended conversations with Stephen Sondheim as well as on her interviews with his friends, family, collaborators, and lovers to bring us not only the artist--as a master of modernist compositional style--but also the private man.

Beginning with his early childhood on New York's prosperous Upper West Side, Secrest describes how Sondheim was taught to play the piano by his father, a successful dress manufacturer and amateur musician. She writes about Sondheim's early ambition to become a concert pianist, about the effect on him of his parents' divorce when he was ten, about his years in military and private schools. She writes about his feelings of loneliness and abandonment, about the refuge he found in the home of Oscar and Dorothy Hammerstein, and his determination to become just like Oscar.

Secrest describes the years when Sondheim was struggling to gain a foothold in the theatre, his attempts at scriptwriting (in his early twenties in Rome on the set of Beat the Devil with Bogart and Huston, and later in Hollywood as a co-writer with George Oppenheimer for the TV series Topper), living the Hollywood life.

Here is Sondheim's ascent to the peaks of the Broadway musical, from his chance meeting with play-wright Arthur Laurents, which led to his first success--as co-lyricist with Leonard Bernstein on West Side Story--to his collaboration with Laurents on Gypsy, to his first full Broadway score, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. And Secrest writes about his first big success as composer, lyricist, writer in the 1960s with Company, an innovative and sophisticated musical that examined marriage à la mode. It was the start of an almost-twenty-year collaboration with producer and director Hal Prince that resulted in such shows as Follies, Pacific Overtures, Sweeney Todd, and A Little Night Music.

We see Sondheim at work with composers, producers, directors, co-writers, actors, the greats of his time and ours, among them Leonard Bernstein, Ethel Merman, Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Jerome Robbins, Zero Mostel, Bernadette Peters, and Lee Remick (with whom it was said he was in love, and she with him), as Secrest vividly re-creates the energy, the passion, the despair, the excitement, the genius, that went into the making of show after Sondheim show.

A biography that is sure to become the standard work on Sondheim's life and art

Hollywood Gays: Conversations With: Cary Grant, Liberace, Tony Perkins, Paul Lynde, Cesar Romero, Randolph Scott... by Boze Hadleigh
Hardcover: 384 pages
Publisher: Barricade Books; First Edition edition (August 1, 1996)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1569800839
ISBN-13: 978-1569800836
Amazon: Hollywood Gays: Conversations With: Cary Grant, Liberace, Tony Perkins, Paul Lynde, Cesar Romero, Randolph Scott...

Helps blow the cover off the gilded cage. It opens the closet door for a look at, and conversation with, ten gay men of the silver screen.

More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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Tags: dancer: grover dale, days of love tb, musician: stephen sondheim
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