elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Andrew Kopkind & John Scagliotti

Andrew Kopkind (August 24, 1935 – October 23, 1994) was an American journalist. He was renowned for his reporting during the tumultuous years of the late 1960s; he wrote about the anti-Vietnam War protests, American Civil Rights Movement, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Students for a Democratic Society, the Black Panther Party, the Weathermen, President Johnson's "Great Society" initiatives, and California gubernatorial campaign of Ronald Reagan.

Kopkind was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He received a B.A. from Cornell University (1957), where he was editor of the Cornell Daily Sun.

From 1958 to 1959, Kopkind worked as a reporter for the Washington Post. He then studied at the London School of Economics, receiving an M.S. in 1961.

In 1961, Kopkind joined staff of Time Magazine, reporting mainly from California. From 1965 to 1967, he was associate editor of The New Republic; from 1965 to 1969 he was a correspondent for New Statesman. In 1968, he founded Hard Times and worked briefly for Ramparts (1970).

In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.

From the 1970s onwards, he contributed regularly to The Village Voice, New York Review of Books, The Nation, and Grand Street.


Andrew Kopkind, far left, and John Scagliotti, far right, sit with journalist Alexander Cockburn, seated on hood of car, and his daughter, Daisy Cockburn, in Guilford in 1985.
Andrew Kopkind was an American journalist. He was renowned for his reporting during '60s; he wrote about the anti-Vietnam War protests, American Civil Rights Movement, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Students for a Democratic Society, the Black Panther Party, the Weathermen, President Johnson and Reagan. In the early 1970s he and his long-time companion, John Scagliotti (they would remain together for 24 years), hosted the "Lavender Hour," the first commercial gay/lesbian radio show.


The birthday convention ticket for President and VP, August 1984. l to r: Andy Kopkind, Katerine Kilgore, Alexander Cockburn, John Scagliotti

In the early 1970s he and his long-time companion, John Scagliotti (they would remain together for 24 years), hosted the "Lavender Hour," the first commercial gay/lesbian radio show.

Kopkind died of cancer in 1994, at age 59.

Kopkind authored two books: America: The Mixed Curse (1969) and The Thirty Years' Wars: Dispatches and Diversions of a Radical Journalist, 1965-1994, an anthology of his writing which was published posthumously in 1995, with an introduction by Alexander Cockburn.

"When searching for words to describe Kopkind Colony, JoAnn Wypijewski discards several descriptions: It's not a writer's retreat, she says, and it's not a workshop in the traditional sense.

She settles on this: "It's a place to exhale."

"As life gets increasingly more stressful and increasingly more crowded, we're not thinking. We're not pausing. We're not exhaling. We're not reveling in life," Wypijewski said. "I think Kopkind will always have that role."

What began as a memorial to journalist Andrew Kopkind has become a vibrant, annual, week-long convergence of ideas and activism that has touched an "ever-widening circle of people" at Tree Frog Farm.

Andrew Kopkind was seen as an inspiration during his life as a political journalist, which included work for The New Republic, Time magazine and The Nation.

Having already found part-time residence in Guilford, Kopkind in 1974 bought Tree Frog Farm. While having some roots in the communes that sprung up here in the late 1960s, the farm became a sort of hangout for journalists, filmmakers and others -- "a place where a number of people would come all summer long," recalled Kopkind's longtime companion, John Scagliotti.

"This mixture became a very fascinating thing," said Scagliotti, who serves as Kopkind Colony administrator. "Andy, in many ways, was the leader of this -- he loved smart, young people."

The nonprofit Kopkind Colony -- which also publishes its lectures and hosts forums outside the summer "camp" setting -- has changed and expanded since 1999.

For instance, annual filmmakers' workshops -- dubbed "flim camp" in conjunction with the Center for Independent Documentary -- are in their ninth year.

"Andy was very much involved in film. He was a film critic, and he worked with me on my films," Scagliotti said. "We've had people who are just beginning in film and people who are major filmmakers. So there's a mixture of that."

As the number of Kopkind alumni grows, Scagliotti said he's not surprised to see "little Kopkind reunion" gatherings in cities when he travels. He says there is a kinship among those who have visited over the years.

"Even though they might have come for different themes, there's still a universality," Scagliotti said." (extract from: http://www.reformer.com/ci_23652383/rsquo-it-has-changed-my-life-rsquo-kopkind)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Kopkind


Andrew Kopkind, 1993, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1121512)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)


Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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Tags: author: andrew kopkind, days of love, particular voices
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