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Jack Plotnick (born October 30, 1968)

Jack Stuart Plotnick (born October 30, 1968) is an American film and television actor.

Born in Worthington, Ohio, Plotnick has appeared on Ellen, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Drawn Together, Wrong and his drag persona, "Evie Harris" in Girls Will Be Girls. He had a recurring role on The Mentalist as Red John suspect Brett Partridge.

Along with co-stars Miss Coco Peru and Varla Jean Merman, Plotnick shared the Best Actor Grand Jury Award at Outfest 2003 and "Best Actress" honors at the 2003 U.S. Comedy Arts Festival for his role in Girls Will Be Girls.

Plotnick performed in the July 2012 edition of Don't Tell My Mother! (Live Storytelling), a monthly showcase in which actors, authors, screenwriters and comedians share true stories they would never want their mothers to know.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Plotnick

Further Readings:

Ladies or Gentlemen: A Pictorial History of Male Cross-Dressing in the Movies by Jean-Louis Ginibre
Hardcover: 408 pages
Publisher: Filipacchi Publishing; 1St Edition edition (November 1, 2005)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1933231041
ISBN-13: 978-1933231044
Amazon: Ladies or Gentlemen: A Pictorial History of Male Cross-Dressing in the Movies

From Greek drama through vaudeville and modern cinema, nothing in the theatrical experience has ever guaranteed a laugh like a man in a dress. This spectacular pictorial history examines the grand tradition of male cross-dressing in the movies through more than 700 photos, more than half of which are previously unpublished. The screen's greatest stars, from comedians like Buster Keaton and Peter Sellers to "serious" actors like Marlon Brando and Max von Sydow, are pictured in everything from bustiers to ball gowns. Just as in real life, the cinematic motives for cross-dressing are complex, ranging from plot device ("I Was a Male War Bride) and social commentary ("Tootsie) to the simple sight gags of Laurel and Hardy. The book explores these and myriad other reasons actors are coaxed out of dress suits and into dresses. By turns provocative, serious, and silly, "Ladies or Gentlemen is a delightful study of a seldom-explored facet of cinema history.

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Tags: gay classics, persistent voices
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