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Steve Tracy (October 3, 1952 – November 27, 1986)

Steve Tracy (October 3, 1952 – November 27, 1986) was an American film and television actor. Tracy is best known for his role on Little House on the Prairie as Percival Dalton.

He attended Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, and the Theatre Department at Los Angeles City College in Los Angeles, California, as well as the Harvey Lembeck Comedy Workshop.

Tracy is best known for his recurring role as Percival Dalton in the television series Little House on the Prairie in the early 1980s. After the end of the series, Tracy maintained a friendship with his on-screen wife Alison Arngrim (Nellie Oleson). Alison Arngrim and Tracy were very close while filming on the set. During the series, there were rumors that he and Arngrim were having a love affair. According to Arngrim that was untrue. Arngrim has also stated that she was the only one on the set of Little House on the Prairie who knew that Tracy was gay.

He appeared in several films and other television programs from 1977 to 1986, including Quincy, M.E., Desperate Moves, The Jeffersons, National Lampoon's Class Reunion and Say Yes.

Tracy died of AIDS-related complications in 1986, after which Arngrim became involved in AIDS activism. His ashes were scattered under the Hollywood Sign in the Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, under the letter "D".


AIDS Quilt







Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Tracy

Further Readings:

Acts of Intervention: Performance, Gay Culture, and AIDS (Unnatural Acts: Theorizing the Performative) by David Roman
Series: Unnatural Acts: Theorizing the Performative
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Indiana University Press; 1St Edition edition (February 22, 1998)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0253211689
ISBN-13: 978-0253211682
Amazon: Acts of Intervention: Performance, Gay Culture, and AIDS

From cabarets and candlelight vigils to full-scale Broadway productions such as Angels in America and Rent, over the past fifteen years public performances and dramatic texts have shaped, and been shaped by, the history of AIDS. Author David Roman examines the ways that gay men have used alternative, activist, and mainstream theatre and performance to intervene in the AIDS crisis. He considers solo performance, community-based projects, mixed-media events, activist demonstrations, and AIDS education theatre initiatives.

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Tags: gay classics
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