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C. Jay Cox (born July 21, 1962)

C. Jay Cox (born 1962 in Nevada) is an American director and screenwriter.

Cox grew up in Eastern Nevada and made his first film when he was eight years old (a two-minute film noir called Vampire Cave). Growing up, he continued writing and creating short films. He graduated with a BA in Journalism from Brigham Young University. He then moved to Los Angeles (where he currently lives) and worked as an actor, performance artist, photographer and other jobs. He began making video shorts, industrial films and documentaries. After he wrote his screenplay for The Thing in Bob's Garage in 1998, he was given a number of jobs rewriting other people's screenplays.[1] His own screenplay, Sweet Home Alabama, became a box office hit when the film, starring Reese Witherspoon, was released in 2002. His next film Latter Days, which he wrote, produced and directed, won him several audience awards at film festivals. The title Latter Days refers to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. His familiarity with the subject matter came from his upbringing as a fifth-generation Mormon. When he moved to Los Angeles he came out as gay. The film is not autobiographical, but it is deeply personal.[2] He directed and produced the 2008 film Kiss the Bride, starring Tori Spelling, and is a screenwriter for the 2009 film New in Town, starring Renée Zellweger and Harry Connick, Jr. He mentioned in a 2004 interview that some of his idols are James L. Brooks, Sydney Pollack and Billy Wilder.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._Jay_Cox

Further Readings:

Latter Days by C. Jay Cox
Paperback: 224 pages
Publisher: Alyson Books; 1 edition (April 1, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1555838685
ISBN-13: 978-1555838683
Amazon: Latter Days: A Novel

Winner of the Outstanding First Narrative Feature Award at OUTFest (the Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Film Festival), and the Best Gay Male Feature Film Award at the Philadelphia International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival.

Combine a hunky, repressed Mormon missionary and an L.A. party boy, sensual sex and knowing humor, and the result is a sure-fire crowd-pleaser. Christian is a handsome, young man who flits from guy to guy without much of a thought in his pretty little head. So when his roommate Julie discovers that the gorgeous group of young men who moved in next door are Mormon missionaries, they bet on whether Christian can bed one of them. Christian quickly moves in for the kill, identifying Elder Aaron Davis as a gay in the closet—and quite a sexy one at that. Their initial encounters have a charged sexual tension, but fear of the devil keeps Aaron’s libido at bay. When the two are alone together, Aaron’s Mormon missionary roommates interrupt, spot their brother as gay and send him back in shame to his Idaho hometown and embarrassed parents. But in a heartfelt conclusion that brought festival audiences to their feet, love wins out over fear.

The feature film version of Latter Days was released in January 2004, starring Jacqueline Bisset, Mary Kay Place, Wes Ramsey, Steve Sandvoss and Amber Benson.

C. Jay Cox wrote the screenplay for the smash hit film Sweet Home Alabama, starring Reese Witherspoon, and made his directing debut with Latter Days, for which he also wrote the screenplay.

“It’s an all-stops-out heart-tugger for sure . . . its emotional wallop is earned honestly and uncompromisingly.”—Kevin Thomas, L.A. Times

"It's wonderful...it's sweet; it's sad; there's lots of nudity--you'll love it."--Frank DeCaro, The Advocate

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels

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Tags: author: c. jay cox, in the spotlight
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