elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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Josh Lanyon (born January 13)

Josh Lanyon is an American writer of LGBT mystery and adventure fiction, usually with a strong romantic subplot.

Over the past decade Lanyon has written numerous novels, novellas and short stories as well as the non-fiction writing guide Man, Oh Man! Writing Quality M/M Fiction. He is the author of the Holmes & Moriarity comic mysteries as well as the Adrien English mystery novels, including The Hell You Say, winner of the 2006 USABookNews award for GLBT fiction.

Lanyon has collaborated with several other writers including Laura Baumbach (co-writer of the Eppie Award-winning Mexican Heat), Jordan Castillo Price, and Sarah Black.

In December 2009, Lanyon's first foray into spec fiction was published through Blind Eye Books. Strange Fortune is described as an AU British Raj adventure with romantic and fantasy elements.

Lanyon's first novel, Fatal Shadows, was published in 2000 through the now defunct indie British publisher Gay Men's Press. Since then he has published with a variety of presses, both electronic and print, including Samhain Publishing, Carina Press, Loose Id, Blind Eye Books, JCP Books, Liquid Silver, MLR Press, Aspen Mountain Press, Torquere, etc. Lanyon currently lives in Los Angeles, California.

Adrien English Mysteries Fatal Shadows (2000, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-15-4 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-07-9 (ebook)
A Dangerous Thing (2002, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-16-1 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-08-6 (ebook)
The Hell You Say (2006, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-19-2 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-00-0 (ebook)
Death of a Pirate King (2008, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-26-0 (print) + ISBN 978-0-9847669-0-1 (ebook)
The Dark Tide (2009, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-51-2 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-01-7 (ebook)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josh_Lanyon
I read Snowball in Hell twice and was blown away by it. Lanyon balances a lot in this relatively short work. Great period detail—it’s 1943. Interesting mystery. But what had me riveted was the characterization of the two leads: Lt. Matthew Spain and reporter Nathan Doyle. Two men falling in love at this time wasn’t easy and, in fact, I was quite sad at times. Very moving, with a strong emotional punch. I'm still hoping for a sequel. --Joely Skye
Honestly, I’ve never read anything by Josh Lanyon that I didn’t like, but The Ghost Wore Yellow Socks and Out of the Blue are my favorites. I think they both showcase Lanyon’s knack for characterization, setting, and whatever that special something is that makes me devour his books as if they were made of chocolate. --Cassandra Gold
Aside from the Adrien English mysteries just being a really fantastic series (I bought The Dark Tide the day it came out and then let it sit for a month because I was so sad to see the series end), Fatal Shadows has the dubious distinction of being the first ebook I ever bought, and it served as my gateway drug to the greater world of e-publishers and m/m romance. Plus, I could easily populate half this list with Lanyon’s books. I think his special gift is the novella; I continue to be impressed by how he can give you everything you need to understand the characters and situations in so few words. --Kate McMurray
I’ve had a LiveJournal account since the day I read “Fatal Shadows” by Josh Lanyon. I came here as an author stalker. I simply don’t have words to describe how much I love the Adrien English series. Something about Jake and Adrien, the constant conflict and the very human and dreadfully unwise choices, really worked for me. I always say I’d read Josh if he wrote drug prescription inserts and it’s as true today as it was that day. I just finished “The Dark Farewell” last night. I still like the mysteries best because they were my first, but looking at this list, it’s possible I just like mysteries. :D --Z.A. Maxfield
Though not a huge history buff, I couldn't resist picking up Josh Lanyon's novella, Out of the Blue. And I'm extremely happy I did. I've enjoyed all the Lanyon's books I've read to date but would have to say, Out of the Blue is some of Lanyon's finest writing—Witty, charming, amazingly sensual, and funny—Well, that describes all Lanyon books, but there was something different about this one. I noticed the style is different, but if anything, his choice aids in the action, making the story concise—fast-paced. Set in France during WWI, Out of the Blue hits all the right buttons in this story of lost love, blackmail, forced seduction, and new beginnings. British ace Bat Bryant and American pilot Cowboy Cooper seem an unlikely pair, yet Lanyon fashions the perfect scenario, feeding into a confrontation that plays out well. Against the odds and despite their wills, Bat and Cowboy work—and they work each other over pretty darn well throughout this story. And Lanyon writes in these two men's emotions so perfectly, the story is utterly romantic on top of erotic. Readers of historical military and/or M/M erotic romance will want to read this one! --Bryl R. Tyne
What do you get when you take murder, an amateur mystery-writing sleuth with a heart condition who wields his sarcastic tongue to deflect suspicion and innuendo…then mix it with a dash of romance including in a hunky cop with commitment issues, a leather fetish, who suffers from a severe case of homophobia despite being one himself? A whole lotta happy readers. I have yet to read the fifth and final book in the The Adrien English Mystery Series, mainly because I know I won’t have to say goodbye as long as I don’t. But this series is brilliantly written and readers are deliciously tormented and teased by the will-they/won’t-they, on again/off again relationship between Adrien and Jake. --Ethan Day
Mexican Heat is possibly one of the best gay detective stories I’ve ever read. Baumbach and Lanyon keep you on the edge of your seat, and turning page after page as they skillfully weave the love affair of Gabriel Sandalini, a feisty undercover cop, and Antonio Lorenzo, against a backdrop of murder and mayhem involving wicked drug lords and hit men. Super! --J.P. Bowie
Okay, everyone knows The Adrien English Series, so it´s sort of like recommending "Star Wars" to sci-fi fans, but seriously, it has to be on my "top 10" list. --Astrid Amara
The Hell You Say was the first of his Adrien English books I read, which led me to all his others. --P.A. Brown
Further Readings:

Fatal Shadows (The Adrien English Mysteries) by Josh Lanyon
Paperback: 196 pages
Publisher: JustJoshin (May 14, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1937909158
ISBN-13: 978-1937909154
Amazon: Fatal Shadows (The Adrien English Mysteries)
Amazon Kindle: Fatal Shadows (The Adrien English Mysteries)

One sunny morning Los Angeles bookseller and aspiring mystery author Adrien English opens his front door to murder. His old high school buddy (and employee) has been found stabbed to death in a back alley following a loud and very public argument with Adrien the previous evening. Naturally the cops want to ask Adrien a few questions; they are none too impressed with his answers, and when a few hours later someone breaks into Adrien's shop and ransacks it, the law is inclined to think Adrien is trying to divert suspicion from himself. Adrien knows better. Adrien knows he is next on the killer's list.

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels

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Tags: author: josh lanyon, in the spotlight
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