elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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elisa_rolle

Andrea Goldsmith & Dorothy Porter

Andrea Goldsmith (born 24 March 1950) is an Australian writer and novelist.

Goldsmith was born in Melbourne, Victoria, to an Australian-Jewish family. She started learning the piano as a young child, and music remains an abiding passion. She initially trained as a speech pathologist and worked for several years with children with severe communication impairment until becoming a full-time writer in the late 1980s. During the 1990s she taught creative writing at Deakin University, and she continues to conduct workshops and mentor new novelists.

She travels widely, and London, in particular, figures prominently in her novels. At the same time, she describes herself as 'a deeply Melbourne person'.

Andrea Goldsmith has published six novels. Rich in ideas and characterisation, they tell of contemporary life in all its diversity. Narratives of ambition, love, family, art, music and relationships abound in her books.

She also writes literary essays on topics as diverse as Oliver Sacks ('Oliver Sacks: Anthropologist of Mind'), nuclear physics and life-threatening illness ('Chain Reaction') and Jewish-Australian identity ('Talmudic Excursions'). She is a lively and dramatic performer of her work and reads regularly at venues throughout Australia. She was lecturer in creative writing at Deakin University in Melbourne (1995-8) and while writer-in-residence at La Trobe University she edited an anthology written by a group of people with gambling problems, called Calling A Spade A Spade. She conducts workshops and short courses for writers of fiction, and she mentors new novelists.


@Carmel Shute. Andrea Goldsmith & Dorothy Porter at the 2008 Davitt Awards
Dorothy Featherstone Porter (26 March 1954 – 10 December 2008) was an Australian poet. In 1993 she moved to Melbourne's inner suburbs to be with her partner and fellow writer, Andrea Goldsmith. They lived together until Porter's death in 2008. The couple were coincidentally both shortlisted in the 2003 Miles Franklin Award for literature. In 2009, Porter was posthumously recognised by the website Samesame.com.au as one of the most influential gay and lesbian Australians.

She has been a guest at all the major literary festivals in Australia. Her interview at the 2009 Sydney Writers' Festival can be viewed through Slow TV at http://www.themonthly.com.au/reunion-andrea-goldsmith-conversation-drusilla-modjeska-1689.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrea_Goldsmith

Dorothy Featherstone Porter (26 March 1954 – 10 December 2008) was an Australian poet. In 1993 she moved to Melbourne's inner suburbs to be with her partner and fellow writer, Andrea Goldsmith. They lived together until Porter's death in 2008. The couple were coincidentally both shortlisted in the 2003 Miles Franklin Award for literature. In 2009, Porter was posthumously recognised by the website Samesame.com.au as one of the most influential gay and lesbian Australians.

Porter was born in Sydney. Her father was barrister Chester Porter and her mother, Jean, was a high school chemistry teacher. Porter attended the Queenwood School for Girls. She graduated from the University of Sydney in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts majoring in English and History.

Porter's awards include The Age Book of the Year for poetry, the National Book Council Award for The Monkey's Mask and the FAW Christopher Brennan Award for poetry. Two of her verse novels were shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award: What a Piece of Work in 2000 and Wild Surmise in 2003. In 2000, the film The Monkey's Mask was made of her verse novel of the same name. In 2005 her libretto, The Eternity Man, co-written with composer Jonathan Mills, was performed at the Sydney Festival.

Porter's most recent publication, her fifth verse novel, was El Dorado, about a serial child killer. The book was nominated for several awards including the inaugural Prime Minister's Literary Award in 2007 and for Best Fiction in the Ned Kelly Awards.

Since her death, The Bee Hut (2009) has been published posthumously, as has her final completed work, an essay on literary criticism and emotions and literature entitled On Passion.

Porter, who found many outlets for writing including fiction for young adults and libretti for chamber opera, was working on a rock opera called January with Tim Finn at the time of her death.

Porter was a self-described pagan, committed to pagan principles of courage, stoicism and commitment to the earth and beauty.

Porter had been suffering from breast cancer for four years before her death, but "many thought she was winning the battle," according to journalist Matt Buchanan. In the last three weeks of her life she became very sick and was admitted to hospital, where she was in intensive care for the final 10 days. She died aged 54 on 10 December 2008.

On 21 February 2010, actress Cate Blanchett read excerpts from Porter's posthumously published short work on literary criticism and emotions in literature, On Passion, at the Malthouse Theatre, Melbourne.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Porter

Further Readings:

The Monkey's Mask (A Mask Noir Title) by Dorothy Porter
Series: A Mask Noir Title
Paperback: 256 pages
Publisher: Serpent's Tail; New edition edition (November 1, 1997)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1852425490
ISBN-13: 978-1852425494
Amazon: The Monkey's Mask (A Mask Noir Title)

The Australian publishing sensation: a lesbian thriller in verse.

More LGBT Couples at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance


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