elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Guthrie McClintic & Katharine Cornell

Guthrie McClintic (August 6, 1893 - October 29, 1961) was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York.

McClintic was born in Seattle and attended Washington University and New York's American Academy of Dramatic Arts and became an actor but soon became a stage manager and casting director for major Broadway producer Winthrop Ames. His Broadway directorial debut was on A. A. Milne's The Dover Road. McClintic's first major success was on The Barretts of Wimpole Street featuring his wife in 1931. He also directed Hamlet featuring John Gielgud in New York in 1937.

Katharine served on the Board of Directors of The Rehearsal Club, a place where young actresses could stay while looking for work in the theatre. McClintic sometimes found roles for the young women in his plays.

In what may have been lavender marriages, homosexual McClintic was married to actress Estelle Winwood, and then to actress Katharine Cornell—herself a lesbian—for forty years. After they were married, they formed a production team M.C. & C Company, which produced all the plays for the rest of his life. He directed every play that Cornell starred in, including Romeo and Juliet, Candida, Antony and Cleopatra, No Time for Comedy, Antigone, St. Joan, The Doctor's Dilemma, Three Sisters, and There Shall Be No Night, and The Constant Wife. Their production company brought over many of the leading Shakespearean actors of the day, giving them their first prominent Broadway roles, including John Gielgud, Ralph Richardson, Maurice Evans, and Laurence Olivier.


Katharine Cornell was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic. Guthrie McClintic was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York. In what may have been lavender marriages, homosexual McClintic was married to actress Estelle Winwood, and then to actress Katharine Cornell—herself a lesbian—for forty years.

McClintic died of cancer on October 29, 1961, in New York City. His widow retired from acting shortly after his death, her last role being in Jerome Kilty's dramatization of Dear Liar in 1961.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guthrie_McClintic

Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974) was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She was born in Berlin to American parents and raised in Buffalo, New York.

Cornell is regarded as one of the greatest American stage actresses of the 20th century. She was nicknamed "First Lady of the Theatre," a title also bestowed upon her friend Helen Hayes, though each deferred to the other. Cornell is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic; the couple formed a production company, which gave them complete artistic freedom in choosing and producing plays. Their production company gave first or prominent Broadway roles to some of the greatest actors of the 20th century, including many of the great British Shakespearean actors. In addition, the strength of her acting and the quality of the productions brought popular success to such authors as George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare, who until then were not often performed, thereby paving the way for their eventual popularity throughout the country for the rest of the century and beyond.

She married Guthrie McClintic on September 8, 1921, in her aunt's summer home in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. Cornell's family often summered there among other wealthy Americans. Nonetheless, it is generally acknowledged that Cornell was a lesbian, and Guthrie was gay, and their union was a lavender marriage. She was a member of the "sewing circles" in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. The couple eventually bought a townhouse at 23 Beekman Place in Manhattan.


Katharine Cornell was a member of the sewing circles in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. On October 29, 1961, McClintic, Cornell's husband, passed away at his and Cornell’s Palisades home. Over the next 13 years, Cornell split her time between her Manhattan apartment and her beloved Martha’s Vineyard house, where she lived with lifelong friend and companion, Nancy Hamilton.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Cornell

Nancy Hamilton (1908–1985) was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer.

She worked in the New York theater from 1932-1954. She wrote sketches and lyrics for the revues New Faces of 1934 (1934), One for the Money (1939), Two for the Show (1940) and Three to Make Ready (1946). She is best known as the lyricist for the popular song, "How High the Moon." She was the lifelong partner of legendary actress Katharine Cornell.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Hamilton

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4406028.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Tags: days of love
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 1 comment