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Joan Snyder & Maggie Cammer

Joan Snyder (born April 16, 1940) is an American painter from New York. She is a MacArthur Fellow and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her paintings have been exhibited at several museums, including the de Saisset Museum and the Jewish Museum. In 1980, Snyder moved to Mulberry Street in Manhattan where she raised her daughter and painted in a nearby studio. She later became afflicted with Lyme Disease. In 1989, she moved to Park Slope, Brooklyn so that she could be with her new partner, Maggie Cammer, who is a New York City Civil Court judge.

Joan Snyder's "stroke paintings" from the late 1960s and early 1970s were "abstract compositions, many of them quite large, that are loosely based on a grid format and that together constitute a dissection of the language of painting." The 1980s and 1990s saw a refinement of her earlier vocabulary as "[...] brighter feminine colors and the grid returned. Written phrases, natural materials, and fabrics such as burlap and silks also appeared."

Her paintings have been described by the Boston Globe as "abstract", "intuitive and spontaneous", and "pointedly political". She also paints with a colorful style, using floral effects which are branded with paint sprinkled with a range of materials, such as jewel-like metal objects.

In 1978, Joan Snyder's paintings were exhibited in the Neuberger Museum at the State University of New York at Purchase. Snyder's work has been featured at a number of museums. From June to August 1989, Joan Snyder Collects Joan Snyder, a collection of Snyder's favorite paintings, was featured at the de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University. From September to October 1989, this collection was exhibited at Sonoma State University. In 2005, Joan Snyder: A Painting Survey, a retrospective collection of Snyder's paintings was exhibited at Danforth Art in Framingham, Massachusetts.


Joan Snyder Painter Brooklyn, NY Age: 67 http://www.macfound.org/fellows/838/ September 20, 2007. (AP Photo/Stewart Cairns)
Joan Snyder is an American painter from New York. She is a MacArthur Fellow and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her paintings have been exhibited at several museums, including the de Saisset Museum and the Jewish Museum. In 1980, Snyder moved to Mulberry Street in Manhattan where she raised her daughter and painted in a nearby studio. She later became afflicted with Lyme Disease. In 1989, she moved to Park Slope, Brooklyn so that she could be with her new partner, Maggie Cammer, who is a New York City Civil Court judge.

Also in 2005, Joan Snyder: A Painting Survey, 1969–2005, a collection of 30 paintings about the Holocaust and AIDS by Snyder, was displayed at the Jewish Museum in New York City.

Joan Snyder received a MacArthur Fellowship, which is often referred to as the "genius award", in 2007. She has received several other honors for her paintings including the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1974 and the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1983.

Joan Snyder was born in 1940 in Highland Park, New Jersey. In 1962, she received her BA from Douglass Residential College, which is part of Rutgers University. In 1966, she received her MFA from Douglass.

In 1969, she married Larry Fink. Snyder had a miscarriage, but later gave birth to a daughter named Molly in 1979. Snyder and Fink lived in a farm in Pennsylvania before getting divorced later.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Snyder

Further Readings:

Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City by Constance Rosenblum
Paperback: 256 pages
Publisher: NYU Press (March 25, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0814771548
ISBN-13: 978-0814771549
Amazon: Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City
Amazon Kindle: Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City

There may be eight million stories in the Naked City, but there are also nearly three million dwelling places, ranging from Park Avenue palaces to Dickensian garrets and encompassing much in between. The doorways to these residences are tantalizing portals opening onto largely invisible lives. Habitats offers 40 vivid and intimate stories about how New Yorkers really live in their brownstones, their apartments, their mansions, their lofts, and as a whole presents a rich, multi-textured portrait of what it means to make a home in the world’s most varied and powerful city.

These essays, expanded versions of a selection of the Habitats column published in the Real Estate section of The New York Times, take readers to both familiar and remote sections of the city—to history-rich townhouses, to low-income housing projects, to out-of-the-way places far from the beaten track, to every corner of the five boroughs—and introduce them to a wide variety of families and individuals who call New York home. These pieces reveal a great deal about the city’s past and its rich store of historic dwellings. Along with exploring the deep and even mystical connections people feel to the place where they live, these pieces, taken as a whole, offer a mosaic of domestic life in one of the world’s most fascinating cities and a vivid portrait of the true meaning of home in the 21st-century metropolis.

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