elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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elisa_rolle

Owen Hawley & Ralph Schroeder

Owen Hawley (August 29, 1930 - July 31, 2006) and Ralph Schroeder (1920 - 1976) are buried together at Mound Cemetery, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, USA

Owen Hawley was a professor at Marietta College. He lived with another man, the same way someone else would live with a wife or a husband. His partner, Ralph Schroeder, died in 1976, and Owen Hawley died in 2006. They are buried in Mound Cemetery, along with many Revolutionary War soldiers and the early political and religious leaders of Marietta. May be the first gay couple to be buried there.

At WASHINGTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY people can browse the Ralph Schroeder and Owen Hawley Architecture Collection, a XIX and XX century photography collection of Marietta's buildings.


Owen Hawley (August 29, 1930 - July 31, 2006) was a professor at Marietta College. He lived with another man, the same way someone else would live with a wife or a husband. His partner, Ralph Schroeder (1920 - 1976), died in 1976, and Owen Hawley died in 2006. They are buried in Mound Cemetery, along with many Revolutionary War soldiers and the early political and religious leaders of Marietta. May be the first gay couple to be buried there.

Further Readings:

Persis Putnam, Marietta's First Lady: A Pioneer on the Ohio Frontier by Millie Covey Fry
Paperback: 124 pages
Publisher: North Star Books; Revised edition, 2013 edition (August 20, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0989056562
ISBN-13: 978-0989056564
Amazon: Persis Putnam, Marietta's First Lady: A Pioneer on the Ohio Frontier

It is difficult for the present-day American woman in a modern suburb to comprehend the physical rigors, the loneliness, and the mental anguish suffered by those pioneer women who left reasonably comfortable New England homes, journeyed eight hundred miles to the wooded “savage” Northwest Territory, and then settled in crude log cabins and houses. A better understanding of that period in history can be gained by studying about one such woman – Persis Rice Putnam, the wife of General Rufus Putnam, the mother of nine children, and a pioneer on the Northwest Territory and Ohio frontiers. Today we must recognize the contributions women, such as Persis (Rice) Putnam, made for the advancement of the American frontier. Persis Putnam displayed patience as she waited for her husband to return to their Massachusetts home after the American Revolutionary War and to return to their Marietta home after conflicts with Indians in the Ohio Country. She worked long hours to keep her young family fed, clothed, and together, sometimes without the benefit of an army officer’s pay, which was often late or nonexistent. She exhibited the ability to manage money as she continued to operate the farm during her husband’s frequent absences. She used her spinning wheel and her sewing needle to make garments that she sold to purchase family necessities. Her courage and determination are evident in the fact that she left a comfortable Massachusetts home, journeyed over the mountains in a covered wagon, and settled with her husband and family in a wilderness fortress. A woman, such as Persis Putnam, sustained her husband throughout his life, as he served in various town, state, and federal public offices. She was his source of encouragement and support as he participated in educational, religious, and community activities. By studying about one such pioneer woman, Persis (Rice) Putnam, perhaps we can realize and appreciate the enormity of women’s contributions in the growth and development of our community, state, and country.

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