elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Queer Places: Abbaye de Fleury

Address: Abbaye de Fleury,
45730 Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire,
France

Fleury Abbey (Floriacum) in Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, Loiret, France, founded about 640, is one of the most celebrated Benedictine monasteries of Western Europe, which possesses the relics of St. Benedict of Nursia. Its site on the banks of the Loire has always made it easily accessible from Orléans, a center of culture unbroken since Roman times. Today the abbey has over forty monks and is headed by the abbot Etienne Ricaud.

Abbo of Fleury (died 1004) a monk and abbot of Fleury was a theologian of wide-ranging intellect; his life was written by the chronicler Aimoin, also a monk of Fleury. Andrew of Fleury (writing c 1043) wrote Miracula sancti Benedicti. Hugh of Fleury (died after 1118) was a monk of Fleury known for his chronicles and other writings.



The choir of the church contains the tomb of a French monarch, Philip I of France, buried there in 1108.

Philip I of France (May 23, 1052, Champagne-et-Fontaine, Departement de la Dordogne, Aquitaine, France - Jul. 29, 1108, Melun, Departement de Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France), capetian King of the Franks or Francia, King of France, Philip I of France, Philip the the Amorous. Son of Henry I, King of the Franks and Anne of Kiev, Grandson of Robert II, King of the Franks and Constance or Arles, Yaroslav I the Wise, Grand Prince of Kiev and Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden. Philip was the husband of Bertha, the daughter of Floris I, Count of Holland and Gertrude of Saxony, daughter of Bernard II, Duke of Saxony. They married in 1072 and produced five children: Constance, wife of Hugh of Champagne & Bohemund of Antioch; Louis VI, King of the Franks; Henry b 1083, died young; Charles b 1085; Odo 1087-1096.

Philip repudiated Bertha based on the fact she was too fat, and married a lady he had fallen in love with, Bertrade de Montfort, the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux, and the wife of Count Fulk IV of Anjou. They were married 15 May 1092, even though they both had living spouses, and had three children: Philip, Count of Mantes; Fleury, Seigneur of Nangis; Cecile of France, wife of Tancred, Prince of Galilee & Pons of Tripoli.

Image illustrative de l'article Abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire

Despite being French, a Frank, and a Capetian line dating back to the Carolingians, Philip's mother chose a Greek name for her son. Phillip, as his ancestors, ruled for an unusual length of time for his era.

Philip's father died in 1060 when Philip was still a youth, and crowned at the age of seven. His mother acted as regent as the first Frankish queen, until he was fourteen. Baldwin VI of Flanders assisted her in her duties until he died in 1070, at which point Flanders was taken by Robert Frisian. Baldwin's wife received help from Philip who defeated Robert at the Battle of Cassel in 1071.

Philip was excommunicated in 1094 by Hugh, the Archbishop of Lyon, and again by Pope Urban II in 1095 for his second marriage.



Phillip made peace with William the Conqueror in 1077, allowing Phillip to annex Vexin, and take Bourges in 1100. When the role started for the First Crusade, Phillip refrained due to his conflicts with the pope over his wife, and sent his brother, Hugh of Vermandois in his stead.

Phillip died at the castle of Meulan, and at his request, was buried at the monastery of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire – instead of at St Denis with his ancestors. Phillip was succeeded by his son, Louis VI, but not without other contestants.

On March 1, 1098, King Philip I consecrated Jean, bishop of Orleans. Jean had been the lover of Phillip, and was at the time, lover of Raoul II, Archibishop of Tours (from 1986 to 1117). Jean ruled as bishop for almost forty years, and Raoul and him continued to be well known and respected.

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