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E.M. Forster (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)

Edward Morgan Forster OM CH, better known by his pen name E. M. Forster, was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist.
Born: January 1, 1879, Marylebone, United Kingdom
Died: June 7, 1970, Coventry, United Kingdom
Movies: Maurice, A Room with a View, Howards End, A Passage to India, Where Angels Fear to Tread, A Diary for Timothy, Plug
Short stories: The Machine Stops, The Other Boat, The Other Side of the Hedge, The Life to Come
Lived:
6 Melcombe Pl, London NW1, UK (51.52221, -0.162)
11 Drayton Court, Drayton Gardens, Kensington, London SW10 9RQ, UK (51.49017, -0.18257)
5 Gray’s Inn Square, London WC1R 5AH, UK (51.51967, -0.11313)
26 and 27 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AW, UK (51.52418, -0.12257)
6 Hammersmith Terrace, London W6 9TS, UK (51.48984, -0.24237) [English Heritage Building ID: 201808 (Grade II, 1954) (Map: Greater London 6)
9 Arlington Park Mansions, Sutton Ln N, Chiswick, London W4 4HE, UK (51.49012, -0.26945) (Map: Greater London 7)
Rooks Nest House, Weston Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire SG1 4DE, UK (51.92227, -0.19294)
Dryhurst, Dry Hill Park Rd, Tonbridge, Kent TN10 3BN, UK (51.20436, 0.27649)
12 King’s Parade, Cambridge CB2 1SJ, UK (52.2045, 0.11765) [English Heritage Building ID: 47521 (Grade II, 1950)]
3 Trumpington St, Cambridge CB2, UK (52.20323, 0.11749)
Palazzo Jennings Riccioli, Corso dei Tintori, 7, 50122 Firenze, Italy (43.76701, 11.26172)
Kingsley Hotel, now Thistle Holborn, 36-37 Bloomsbury Way, WC1A
19 Monument Green, Weybridge, Surrey KT13 8QT, UK (51.37389, -0.4548)
Hackhurst Ln, Abinger Hammer, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6SF, UK (51.22035, -0.43088)
5 St Lukes Pl, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73018, -74.00638)
11 Salisbury Ave, Coventry, West Midlands CV3 5DA, UK (52.38834, -1.50951)
Studied: University of Cambridge
King's College, Cambridge
Tonbridge School
Buried: Canley Garden Cemetery and Crematorium, Canley, Metropolitan Borough of Coventry, West Midlands, England

Edward Morgan Forster was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. Forster was a humanist, homosexual, lifelong bachelor. He developed a long-term loving relationship with Bob Buckingham, a married police officer (his wife's name was May), whom he met in 1930 during an evening organized by J.R. Ackerley. Buckingham was there as a friend of Harry Daley, Ackerley’s current lover and Foster’s previous. When the two met, Buckingham was 28, Forster 51. May became his friend and nursemaid. Forster included the couple in his circle, which also included the writer and arts editor of The Listener, J.R. Ackerley, the psychologist Sebastian Sprott, and, for a time, the composer Benjamin Britten. Other writers with whom Forster associated included the poet Siegfried Sassoon and the Belfast-based novelist Forrest Reid. Another of Forster’s lovers was Charles Mauron (1899-1966), a French translator of contemporary English authors. Forster died of a stroke in Coventry on June 7, 1970, at the age of 91, at the home of the Buckinghams. Maurice (1971), a homosexual love story, was published posthumously. "A happy ending was imperative," Forster writes in Maurice's Terminal Notes, even though Maurice says: "All the world's against us."
Together from 1930 to 1970: 40 years.
Edward Morgan “E.M.” Forster (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: Arlington Park Mansions, Sutton Lane, Turnham Green, E. M. Forster (1879–1970), "Novelist lived here"
Addresses:
6 Melcombe Pl, London NW1, UK (51.52221, -0.162)
11 Drayton Court, Drayton Gardens, Kensington, London SW10 9RQ, UK (51.49017, -0.18257)
5 Gray’s Inn Square, London WC1R 5AH, UK (51.51967, -0.11313)
26 and 27 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AW, UK (51.52418, -0.12257)
6 Hammersmith Terrace, London W6 9TS, UK (51.48984, -0.24237) [English Heritage Building ID: 201808 (Grade II, 1954) (Map: Greater London 6)
9 Arlington Park Mansions, Sutton Ln N, Chiswick, London W4 4HE, UK (51.49012, -0.26945) (Map: Greater London 7)
Place
E.M. Forster lived in various addresses in London:
- in 1879, 6 Melcombe Place, Marylebone, NW1 E.M. Forster was born into an Anglo-Irish and Welsh middle-class family here in Dorset Square, in a building that no longer exists.
- in 1904, 11 Drayton Court, Drayton Gardens, Kensington, SW10
- in 1909 5 Raymond Buildings, Gray’s Inn, Camden (see Gray’s Inn)
- from 1925 to 1930, 27 Brunswick Square, Bloomsbury, WC1N.
- in 1930, 6 Hammersmith Terrace, W6:
Hammersmith Terrace is a street of brick-built 17 houses in Hammersmith, London, all of which are Grade II listed houses (except no 7 which is Grade II) built in about 1770, and that has been home to several notable artists. 6 Hammersmith Terrace was the house of J.R. Ackerley (November 4, 1896 – June 4, 1967) from 1925 to 1933, and in this flat Forster first met Bob Buckingham.
- from 1930 to 1940, 26 Brunswick Square, Bloomsbury
- until 1961, 9 Arlington Park Mansions, Sutton Lane, Chiswick, W4:
Bedford Park, designed largely by Norman Shaw, was described by Nikolaus Pevsner as the first place "where the relaxed, informal mood of a market town or village was adopted for a complete speculatively built suburb.” Some of the most beautiful period mansion blocks in the area, such as Heathfield Court and Arlington Mansions, line the sides of Turnham Green – the site of the Battle of Turnham Green in 1642. Other suburbs of Chiswick include Grove Park (south of the A4, close to Chiswick railway station) and Strand on the Green, a fishing hamlet until the late XVIII century. In 1896, Bedford Park was advertised as being in Chiswick, though at that time much of it was in Acton.
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
E. M. Forster was a novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. He is known best for his ironic and well-plotted novels examining class difference and hypocrisy in early XX century British society. Forster’s humanistic impulse toward understanding and sympathy may be aptly summed up in the epigraph to his 1910 novel “Howards End”: "Only connect ...” His 1908 novel, “A Room with a View,” is his most optimistic work, while “A Passage to India” (1924) brought him his greatest success. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 13 different years. Forster was homosexual (open to his close friends, but not to the public) and a lifelong bachelor. He developed a long-term, loving relationship with Bob Buckingham, a married policeman. Forster included Buckingham and his wife May in his circle, which included J. R. Ackerley, a writer and literary editor of The Listener, the psychologist W. J. H. Sprott and, for a time, the composer Benjamin Britten. Other writers with whom Forster associated included Christopher Isherwood, the poet Siegfried Sassoon, and the Belfast-based novelist Forrest Reid.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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E.M. Forster spent some of his childhood between 1883 and 1893 living at Rooks Nest, now known as Howards, which is located towards the northern end of Weston Road.
Address: Weston Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire SG1 4DE, UK (51.92227, -0.19294)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 158120 (Grade I, 1976)
Place
Built XVII century or earlier, refronted XVIII century.
Main structure timber framed. Front wall red brick with some grey headers. Old tiled roof with 2 gabled lattice casement dormers. 2 storeys and attics; 1st floor 3 casement windows with glazing bars under cambered arches; ground floor 1 similar casement, French window on left, canted bay window on rignt. Large central chimneystack. Interior: ground floor bressummer to wide fireplace, timber framework exposed in some rooms, XVIII century fielded panelled doors.
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
The English cricketer, Robert Wilkinson was the landlord of a house named Rooks Nest near Chesfield Park, on Weston Road, Stevenage, rented between 1883 and 1893 by the author E.M. Forster and his mother Lily. They had to leave, unwillingly, when the Poyntz Stewarts, to whom the property had passed, wished it vacated. Forster had written a piece about the house, the "Rooksnest memoir", by 1894, when he was 15; and it mentions Wilkinson as landlord. “Howards End” (1910) was his novel about his childhood home; he continued to visit the house into the later 1940s, and he retained the furniture all his life.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1893 E.M. Forster, author of “Maurice,” lived at Dryhurst in Kent.
Address: Dry Hill Park Rd, Tonbridge, Kent TN10 3BN, UK (51.20436, 0.27649)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
“Maurice” (1971) by E.M. Forster was published posthumously. It is a homosexual love story which also returns to matters familiar from Forster’s first three novels, such as the suburbs of London in the home counties, the experience of attending Cambridge, and the wild landscape of Wiltshire. The novel was controversial, given that Forster’s homosexuality had not been previously known or widely acknowledged. Today’s critics continue to argue over the extent to which Forster’s sexuality and personal activities influenced his writing. “Maurice” was adapted as a film in 1987 by the Merchant-Ivory team.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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E.M. Forster was elected an honorary fellow of King’s College in January 1946, and lived for the most part in the college, doing relatively little. He declined a knighthood in 1949 and was made a Companion of Honour in 1953. Forster was President of the Cambridge Humanists from 1959 until his death. In 1969 he was made a member of the Order of Merit. Forster died of a stroke on June 7, 1970 at the age of 91, at Bob Buckingham’s home in Coventry.
Addresses:
12 King’s Parade, Cambridge CB2 1SJ, UK (52.2045, 0.11765) [English Heritage Building ID: 47521 (Grade II, 1950)]
3 Trumpington St, Cambridge CB2, UK (52.20323, 0.11749)
Place
E.M. Forster lived at two addresses in Cambridge:
- from 1900 to 1901 at 12 King’s Parade, Cambridge
Note: Edward FitzGerald lodged at 19 King’s Parade, Cambridge, as an Undergraduate of Cambridge University from 1826 to 1830.
- in 1946 at 3 Trumpington Street, Cambridge
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
At King’s College, Cambridge, between 1897 and 1901, E.M. Forster became a member of a discussion society known as the Apostles (formally named the Cambridge Conversazione Society.) Many of its members went on to constitute what came to be known as the Bloomsbury Group, of which Forster was a peripheral member in the 1910s and 1920s. There is a famous recreation of Forster’s Cambridge at the beginning of “The Longest Journey.” The Schlegel sisters of “Howards End” are based to some degree on Vanessa and Virginia Stephens, later Bell and Woolf, respectively.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Palazzo Jennings Riccioli, or Guasconi, is a palace in Florence, on Corso Tintori 7, looking at Lungarno delle Grazie.
Address: Corso dei Tintori, 7, 50122 Firenze, Italy (43.76701, 11.26172)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
On the door is a shield with the arms of Guasconi and a stone plaque that recalls that here was, until recently, the Jennings Riccioli hotel. At the beginning of the XX century, in the same place, there was the Pensione Simi, where E.M. Forster stayed while in Florence: using the same interiors, the writer modeled the "pensione Bertolini" that is the backdrop for much of his novel “A Room with a View.” In the forties of the XX century here spent a long time the writer Tommaso Landolfi.
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
A riverside residence, the Pensione Simi, at 2 Lungarno delle Grazie, was the home in 1901 of the novelist E.M. Forster and his mother. They had originally stayed at the nearby Albergo Bonciani, which Forster had liked, but his mother insisted they move because she wanted a room with a view. The Simi had a cockney landlady, who, according to Forster, “Scatters Hs like morsels.” Forster’s letter from there in 1902 epitomises the lifestyle of the pensione resident: “Oh what a viewpoint is the English hotel or Pension! Our life is where we sleep and eat, and the glimpses of Italy that I get are only accidents.” Forster returned to the Pensione Simi in each of the next two years and spent a further six years planning “A Room with a View,” during which time he wrote another Tuscany-based novel, “Where Angels Fear to Tread,” set in San Gimignano.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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E.M. Forster and his mother occasionally lodged at the former Kingsley Hotel, now Thistle Holborn (36-37 Bloomsbury Way, WC1A), a rather forlom looking Edwardian hotel (named after “Water Babies” author Charles Kingsley) as it was near the Working Men’s College in Great Ormond Street, where Forster taught Latin. At the Kingsley, Forster wrote parts of his early “Italian” novels, “Where Angels Fear to Tread” (1905) and “A Room with a View” (1908), which were based on his experiences travelling throughout that country with his mother in the early years of the century.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

From 1925 until his mother’s death at age 90 on March 11, 1945, Forster lived with her at West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, finally leaving on or around September 23, 1946.
Addresses:
19 Monument Green, Weybridge, Surrey KT13 8QT, UK (51.37389, -0.4548)
Hackhurst Ln, Abinger Hammer, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6SF, UK (51.22035, -0.43088)
Place
E.M. Forster lived in various addresses in Surrey:
- from 1904 to 1925, 19 Monument Green, Weybridge
- from 1925 to 1945, West Hackhurst, Hackurst Lane, Abinger Hammer, Dorking
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
Surrey was home to Forster for over 40 years. As a child he visited his aunt at West Hackhurst (a house designed by his architect father), in the village of Abinger. Later he inherited the lease and lived there with his mother until her death. In September, 1946, he was forced to leave the property when the landlord refused to renew the lease. He adored the Surrey Hills and was inspired to use Coldharbour and Holmbury St Mary as settings in “A Room with a View.” He wrote scripts for two local pageants: “Abinger Pageant” in 1934 (held in the grounds of the Old Rectory, with proceeds going to St James church), and “England’s Pleasant Land” in 1938. Both were collaborations with Sir Ralph Vaughan-Williams and the latter performed in aid of the Dorking and Leith Hill Preservation Society, in the grounds of Milton Court, Westcott, where reportedly the idyllic setting was interrupted by rain. His essay “Abinger Harvest,” published in 1936, was also written to celebrate the village. Forster declined a knighthood in 1949 but on his 90th birthday he received the Order of Merit. After failing health in old age he died of a stroke in Coventry in June 1970, aged 91.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

An imposing row of 15 Italianate town houses, constructed on a master design for well-to-do merchants between 1851 and 1854. The ironwork, arched doorways, long French windows, and bracketed roof cornices are especially notable.
Address: 5 St Lukes Pl, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73018, -74.00638)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Greenwich Village Historic District (Roughly bounded by W. 13th St., St. Luke's Pl., University Pl., and Washington St.), 79001604, 1979
Notable queer residents at St. Lukes Place:
• Novelist Sherwood Anderson lived at No.12 in 1923.
• Poet Marianne Moore lived at No. 14 (1918-1929); in 1925, she became editor of The Dial.
• Painters Paul Cadmus and Jared French lived at No. 5; in 1947, novelist E.M. Forster stayed with them while visiting New York.
• No. 16 was the home of Novelist Theodore Dreiser; he began writing “An American Tragedy” while living here.
• Arthur Laurents lived at No. 9 for 50 years. A year after his death, the contents of his home, furniture, set and costume designs, memorabilia and more, went up for auction. Laurents’ personal papers, including manuscripts, letters and record albums, have been given to the Library of Congress. Laurents bought the XIX-century house in about 1960 for something like $60,000. Word is that Nathan Rothschild, who owns the house next door, has bought it and plans to combine the two. The price is said to be $9 million. Proceeds from the sale of the house and Laurents’ estate went to the Laurents/Hatcher Foundation, a charitable trust that supports new plays. Tom Hatcher was Laurents’ lover until his death in 2006. Their ashes are buried by a bench in Quogue, LI, where they had a beach house.
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
The years immediately following E.M. Forster’s mother’s death were terrible for him; not only did he suffer intense grief, he also became worried that Bob Buckingham was no longer interested in him. But by 1949 the two men were on good terms again and they visited New York together, where they were photographed by George Platt Lynes. The photographs are remarkable: Forster looks every inch the eminent writer, Buckingham looks handsome and relaxed. In one, a domestic portrait of the pair, they gaze directly at one another with great humour and warmth, Buckingham shining down on Forster. For two men not publicly "out" in any way, it is an extraordinarily revealing pose.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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E.M. Forster died of a stroke on June 7, 1970 at the age of 91, at the Buckinghams’ home in Coventry.
Address: 11 Salisbury Ave, Coventry, West Midlands CV3 5DA, UK (52.38834, -1.50951)
Type: Private Property
Place
Coventry is a city and metropolitan borough in the centre of England. It was the capital of England more than once in the XV century when the seat of Government was held in Coventry. Coventry’s heritage includes the Roman Fort at Baginton, Lady Godiva, St Mary’s Guildhall (where kings and queens were entertained) and three cathedrals. Located in the county of West Midlands, historically part of Warwickshire, Coventry is the 10th largest city in England and the 13th largest UK city overall. It is also the second largest city in the West Midlands region, after Birmingham, with a population of 337,400 in 2014.
Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
For 40 years, E.M. Forster and the policeman Bob Buckingham were in a loving relationship. Buckingham was 28, Forster 51, when the two met. They shared holidays, friends, interests, and – on many weekends – a domestic and sexual life in Forster’s Brunswick Square flat. Buckingham’s wife, May – also became E.M. Forster’s friend and nursemaid. Perhaps this is not so surprising for the writer who valued personal relationships above all else, and for whom the motto "only connect" applied as much to his private life as to his novels. Buckingham was a large, good-humoured man, with a nose flattened in the boxing ring, a wide smile and a deep, loud laugh. On the day they met, he impressed Forster with his knowledge of the Thames and told him he was reading Dostoevsky. Forster invited Buckingham to his flat, and soon the two became close, with Forster taking over Buckingham’s reading list, and Buckingham thrilled to become something of a highbrow. Soon Forster was in a position to write of Buckingham’s falling "violently in liking" with him. To his friend Sebastian Sprott, Forster wrote with rather old-maidish coyness that the "spiritual feeling" between him and Buckingham had now "extended to my physique.” During these early years of their relationship, Forster seems to have at last found happiness. In his Commonplace Book, he reported that "From 51 to 53 I have been happy, and would like to remind others that their turn can come too." This was in spite of Buckingham finding a girlfriend – May Hockey, a nurse – not long after he’d met Forster. In 1932 Buckingham announced that he was to marry May; the register-office wedding took place in August, with Forster as witness. Once Buckingham was married, Forster’s worst fears seemed to come true – Buckingham became rather unreliable about their meetings, and Forster panicked, calling his rival "domineering, sly and knowing" and wondering if he should break with his lover and go abroad to escape the situation. Buckingham, ever the voice of calm sense, wrote that the two of them simply had "to go without pleasure for a bit.” Following his final stroke in May 1970, Forster was fetched from his rooms at King’s College by the Buckinghams and put to bed at their Coventry house, where he died. For most of that morning, he held May’s hand. After his death, May wrote: "I now know that he was in love with Robert and therefore critical and jealous of me and our early years were very stormy, mostly because he had not the faintest idea of the pattern of our lives and was determined that Robert should not be engulfed in domesticity. Over the years he changed us both and he and I came to love one another, able to share the joys and sorrows that came." E.M. Forster is buried at Canley Garden Cemetery and Crematorium (Cannon Hill Rd, Coventry, West Midlands CV4 7DF).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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