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elisa_rolle

Joe Orton (January 1, 1933 – August 9, 1967)

John Kingsley "Joe" Orton was an English playwright and author. His public career was short but prolific, lasting from 1964 until his death three years later.
Born: January 1, 1933, Leicester, United Kingdom
Died: August 9, 1967, Islington, United Kingdom
Books: The Orton Diaries, The Complete Plays, Fred and Madge, more
Movies: Entertaining Mr Sloane
Siblings: Leonie Orton, Marilyn Orton, Douglas Orton
Lived: 25 Noel Road, N1
Studied: Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Buried: Golders Green Crematorium, Golders Green, London Borough of Barnet, Greater London, England

From 1957 to 1959, Joe Orton (1933-1967) and Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967) worked in six-month stretches at Cadbury's to raise money for a new flat; they moved into a small, austere flat at 25 Noel Road, N1 in 1959. Carlos Be wrote a play about Orton and Halliwell's last days, “Noel Road 25: A Genius Like Us,” first performed in 2001. The terraced house is Grade II listed and was built in 1841.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.
Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NH, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)
Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.
Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello March 6, 1951 “Till you are home once more”.”
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on July 2, 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noel Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.
Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on March 14, 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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