elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Antonio “Tony” Lujan (January 2, 1879 – January 27, 1963)

Buried: Taos Pueblo Cemetery, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, New Mexico, USA

Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy American patron of the arts. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly detailed her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography Intimate Memories (1933). Her first marriage was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner in 1900. Karl died in a hunting accident leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Later she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margarett Sargent, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John “Jack” Reed (who became her lover). In 1916, Dodge married Maurice Sterne. In 1919 Dodge, her husband, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. In 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she married Tony Luhan, a Native American. The couple lived together until Mabel died, a year before Tony did.
Together from 1923 to 1962: 39 years
Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Tony Luhan (died in 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mabel Dodge Luhan House, also known as Big House and St. Teresa House, is a house in Taos, New Mexico. It was a home of artist Mabel Dodge Luhan and was a haven for artists and writers.
Address: 240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 575-751-9686
National Register of Historic Places: 78001832, 1978. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The house is "one of the earliest examples of Pueblo Revival style in Taos." It is located on Luhan Lane, off Morada Lane, in Taos. It is now used as a hotel and conference center.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy patron of the arts. She is particularly associated with the Taos art colony. Her first marriage, in 1900 at the age of 21, was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner. They had one son, and Karl died in a hunting accident two and a half years later, leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Her family sent her to Paris because she was having an affair with a prominent Buffalo gynecologist. Later that year she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly details her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography “Intimate Memories” (1933.) In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. She sailed to Europe at the end of June 1913. Her new acquaintance John Reed (Jack)—worn out from having recently organized the Paterson Pageant—travelled with her. They became lovers after arriving in Paris, where they socialized with Stein and Pablo Picasso. They moved down to the Villa Curonia, where the guests this time included Arthur Rubinstein. They returned to New York in late September 1913. In October 1913 Reed was sent to report on the Mexican Revolution by Metropolitan Magazine. Dodge followed him to Presidio, a border town, but left after a few days. Over 1914–16 a deep and continuing relationship developed between the intelligentsia of Greenwich Village and Provincetown. In 1915 she went to Provincetown with painter Maurice Sterne. She then moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate. In 1919 Dodge, her by then husband, Maurice Sterne, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. On the advice of Tony Luhan, a Native American whom she would marry in 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she bought a 12-acre (49,000 m2) property. D.H. Lawrence accepted an invitation from her to stay in Taos and he arrived, with Frieda his wife, in early September 1922. Dodge and Luhan hosted a number of influential artists and poets including Marsden Hartley, Arnold Ronnebeck, Louise Emerson Ronnebeck, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Robinson Jeffers and his wife Una, Florence McClung, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Hunter Austin, Frank Waters, Jaime de Angulo, and others. Dennis Hopper bought the Mabel Dodge Luhan House after seeing it while filming “Easy Rider.” Dodge died at her home in Taos in 1962 and was buried in Kit Carson Cemetery (Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, NM 87571). Antonio "Tony" Lujan (1879-1963) is buried at Taos Pueblo Cemetery (Taos Pueblo, NM).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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