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M. Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)

Martha Carey Thomas was an American educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College.
Born: January 2, 1857, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: December 2, 1935, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Other name: Carey Thomas
Books: The Making of a Feminist, COL PAPER READ BEFORE THE INTL
Education: Cornell University
Leipzig University
Johns Hopkins University
University of Zurich
Sorbonne
Organizations founded: Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr School
Buried: Bryn Mawr College Grounds, Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA, Plot: Cloisters of Thomas Hall (ashes)

Martha Carey Thomas was an American educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. She was part of the “Friday Night Group”: Julia Rebecca Rogers, the daughter of a prosperous Baltimore iron and steel merchant; Mary Elizabeth Garrett, daughter of John Work Garret, the president of the B&O Railroad; Elizabeth King; M. Carey Thomas and Mamie Gwinn. In 1879, accompanied by Mamie Gwinn, her “devoted companion,” Thomas went off to Europe to study and received a Ph.D. from the University of Zurich in 1882. Both then came to Bryn Mawr to teach, and Thomas was soon appointed dean. In 1885, Thomas, together with Garrett, Gwinn, King, and Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. Carey Thomas lived for many years in a relationship with Gwinn. After Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry Alfred Hodder (1866-1907) (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s Fernhurst), Thomas moved in with Garrett; they shared the campus home, living together until Garrett's death in 1915. Thomas spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France.
Together from 1878 to 1904: 26 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary "Mamie" Mackall Gwinn (1861-1940)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Mary Garrett was the daughter of John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). She became the wealthiest "spinster woman" in the country with the demise of her father. Miss Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President M. Carey Thomas $15,000,000 to be disposed of as she saw fit. Helen Horowitz's book Power and Passion suggests very strongly that the relationship was longstanding even during M. Carey Thomas’s relationship with Mamie Gwinn, and that Thomas in fact was deeply engaged with Garrett throughout it. Carey Thomas acknowledged Mary as the source of her “greatest happiness” and the one who was responsible for her “ability to do work.” Nor was the fleshly aspect missing, as Carey wrote to her “lover.” “A word or a photo does all, and the pulses beat and heart longs in the same old way.” Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother, she described it as a "loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. She left the college in the capable hands of Marion Edwards Park. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.
Together from 1904 to 1915: 11 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary Elizabeth Garrett (March 5, 1854 - 1915)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bryn Mawr College is a private women’s liberal arts college founded in 1885 in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, in Pennsylvania, four miles (6.4 km) west of Philadelphia. The phrase bryn mawr means "big hill" in Welsh.
Address: 101 N Merion Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010, USA (40.02665, -75.31439)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 610-526-5000
National Register of Historic Places: Bryn Mawr College Historic District (Morris Ave., Yarrow St. and New Gulph Rd.), 79002299, 1979. M. Carey Thomas Library is also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Martha Carey Thomas was president at Bryn Mawr College from 1894 until 1922 and remained as Dean until 1908. Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by Quakers—Swarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. Bryn Mawr was the name of an area estate granted to Rowland Ellis by William Penn in the 1680s. Ellis’s former home, also called Bryn Mawr, was a house near Dolgellau, Merionnydd, Gwynedd, Wales. The College was largely founded through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor, and its first president was James Evans Rhoads. Bryn Mawr was the first higher education institution to offer graduate degrees, including doctorates, to women. The first class included 36 undergraduate women and eight graduate students. Bryn Mawr was originally affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), but by 1893 had become non-denominational. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked it 25th in Best Liberal Arts Colleges. In 1912, Bryn Mawr became the first college in the United States to offer doctorates in social work, through the Department of Social Economy and Social Research. This department became the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research in 1970. In 1931, Bryn Mawr began accepting men as graduate students, while remaining women-only at the undergraduate level. From 1921 to 1938 the Bryn Mawr campus was home to the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, which was founded as part of the labor education movement and the women’s labor movement. The school taught women workers political economy, science, and literature, as well as organizing many extracurricular activities. On February 9, 2015, the Board of Trustees announced approval of a working group recommendation to expand the undergraduate applicant pool. Trans women and intersex individuals identifying as women may now apply for admission, while trans men may not. This official decision made Bryn Mawr the fourth women’s college in the United States to accept trans women.
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Bryn Mawr:
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), upon receiving a substantial ($2,500) traveling fellowship (Lucy Martin Donelly Fellowship) in 1951, set off to circumnavigate South America by boat.
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969), and her life partner, Martha May Eliot, devoted their lives to the care of children.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
• H.D. (1886-1961) attended Bryn Mawr College to study Greek literature, but left after only three terms due to poor grades and the excuse of poor health.
• Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist.”
• Margaret Hamilton (1871-1969), taught English at Bryn Mawr and took over as head of the school when her sister Edith retired.
• Katherine Hepburn (1907-2003), began to act while studying at Bryn Mawr College.
• Ellen Kushner (born 1955), writer of fantasy novels.
• Clara Landsberg (1873-1966), after graduating from Bryn Mawr, became a part of Hull House in Chicago, founded by Jane Addams, and shared a room with Alice Hamilton (sister of Edith.) She eventually left Hull House to teach Latin at Bryn Mawr while Edith was headmistress.
• Frieda Miller (1909-1973) was an economics professor at Bryn Mawr College.
• Tracy Dickinson Mygatt (1885-1973), writer and pacifist, co-founder with Frances M. Witherspoon of the War Resisters League, and longtime officer of the Campaign for World Government.
• Martha Carey Thomas (1857-1935), notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music, at Bryn Mawr she studied literature and the theater arts.
• Eva Palmer-Sikelianos (1874-1952), who had a long-lasting special friendship with Natalie Clifford Barney.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play How I Learned to Drive.
• Agnes E. Wells (1876-1959), one of the American’s leading educators, and a vigorous standard bearer in the women’s equal rights movement
• Frances May Witherspoon (1886-1973), writer and activist, co-founder with Tracy Dickinson Mygatt of the War Resisters League, and executive secretary of the New York Bureau of Legal Advice, a forerunner of the American Civil Liberties Union.
Life
Who: Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 – December 2, 1935)
Martha Carey Thomas was an educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. In 1882, Thomas wrote a letter to the trustees of Bryn Mawr College, requesting that she be made president of the university. She was not granted the position, however, as the trustees were concerned about her relative youth and lack of experience. Instead, Thomas entered in 1884 as the dean of the college and chair of English. Despite not receiving her desired role at Bryn Mawr, Thomas was active in the college’s administration, working closely with then President James Rhoads. According to the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: 1607–1950, by 1892 she was "acting president in all but name.” In 1885 Thomas, together with Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), Marie “Mamie” Gwinn (1861-1940), Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. In 1894, President Rhoads died, and Thomas was narrowly elected to succeed him on September 1, 1894. With respect to the President Rhoads’s recent death, Thomas was not given any ceremony. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery.” When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett. Thomas shared her campus home, the Deanery, with Garrett and together they endeavored to grow Bryn Mawr’s resources. Upon her death, Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President Thomas "a sum which would, in 1994, be close to $15,000,000" to be disposed of as she saw fit. M. Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother she described it as a "Loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. Mary Garrett left a considerable fortune to Thomas, who spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France. Thomas died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 2, 1935 of a coronary occlusion. She had returned to the city to address Bryn Mawr College on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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