elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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elisa_rolle

Thomas David Freeman-Mitford (January 2, 1909 – March 30, 1945)

Lived: Asthall Manor, Asthall, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4HW, UK (51.79999, -1.58293)
Batsford Arboretum & Estate, Batsford, Moreton-in-Marsh GL56 9QB, UK (51.99006, -1.73599)
Swinbrook House, Swinbrook, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4EL, UK (51.82794, -1.58444)
Buried: St Mary, Pebble Court, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, OX18 4DY

Early in the XX century the house was the childhood home of the Mitford siblings. Thomas Mitford, educated at Eton, was a close friend of James Lees-Milne, who was in love with him. Regular lover of Tilly Losch during her marriage to Edward James. Died as a soldier in Burma. According to Jessica’s letters, he supported British fascism and was stationed in Burma after refusing to fight in Europe.
Address: Asthall, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4HW, UK (51.79999, -1.58293)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 253558 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
Built in about 1620, Altered and Enlarged in about 1916
Asthall Manor is a gabled Jacobean Cotswold manor house in Asthall, Oxfordshire. A vernacular two-storey house with attics, built of local Cotswold limestone on an irregular H-plan with mullioned and mullioned-transomed windows and a stone-slated roof typical of the area. There are records of a house on the site since 1272 when Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, owned a house on the site worth 12d. In 1304 the curia, garden and fish pond were valued at 10 shillings. The core of the current building at Asthall was built for Sir William Jones on the site of the mediaeval hall. In 1688 the estate was sold to Sir Edmund Fettiplace; it stayed in branches of the same family for the next 130 years when it was sold to John Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale in 1810. During their 116-year tenure the Freeman-Mitfords made many alterations to the house including the installation in 1899 of an electric power system powered by a water turbine fed by the River Windrush. The architect Charles Bateman altered and enlarged the house in 1916. In 1920 a former barn was converted to a ballroom and joined to the main house by a cloister. In 1926 the house was sold to Thomas Hardcastle and was purchased by the current owners in 1997 on the death of Hardcastle’s son. The garden at Asthall Manor covers 6 acres (2.4 ha). It was created for the current owners of Asthall by Julian and Isobel Bannerman (best known for their work for Prince Charles at Highgrove House) and includes traditional gardens of herbaceous borders and lawns, contemporary parterres and areas of wild woodland and wildflowers running down to water-meadows by the River Windrush. Asthall Manor remains primarily a private family home, although the ballroom is occasionally used for functions and Asthall Manor’s garden provides the setting for "On Form,” a biennial exhibition of contemporary sculpture in stone as well as small outdoor musical events.
Life
Who: Thomas Mitford (January 2, 1909 – March 30, 1945) and (George) James Henry Lees-Milne (August 6, 1908 – December 28, 1997)
David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale (2nd creation), father of the Mitford sisters, inherited Asthall Manor on the death of his father in 1916 and in 1919 moved his family there from Batsford Park. The youngest of the Mitford sisters Deborah, later Duchess of Devonshire, was born at Asthall in 1920. Her sister Diana had an appendectomy on the spare-bedroom table. The Mitfords were great socialites, and Asthall hosted frequent hunting and shooting weekend parties, regular guests included Clementine Churchill, Frederick Lindemann and Walter Sickert. Nancy Mitford’s fictional Alconleigh in “The Pursuit of Love” is based largely on Asthall, and family life there is described in Jessica Mitford’s autobiographical “Hons and Rebels.” Redesdale had never planned to make Asthall Manor a permanent home, and in 1926 the family moved into nearby Swinbrook House which Redesdale had had built on the site of a derelict farm.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The estate of Batsford Park was inherited in 1886 by Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale. He had travelled widely in Asia and developed the garden as a "wild" landscape with natural plantings inspired by Chinese and Japanese practice. The house was sold in 1919 to Gilbert Alan Hamilton Wills, later the 1st Lord Dulverton and in 1984 Batsford Park was donated to a charitable trust founded by the 2nd Lord Dulverton to ensure the future of the arboretum.
Address: Batsford, Moreton-in-Marsh GL56 9QB, UK (51.99006, -1.73599)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Phone: +44 1386 701441
English Heritage Building ID: 128635 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Built 1888-92, Design by Sir Ernest George and Peto
Ashlar~ concrete tile roof with limestone gable coping and stack. Plan: main body with two wings projecting forward right and left. Stone polygonal stair turret from left wall~ 2- storey central gabled porch. Service wing set back from facade on left. Cotswold Elizabethan style. 3-storey main body; wings 3 storeys and attic. Buttresses to main body and wings. 1:8:2 windowed. All stone ovolo-moulded casements. Third floor windows to main body and left wall of right wing all 3-light windows with stilted heads. Hall on left of the main body lit by tall 2-light mullioned and transomed windows with stilted heads, similar lights in left wall of right wing. Other windows 2, 3 and 4-1ight with mullions and transoms. String courses above and below third floor windows of main body, another over tall windows to central hall. Decorative rainwater heads dated 1889. Gabled central porch with lion finial at apex and eroded finials at eaves. Large heraldic shield over panelled round-headed porch door in moulded surround with Tudor Rose decoration. Saddleback coping and hollow pointed finials at eaves. Numerous multi-angular stacks with moulded caps and skirtings. Bell with ogee arched metal canopy over, attached to axial stack on left wing of main body. 4-storey service wing left of similar style to main body with 1 and 2 storey outbuildings far left. Interior: Large central hall open to first floor with stone balustrade to stairs and gallery and heraldic glass in windows: ballroom in right wing with enclosed wooden corner stairs ornate stone fireplaces in all major rooms. King Edward VII stayed here.
Life
Who: Thomas Mitford (January 2, 1909 – March 30, 1945)
Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale died in 1916 and was succeeded by David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale, who was father of the famous Mitford sisters. They lived at Batsford during World War I, and Nancy Mitford based the early part of her novel “Love in a Cold Climate” on their time at Batsford. Thomas Mitford, known as "Tom". Educated at Eton, where he was a close friend of James Lees-Milne. In 1919 the estate was sold to cover death duties to Gilbert Wills, 1st Baron Dulverton, an heir to the W.D. & H.O. Wills tobacco fortune. His wife Victoria further developed the garden and specimen tree plantings. After neglect during World War II the arboretum was revived by (Frederick) Anthony Hamilton Wills, 2nd Baron Dulverton (1915–1992), who succeeded in 1956. He consolidated and expanded the collections and brought Batsford into international repute. To ensure the survival of the arboretum he donated Batsford Park to a charitable trust in 1984. Apart from the arboretum, the remainder of the 5,000-acre (20 km2) historic Batsford Estate is privately owned by (Gilbert) Michael Hamilton Wills, 3rd Baron Dulverton (born 1944).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale had Swinbrook House built 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of the village, where the family moved in 1926
Address: Swinbrook, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4EL, UK (51.82794, -1.58444)
Type: Private Property
Place
Swinbrook House was badly damaged in a fire in 2012. The blaze began in the drawing room and firemen said it affected “a substantial amount of the property.” The mansion was built in 1926 by the second Baron Redesdale, David Freeman-Mitford, the father of Nancy, Pamela, Diana, Unity, Jessica and Deborah Mitford. The youngest of the clan, now the Dowager Duchess of Devonshire, owns a nearby pub in the village - The Swan - which was left to the Mitford family by the previous owner. Swinbrook is a village on the River Windrush, about 2 miles (3 km) east of Burford in Oxfordshire. The village is in the civil parish of Swinbrook and Widford. Widford is a hamlet about 1⁄2 mile (800 m) west of Swinbrook. The 2011 Census recorded Swinbrook and Widford's parish population as 139. The Church of England parish church of Saint Mary the Virgin dates from about 1200. Its unusual open-sided bell-tower was added in 1822. The church is noted for its XVII-century Fettiplace monuments. Four of six daughters of David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale, are buried in the parish churchyard: Nancy, Unity, and Diana are buried side by side, while Pamela is buried northwest of the tower. Also Tom Mitford (January 2, 1909 –March 30, 1945) is buried at St Mary (Pebble Court, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, OX18 4DY). St Mary's has also a monument to the officers and men of the Royal Navy submarine HMS P514, and especially its commander, Lieutenant W.A. Phillimore, whose parents lived at Swinbrook. In 1942 P514 failed to identify herself to the Royal Canadian Navy minesweeper HMCS Georgian. The Canadian ship therefore assumed the submarine to be an enemy vessel and rammed P514, sinking her with the loss of all hands.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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