elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Pola Negri (January 3, 1897 – August 1, 1987)

Pola Negri was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles.
Born: January 3, 1897, Lipno, Lipno County, Poland
Died: August 1, 1987, San Antonio, Texas, United States
Height: 1.52 m
Spouse: Prince Serge Mdivani (m. 1927–1931), Count Eugeniusz Dambski (m. 1919–1922)
Parents: Eleonora Kiełczewska, Jerzy Chalupec
Lived: 907 Fifth Avenue
Studied: Vaganova Academy of Russian Ballet
Buried: Calvary Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Main Mausoleum, Block 56, Crypt E-19

Pola Negri was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles. Negri was romantically linked at various times to Polish Count Eugene Dambski, Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino, and Adolf Hitler. Most of these affairs were for publicity value only, however, as her true passion was for other women. Tallulah Bankhead dismissed Negri as “The biggest phony in Hollywood, dahling! A lying lesbo, a Polish publicity hound. Had a mustache and couldn’t act her way out of a paper bag!” In the 40s, Pola Negri became close friends with Margaret West, an oil heiress and vaudeville actress that she had originally met in the 1930s. The two became housemates, and moved from Los Angeles to San Antonio, Texas, in 1957. Negri would live with Margaret West until the latter's death in 1963. After West's death, Negri moved out of the home she had shared with West into a townhome located at 7707 Broadway in San Antonio. She spent the remainder of her years there, largely out of the public eye.
Together from (around) 1940 to 1963: 23 years.
Apolonia Chałupiec aka Pola Negri (January 3, 1897 – August 1, 1987)
Margaret West (September 10, 1903 – July 29, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

While other great mansions along Central Park were being converted to museums or condominiums, the Henry Cook house remained intact. In 1977 it was purchased by highly-successful businessman Victor Shafferman for $600,000. Shafferman died in 2009 leaving No. 973 Fifth Avenue with much of the original interior detailing: plaster moldings, marble mantles and paneled rooms.
Address: 5th Ave, New York, NY 10075, USA
Type: Private Property
Notable queer residents at Fifth Avenue:
- No. 973 Fifth Avenue: Victor Shafferman (November 8, 1941- October 19, 2009) Henry H. Cook made his fortune in railroads and banking. When he began planning to build his enormous mansion in 1880 at the north corner of 5th Avenue and 78th Street across from Central Park he had no intentions of commercial interlopers in his neighborhood. That year Cook purchased the entire block from Fifth Avenue to Madison Avenue, between 78th and 79th Streets for $500,000 and laid out stringent building restrictions: no structure other than a private home could be built on what was known as the Cook Block. The restrictions survive today. The Cook and Whitney houses were completed in 1907, architect Stanford White. By 1912 James B. Duke had demolished the original Cook mansion to erect his own white marble mansion that survives today. Henry Cook left the house to his daughter but, according to Christopher Gray, she rarely used it. In 1919 Cook’s daughter sold the house to the socially-prominent Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fuller Feder. A year after their daughter Odette’s debut, a glittering reception was held on Dec. 26, 1921 for her wedding to the dashing British Royal Air Force Major J. Ronald McCrindle. (Eight years later Odette filed for divorce.) Mrs. Feder continued to entertain lavishly in the house until her husband’s death on 11 May, 1944. Mr. Feder lived there with his wife and family, 29 years later in 1948, the family sold it to the Mormon Church. The Mormons used it as a training center. In 1978, they sold it to Victor Shafferman, a real estate investor, for a reported $600,000. The estate of Victor Shafferman, who died in 2009, sold 973 5th Avenue in 2011 for $49 million.
- No. 907 Fifth Avenue: In the 1950s Pola Negri resided at 907 Fifth Avenue. Neighbors reported that a great portrait of Valentino hung in a prominent place in her foyer. By the end of the decade, she had moved into the San Antonio mansion of oil heiress Margaret West. When Miss West died in 1963, she willed Pola her jewelry and lifetime use of her Texas house. When Pola died in 1987, she was still living in Texas. The twelve-story, limestone-faced building is located at Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street on a site once occupied by the 1893 residence of James A. Burden, which had been designed by R. H. Robertson. The apartment block, built in 1916, was the first apartment building to replace a private mansion on Fifth Avenue above 59th Street. It was converted to a cooperative in 1955. J. E. R. Carpenter was the architect; he would be called upon to design many of the luxury apartment buildings that gave a new scale to Fifth Avenue in the ‘teens and twenties of the XX century. The building won him the 1916 gold medal of the American Institute of Architects. The building has the aspect of an Italian Renaissance palazzo, built around a central court. Its first four floors are lightly rusticated; deep quoins carry the rusticated feature up the corners to the boldly projecting top cornice. A strong secondary cornice above the fourth floor once made a conciliatory nod to the cornice lines of the private houses that flanked it, whose owners had fought its construction in court. When it opened, there were two twelve-room apartments on most floors.
- No. 820 Fifth Avenue: a luxury cooperative in Manhattan, New York City, located on Fifth Avenue at the Northeast corner of East 63rd Street on the Upper East Side. The 12 story limestone-clad neo-Italian Renaissance palazzo is one of the most expensive and exclusive apartment houses in the city. It was designed by Starrett & Van Vleck and built by Fred T. Ley in 1916. The land upon which it was built was previously occupied by the Progress Club. The frontage was 100.5 feet on Fifth Avenue and 100 feet on 63rd Street. Construction cost was 1 million dollars, exclusive of the land (which cost another million.) The building comprises 12 apartments. The fourth floor is one of only a couple of units at 820 that have changed hands multiple times in the last 10 or 20 years. For many years, the 18-room sprawler was owned by poet, philanthropist, and paper heiress Louise Crane whose family concern, Crane & Co., manufactures high-grade stationary and has provided the paper on which U.S. currency has been printed for nearly 150 years. Crane was about as old as money gets in America young country. After Crane’s death in 1997, the apartment was sold to khaki pants king Tommy Hilfiger who somehow scooched by the notoriously fussy and stringent board and reportedly scooped the apartment up in the spring of 1999 for around $10,000,000. After jumping through all the board’s crazy hoops and demands and finally finessing his way into the building, Hilfiger did the unthinkable, he quickly changed his mind about living up in 820 and flipped the apartment back onto the market at a much higher price than he paid.
- No. 536 Fifth Avenue: With her partner, Mattie Edwards Hewitt, a successful freelance home and garden photographer in her own right, Francis Benjamin Johnston opened a studio in New York in 1913 at 536 Fifth Avenue, and moved in with her mother and aunt. She lectured at New York University on business for women and they produced a series of studies of New York architecture through the 1920s. In early 1920 her mother died in New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Pola Negri (1899-1987), Polish stage and film actress, is buried at Calvary Cemetery (4201 Whittier Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90023). In the early 1940s, she became close friends with Margaret West, an oil heiress and vaudeville actress that she had originally met in the 1930s. The two became housemates, and moved from Los Angeles to San Antonio, Texas, in 1957. Margaret West (1903-1963) is buried at Mission Park Cemetery (1700 SE Military Dr, San Antonio, TX 78214). Also Ramón Novarro (1899–1968) is buried at Calvary Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4940134.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Tags: days of love, queer places
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments