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Stephen Decatur (January 5, 1779 – March 22, 1820)

Stephen Decatur, Jr. was a United States naval officer and commodore notable for his naval victories in the early 19th century.
Born: January 5, 1779, Sinepuxent, Maryland, United States
Died: March 22, 1820, Washington, D.C., United States
Buried: Saint Peter's Episcopal Churchyard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Award: Congressional Gold Medal
Battles and wars: Quasi-War, Second Battle of Tripoli Harbor, more
Books: CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE LAT
Lived: Decatur House, 748 Jackson Pl., NW., Washington, DC 20006-4907, USA (38.89994, -77.03845)
Studied: Episcopal Academy
University of Pennsylvania

Stephen Decatur was one of America’s first naval heroes. As a commander, he endured the loss of his closest friend and companion, Richard Somers. Battling the Barbary Pirates in 1804, Somers volunteered to blow up the pirates’ coastal stronghold. Instead, it was Somers and his crew that went up in smoke, while Decatur watched helplessly from the deck of his own vessel. Prior to the fatal mission, Somers had given Decatur a gold ring, which the aggrieved seaman wore for the rest of his life. At the direction of his father, Decatur attended the Protestant Episcopal Academy, at the time an all-boys school that specialized in Latin, mathematics and religion; however, Decatur had not applied himself adequately, and barely graduated from the academy. He then enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania in 1795 for one year where he better applied himself and focused on his studies. At the university, Decatur met and became friends with Charles Stewart and Richard Somers, who would later become naval officers themselves.
They met in 1795 and remained friends until Somers’ death in 1804: 9 years
Richard Somers (1778 or 1779 – September 4, 1804)
Stephen Decatur, Jr. (January 5, 1779 – March 22, 1820)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Decatur House is a historic home in Washington, D.C., named after its first owner and occupant Stephen Decatur.
Address: 748 Jackson Pl., NW., Washington, DC 20006-4907, USA (38.89994, -77.03845)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 6.00-21.00, Saturday 8.00-19.00, Sunday 9.00-21.00
Phone: +1 202-842-0917
National Register of Historic Places: 66000858, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1818, Design by Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764-1820)
Decatur House is one of the oldest surviving homes in Washington, D.C., and one of only three remaining houses in the country designed by neoclassical architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Completed for naval hero Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan, the Federal Style house is located northwest of Lafayette Square, at the southwest corner of Jackson Place and H Street, near the White House. A museum, it now serves as the National Center for White House History, of the White House Historical Association. It was successively home to Henry Clay, Martin Van Buren, Edward Livingston, who collectively made Decatur House the unofficial residence of the Secretary of State from 1827 to 1833, each renting the house while they served in that post. In 1836 John Gadsby and his wife Providence moved into the house and brought their house slaves. They built a two-story structure at the back which became the slave quarters for those workers, who previously lived in the main house. This structure remains as one of the few examples of slave quarters in urban areas. It is physical evidence of African Americans’ having been held "in bondage in sight of the White House." Following John Gadsby’s death, the home was again rented to a series of prominent tenants. In order, these tenants were Vice President George M. Dallas, publisher and former Mayor of Washington Joseph Gales, Congressmen and brothers John A. King and James G. King, Rep. William Appleton, Speaker of the House James Lawrence Orr and Sen. Judah Benjamin. During the Civil War it was used as Army offices and then it sat empty for 6 years. Decatur House was purchased in 1872 by Edward Fitzgerald Beale, a frontiersman and explorer who later became a rancher and diplomat. Beale’s daughter-in-law, Marie, bequeathed Decatur House to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1956. Decatur House, now a museum, is located at 748 Jackson Place, N.W., on President’s Park (Lafayette Park.) The lower floor is kept in the style of the early XIX century while the upper floor shows more modern renovations of the early XX century. Because of the centrality of its location, the status of its residents, and the fact that urban slaves worked there across from the White House, the house now contains more material interpreting African American history. Among the compelling stories is that of Charlotte Dupuy, who in 1829 sued her master Henry Clay, then Secretary of State, for her freedom and that of her two children. While she lost her court case, Clay finally freed Dupuy and her daughter in 1840, and her son in 1844. A special exhibit on African American history through 1965 has recently been added to the museum and its website.
Life
Who: Stephen Decatur, Jr. (January 5, 1779 – March 22, 1820)
Stephen Decatur was one of America’s first navel heroes. He endured the loss of his closest friend and companion, Richard Somers (ca. 1778-1804, killed during a daring assault on Tripoli), whom he met at college in 1795; prior to a fatal mission, Somers had given Decatur a gold ring, which Decatur wore for the rest of his life.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Society Hill (313 Pine St, Philadelphia, PA 19106) is buried Stephen Decatur, Jr (1779-1820), United States naval officer and commodore notable for his many naval victories in the early XIX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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