elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
elisa_rolle
elisa_rolle

Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 - January 8, 1951)

Ogden Codman Jr. was an American architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles, and co-author with Edith Wharton of The Decoration of Houses, which became a standard in American interior design.
Born: January 19, 1863, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 8, 1951, France
Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Books: The Decoration of Houses, The Decoration of Houses - Scholar's Choice Edition
People also search for: Edith Wharton, Richard Morris Hunt, Francis L.V. Hoppin, Seth C. Bradford, Lucy Wharton Drexel
Lived: Codman House, 34 Codman Rd, Lincoln, MA 01773, USA (42.41838, -71.33083)
7 East 96th Street, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78782, -73.95489)
Château de Grégy, 7 Allée du Château, 77166 Évry-Grégy-sur-Yerre, France (48.65295, 2.63185)
Villa Leopolda, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France (43.70397, 7.3111)
Buried: Lincoln Cemetery, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA

Ogden Codman, Jr. was an American architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles, and co-author with Edith Wharton of The Decoration of Houses (1897). Codman spent his youth from 1875 to 1884 at Dinard, an American resort colony in France, and on returning to America in 1884, studied at the MIT. Wharton became one of his first Newport clients for her home there, Land's End. Subsequently she introduced Codman to Cornelius Vanderbilt II, who hired him to design the second and third floor rooms of his Newport summer home, The Breakers. In 1907, Codman built the Codman-Davis House in Washington, D.C. for his cousin Martha Codman, one of the few intact homes that he designed. This included a carriage house, now the Apex Night Club, ironically a gay club. Although a noted homosexual, on 8 October, 1904, Codman married one of his commissioner, Leila Griswold Webb, widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, who died unexpectedly in 1910. In 1920, Codman left New York to return to France, where he spent the rest of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer: it is his masterpiece, the fullest surviving expression of his esthetic.
Together from 1904 to 1910: 6 years.
Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (November 12, 1856 - January 21, 1910)
Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 - January 8, 1951)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Codman House (also known as The Grange) is a historic house set on a 16-acre (6.5 ha) estate at 34 Codman Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts.
Address: 34 Codman Rd, Lincoln, MA 01773, USA (42.41838, -71.33083)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone:+1 617-994-6671
National Register of Historic Places: 74000373, 1974
Place
Built in approximately 1735 in the Georgian style
Thanks to a gift by Dorothy Codman, Codman Estate has been owned by Historic New England since 1969 and is open to the public June 1–October 15 on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month. The main house was originally built by Chambers Russell I. It was enlarged in the 1790s to its current three-story Federal style by John Codman, brother-in-law of Chambers Russell III and executor of his estate. This was perhaps with some involvement of noted American architect Charles Bulfinch. The interior is extensively furnished with portraits, memorabilia, and art works collected in Europe. Various rooms preserve the decorative schemes of every era, including those of noted interior designer Ogden Codman, Jr. The former carriage house, built c. 1870 to a design by Snell and Gregerson, is also located on the property. Until the 1980s, it was original to its use as a stable and an early auto garage and contained many artifacts of both. A few of those artifacts continue to be on display in the carriage house including an early gas pump and a large machine powered lathe. The grounds have been farmed almost continuously since 1735 and now also include an Italian garden, circa 1899, with perennial beds, statuary, and a reflecting pool filled with waterlilies, as well as an English cottage garden, circa 1930.
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
Codman was born to Ogden Codman, Sr. (of Boston and the Codman House) and the former Sarah Bradlee in Boston, Massachusetts. He spent his youth from 1875 to 1884 at Dinard, an American resort colony in France, and on returning to America in 1884, studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was influenced in his career by two uncles, John Hubbard Sturgis (architect) and Richard Ogden (a decorator), and admired Italian and French architecture of the XVI, XVII, and XVIII centuries, as well as English Georgian architecture and the colonial architecture of Boston. While he died at Evry-Gregy-sur-Yerre in France, he is buried at Lincoln Cemetery (Lincoln, MA 01773).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Although Ogden Codman, Jr. had been born in Boston, he grew up in Paris and his love for all things French was deep-rooted.
Addresses:
Archer M. Huntington house, 1083 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78361, -73.95848)
Lucy D. Dahlgren house, 15 East 96th Street, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.7877, -73.95455)
Ogden Codman house, 7 East 96th Street, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78782, -73.95489)
American Irish Historical Society, 991 Fifth Avenue, NY 10128, USA (40.7777, -73.96278)
Acquavella Galleries, 18 East 79th Street, NY 10128, USA (40.77623, -73.96266)
Place
- Archer M. Huntington house, 1083 Fifth Avenue: Archer Milton Huntington (1870-1955) was the son of Arabella (née Duval) Huntington and the stepson of railroad magnate and industrialist Collis P. Huntington. A lifelong friend of the arts, he is known for his scholarly works in the field of Hispanic Studies and for founding The Hispanic Society of America in New York City. While Huntington was busy establishing and donating museums he also set to work remodeling his home. The decorator Ogden Codman, Jr. was extremely popular among the moneyed set and Huntington commissioned him to renovate No. 1083. In 1913 he began transforming the façade into a limestone-clad XVIII century French townhouse. A four-story bowed front with a rusticated base culminated in a deep balcony behind a stone balustrade at the fifth floor. A stately mansard roof with copper trim composed the sixth floor. Tall French doors above the entrance were finished with a segmental arched pediment. Codman made use of Huntington’s vacant plot behind the property to enlarge the house with an addition creating an L-shape that extended to East 89th Street. The second floor was dedicated solely to entertaining. The Huntingtons’ living quarters were on the third floor and the top two floors were outfitted as servants’ rooms – enough to accommodate 25 servants. The outward appearance of Archer Milton Huntington’s stately mansion is essentially unchanged since Ogden Codman, Jr. revamped it in 1914. While the three other homes purchased by Huntington in 1902 have been demolished and replaced with a sterile white brick apartment building, No. 1083 elegantly survives. Currently the National Academy Museum and School, notable queer alumni and faculty: Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), Jasper Johns (born 1930), Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008), John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), Cy Twombly (1928-2011).
- Lucy Drexel Dahlgren house, 15 East 96th Street: The Lucy Drexel Dahlgren House is a historic home located at 15 East 96th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues on the border between the Carnegie Hill and East Harlem neighborhoods of the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1915-16, and was designed by Ogden Codman, Jr. in the French Renaissance Revival stye for Lucy Wharton Drexel Dahlgren, a daughter of financier Joseph William Drexel (1833-1888) and Lucy Wharton (1841-1912.) She was the sister of Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (1868-1944.) The limestone house is a companion to Codman’s own residence down the street at 7 East 96th Street, which he designed for himself and had built in 1912-13. The AIA Guide to New York City describes the Dahlgren house as "magisterial" and "disciplined." It features "gentle restications and bas-reliefs." The extremely wealthy and socially prominent Dahlgren spent little time in the house. It was later occupied for many years by Pierre Cartier, the founder of the Cartier’s jewelry store. Apparently, Dahlgren rented the house to Cartier from 1922 on, until she sold it to him in 1927. In 1945, on his retirement, Cartier sold the house to the Roman Catholic Church of St. Francis de Sales, which used it as a convent for the nuns who taught at the church’s parochial school. In 1981 the church sold the house to a private owner, who restored it. It is located within the Upper East Side Historic District.
- Ogden Codman house, 7 East 96th Street: In 1907 Codman purchased the lot at 7 East 96th Street, still several blocks north of the area where the main thrust of mansion building was going on. While they were still contemplating their new home, Codman’s wife of only six years died in 1910. Now alone, Codman set about designing the elegant residence his wife would never share. Completed in 1913, it was a slice of Paris set down on 96th Street. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission later described the facade of number 7 as being "full of gaiety and frivolous vitality" and further, "on approaching the house, Paris and the Champs-Élysées immediately come to mind." Ogden Codman lived in his grand home with six servants and his chauffeur until 1920 when he left for his beloved Paris. In December of that year he negotiated a lease by cable to rent the house furnished to George Edward Kent. Kent paid an annual rent of $25,000. The Manhattan Country School purchased the house in 1965. In 2000 a restoration of the façade, including slate roof and copper dormer replacement, and masonry cleaning was completed. The interiors remain almost perfectly intact. The little slice of Paris created by Ogden Codman, Jr. looks much today as it did when he moved in nearly a century ago.
- American Irish Historical Society, 991 Fifth Avenue: Completed in 1901, the lavish Beaux-Arts mansion on Fifth Avenue was a showplace. With a rusticated limestone base, the first three floors bowed out creating a stone-balustraded balcony at the fourth floor. The architects James R. Turner and William. G. Killian chose ruddy-colored brick with carved limestone detailing for the middle three floors, capping it with a dramatic mansard roof with three elegant copper-clad dormers. Here Mary A. King, unmarried daughter of John A. King, lived with her five Irish servants for only a few years until her death. Banker David Crawford Clark purchased the home on April 16, 1906. A member of the firm Clark, Dodge & Co., Clark and his wife were socially prominent and in 1911 commissioned Ogden Codman, Jr., to redesign the interiors. In 1939 the American Irish Historical Society purchased the residence for $145,000 and moved in a year later after renovations were completed. By 2006, the house was what the president-general of the Society, Dr. Kevin Cahill, called “in a state of utter disrepair.” The basement regularly flooded, the electrical and plumbing systems were outdated and the masonry required overall restoration. An aggressive, two-year restoration and renovation was initiated under the direction of Joseph Pell Lombardi. In some cases, the walls were taken down to the studs and lath before the building could be brought into the XX Century and returned to its original grandeur. Original drawings by Odgen Codman Jr., maintained in the New York City Department of Buildings, were consulted to ensure accuracy. The $5 million restoration was completed in March 2008. Today the rich Beaux-Arts mansion with its equally-rich society history sits solidly in the XXI Century while losing none if its century-old architectural integrity.
- J. Woodward Haven House now Acquavella Galleries, 18 East 79th Street: Acquavella Galleries is an art gallery in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Since 1967, the gallery has occupied an elegant five-story French neo-classical townhouse at 18 East 79th, once the New York outpost of London art firm founded by Joseph Duveen. Today, a range of XX century art is represented, including Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism.
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
Ogden Codman, Jr.’s New York clients included John D. Rockefeller, Jr., for whom he designed the interiors of the famous Rockefeller family mansion of Kykuit in 1913, and Frederick William Vanderbilt, for whom he designed the interiors for his mansion in Hyde Park, New York, and his house on Fifth Avenue. He also collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue as well as on the design of The Mount, her house in Lenox, Massachusetts. His suave and idiomatic suite of Régence and Georgian parade rooms for entertaining are preserved in the townhouse at 991 Fifth Avenue, now occupied by the American Irish Historical Society. His French townhouse in the manner of Gabriel at 18 East 79th Street, for J. Woodward Haven (1908–09) is now occupied by Acquavella Galleries. All told, Codman designed 22 houses to completion, as well as the East Wing of the Metropolitan Club in New York. He also began the trend of lowering the townhouse entrance door from elevated stairways to the basement level. He designed a series of three houses in Louis XIV style at 7 (his own residence), 12, and 15 East 96th Street from 1912 to 1916.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Château de Grègy is a château in Évry-Grégy-sur-Yerre, Seine-et-Marne, France.
Address: 7 Allée du Château, 77166 Évry-Grégy-sur-Yerre, France (48.65295, 2.63185)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Saturday 9.00-11.45, Monday and Friday 13.30-17.30
Phone:+33 1 64 05 28 16
Place
Built in 1620
The first château was built by Antoine de Brennes and only two towers remain. Antoine de Clairambault rebuilt the central portion at the beginning of the XIX century, and added wings connecting the tower of a former church to the main building. American decorator and architect Ogden Codman, Jr. owned the château in the XX century, adding its entry pavilions. The chateau is situated along the Yerres River, and is reached via the Pont Saint-Pierre (XVII century.)
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
In 1920, Ogden Codman, Jr. left New York to return to France, where he spent the last thirty-one years of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer. Codman died at age 87 in 1951. His architectural drawings and papers are collected at the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University; the Codman Family papers are also held by Historic New England and the Boston Athenaeum.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Villa La Leopolda is a large detached villa in Villefranche-sur-Mer, in the Alpes-Maritimes department on the French Riviera. The villa is situated in 18 acres of grounds.
Address: Villefranche-sur-Mer, France (43.70397, 7.3111)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built from 1929 to 1931, Design by Ogden Codman, Jr. (1863-1951)
Villa La Leopolda in its current incarnation was built on an estate once owned by King Leopold II of Belgium. The villa has had several notable owners including Gianni and Marella Agnelli, Izaak and Dorothy J. Killam, and since 1987 by Edmond (1932–1999) and Lily Safra, who inherited the villa after her husband’s death. King Leopold II of Belgium had made the previous estate a present for his mistress Blanche Zélia Joséphine Delacroix, also known as Caroline Lacroix, and it derives its name from him. After Leopold’s death, Blanche Delacroix was evicted, and his nephew, King Albert I, became its owner. During WWI it was used as a military hospital. In 1919, Thérèse Vitali, comtesse de Beauchamp, acquired the property and commissioned modifications. The American architect Ogden Codman, Jr. purchased the dozen existing structures that made up the property including two peasant cottages, and began his architectural magnum opus in 1929. It was complete by 1931, however financial difficulties (and his lavish expenditures) precluded his being able to live in it, so he rented it out to various well-heeled tenants. One famous English couple tried to lease it, but insisted on making changes that were contrary to Codman’s aesthetic objectives and strict list of protective clauses. Negotiations in a Paris Hotel room broke down over the many restrictions Codman imposed, and Ogden’s response was: "I regret that the House of Codman is unable to do business with the House of Windsor." Codman’s extensive designs and construction gave the estate, once a series of unrelated buildings, its current appearance. His neo-Palladian vision, coupled with his in-depth knowledge of historical precedent, resulted in the construction of a spectacular villa with extensive gardens and landscaping. Floor plans, letters, records, and stereo glass-plate views of the newly completed property still exist in the collections of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (aka "Historic New England.”)
Life
Who: Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 – January 8, 1951)
In 1920, Ogden Codman, Jr. left New York to return to France, where he spent the last thirty-one years of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer, which he created by assembling a number of vernacular structures and their sites: it is his masterpiece, the fullest surviving expression of his esthetic.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This journal is friends only. This entry was originally posted at http://reviews-and-ramblings.dreamwidth.org/4950577.html. If you are not friends on this journal, Please comment there using OpenID.
Tags: days of love, queer places
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments