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John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)

John Singer Sargent was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury.
Born: January 12, 1856, Florence
Died: April 14, 1925, London, United Kingdom
Period: American Renaissance
Influenced by: James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Diego Velázquez, more
Parents: Mary Sargent, FitzWilliam Sargent
Lived: Morgan Hall, London Rd, Fairford, Gloucestershire GL7 4AU, UK (51.70796, -1.77278
31-33 Tite St, Chelsea, London SW3 4JA, UK (51.48507, -0.15977) [English Heritage Building ID: 424570 (Grade II, 1969)
12-14 The Avenue, Fulham Rd, London, UK (51.49334, -0.16938)
Russell House, B4632, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12 7BU, UK (52.03685, -1.86585) [English Heritage Building ID: 400987 (Grade II, 1959)]
Farnham House, Church St, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12, UK (52.03469, -1.86374) [English Heritage Building ID: 399309 (Grade II, 1959)]
73 Rue Notre Dame des Champs, 75006 Paris, France (48.84322, 2.33189)
41 Boulevard Berthier, 75017 Paris, France (48.88744, 2.29916)
Studied: École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts
Buried: Brookwood Cemetery, Brookwood, Woking Borough, Surrey, England, GPS (lat/lon): 51.29772, -0.62469

John Singer Sargent was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury. Sargent was extremely private regarding his personal life, although the painter Jacques-Émile Blanche said after his death that Sargent's sex life "was notorious in Paris, and in Venice, positively scandalous. He was a frenzied bugger." Some scholars have suggested that Sargent was homosexual. He had personal associations with Prince Edmond de Polignac and Count Robert de Montesquiou. His male nudes reveal complex and well-considered artistic sensibilities about the male physique and male sensuality; this can be particularly observed in his portrait of Thomas E. McKeller (an African American elevator operator he befriended), but also in Tommies Bathing, nude sketches for Hell and Judgement, and his portraits of young men. However, there were many friendships with women, as well, and a similar suppressed sensualism informs his female portrait and figure studies. Art historian Deborah Davis suggests that Sargent's interest in women he considered exotic, Rosina Ferrara, Amélie Gautreau and Judith Gautier, was prompted by infatuation that transcended aesthetic appreciation. Sargent scholars accept an affair with Louise Burkhardt, the model for Lady with the Rose.
John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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When John Singer Sargent was only 18 years old, he was accepted at the rigorous L’Ecole des Beaux Arts. In August 1875, Sargent moved out of the family’s home and into a fifth-floor studio apartment at 73 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs with fellow art student James Carroll Beckwith.
Addresses:
73 Rue Notre Dame des Champs, 75006 Paris, France (48.84322, 2.33189)
41 Boulevard Berthier, 75017 Paris, France (48.88744, 2.29916)
Place
The young American artists had found a promising location. The studios at 73 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs had also housed the famous French painter Jean-Paul Laurens, while 75 was the mansion-atelier of Adolphe William Bourguereau. By the 1860s, this small, winding road had already been nicknamed “the royal road of painting.” Sargent, Beckwith and their pals led a young bohemian life in the Left Bank. They worked hard but still had time for wild evenings, moving the easels aside for dancing and drinking right in the studio. Sargent was known for entertaining his guests on a rented piano. On Sunday nights, they would clean themselves up for a proper dinner party at Sargent’s family’s home with “educated and agreeable” conversation. In 1879, Sargent painted the portrait of his art teacher Carolus-Duran, and it absolutely launched his career. It was bold, theatrical, and presented a stunning likeness in both spirit and physicality. Sargent was only 23 years old and already one of the best portrait artists in France. In Diliberto’s novel, Sargent meets the future Madame X at a Montparnasse restaurant. In reality, they may have met when Gautreau attended an informal party at Sargent’s studio on rue de Notre-Dame-des-Champs in 1881. In the meantime, steady commissions enabled Sargent to buy a large, new home and studio on the Right Bank, closer to all of his wealthy patrons. In the winter of 1883-84, Sargent moved to 41 boulevard Berthier, on the shaded side of a wide street whose light made it a popular location for art studios. It wasn’t far from the new mansions near Parc Monceau, and in fact just a few blocks from Madame Gautreau who lived at 80 rue Jouffroy d’Abbans. The studio did have some history to it as it had previously been occupied by Alfred Stevens (Belgian painter in Paris, 1823–1906.) In The Greater Journey, David McCullough describes Sargent’s new Right Bank studio: “A workplace elegantly furnished with comfortably upholstered chairs, Persian rugs, and drapery befitting his new professional standing, and with an upright piano against one wall.” “Portrait of Madame X” was a disaster at the 1884 salon. “Quelle horreur!” said polite Paris society. One critic said the flesh “more resembles the flesh of a dead than a living body.” Sargent left for the summer in London while Gautreau disappeared to Brittany, far from the judgment of Paris. Sargent would keep his Paris studio on boulevard Berthier for two more years, where he proudly displayed Madame X. By March of 1886 he saw the folly of keeping his Berthier studio and gave it up to Giovannie Boldini.
Life
Who: John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)
Before John Singer Sargent’s birth, his father, FitzWilliam, was an eye surgeon at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia 1844–1854. After John’s older sister died at the age of two, his mother, Mary (née Singer), suffered a breakdown, and the couple decided to go abroad to recover. They remained nomadic expatriates for the rest of their lives. Although based in Paris, Sargent’s parents moved regularly with the seasons to the sea and the mountain resorts in France, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland. While Mary was pregnant, they stopped in Florence, Tuscany, because of a cholera epidemic. Sargent was born there in 1856. A year later, his sister Mary was born. After her birth, FitzWilliam reluctantly resigned his post in Philadelphia and accepted his wife’s entreaties to remain abroad. They lived modestly on a small inheritance and savings, living a quiet life with their children. They generally avoided society and other Americans except for friends in the art world. Four more children were born abroad, of whom only two lived past childhood. An attempt of Sargent to study at the Academy of Florence failed as the school was re-organizing at the time, so after returning to Paris from Florence, Sargent began his art studies with Carolus-Duran. The young French portrait artist, who had a meteoric rise, was noted for his bold technique and modern teaching methods, and his influence would be pivotal to Sargent during the period from 1874 to 1878. In 1874, on the first attempt, Sargent passed the rigorous exam required to gain admission to the École des Beaux-Arts, the premier art school in France. He took drawing classes, which included anatomy and perspective, and gained a silver prize. He also spent much time in self-study, drawing in museums and painting in a studio he shared with James Carroll Beckwith. He became both a valuable friend and Sargent’s primary connection with the American artists abroad. Sargent also took some lessons from Léon Bonnat. His most controversial work, “Portrait of Madame X” (Madame Pierre Gautreau) (1884) is now considered one of his best works, and was the artist’s personal favorite; he stated in 1915, "I suppose it is the best thing I have done." when unveiled in Paris at the 1884 Salon, it aroused such a negative reaction that it likely prompted Sargent’s move to London.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John Singer Sargent first took a lease at Tite Street in June 1885 and London would remain his home the rest of his life.
Addresses:
31-33 Tite St, Chelsea, London SW3 4JA, UK (51.48507, -0.15977) [English Heritage Building ID: 424570 (Grade II, 1969)
12-14 The Avenue, Fulham Rd, London, UK (51.49334, -0.16938)
Place
13 Tite Street, later changed to 33 Tite Street, SW3. John Singer Sargent would eventually expand to 31 Tite Street in 1900, combining both by cutting a hole in the wall and he would use 31 as his residence and keep 33 as his studio. John Singer Sargent entered into the lease of 14 Fulham Road, SW10 Studio towards the end of 1895, effectively moving from Morgan Hall where he and Abbey worked together. John Singer Sargent would keep this studio for the next twenty-one years, pretty much over the whole remaining span of his library decoration project. From 1895 on, according to Charteris, Sargent would be working here more than at Tite Street. It served as his hide-away of sorts as he had grown so popular he could rarely get any privacy at Tite Street.
Life
Who: John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)
Prior to the Madame X scandal of 1884, John Singer Sargent had painted exotic beauties such as Rosina Ferrara of Capri, and the Spanish expatriate model Carmela Bertagna, but the earlier pictures had not been intended for broad public reception. Sargent also kept the Madame X painting prominently displayed in his London studio until he sold it to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1916, a few months after Gautreau’s death. Before arriving in England, Sargent began sending paintings for exhibition at the Royal Academy. These included the portraits of “Dr. Pozzi at Home” (1881), a flamboyant essay in red and his first full-length male portrait, and the more traditional “Mrs. Henry White” (1883.) The ensuing portrait commissions encouraged Sargent to complete his move to London in 1886. Notwithstanding the Madame X scandal, he had considered moving to London as early as 1882; he had been urged to do so repeatedly by his new friend, the novelist Henry James. In retrospect his transfer to London may be seen to have been inevitable. Back in London, Sargent was quickly busy again. His working methods were by then well-established, following many of the steps employed by other master portrait painters before him. After securing a commission through negotiations which he carried out, Sargent would visit the client’s home to see where the painting was to hang. He would often review a client’s wardrobe to pick suitable attire. Some portraits were done in the client’s home, but more often in his studio, which was well-stocked with furniture and background materials he chose for proper effect. He usually required eight to ten sittings from his clients, although he would try to capture the face in one sitting. He usually kept up pleasant conversation and sometimes he would take a break and play the piano for his sitter. Sargent seldom used pencil or oil sketches, and instead lay down oil paint directly. Finally, he would select an appropriate frame. Sargent had no assistants; he handled all the tasks, such as preparing his canvases, varnishing the painting, arranging for photography, shipping, and documentation. He commanded about $5,000 per portrait (about $130,000 in current dollars.) Some American clients traveled to London at their own expense to have Sargent paint their portrait.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Russell house would be the center of attention and animation of the Broadway colony of artists. This was actually the second home of the Broadway colony. They moved here in 1886 after having lived for a year at Farnham House, which was almost next door.
Addresses:
Russell House, B4632, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12 7BU, UK (52.03685, -1.86585) [English Heritage Building ID: 400987 (Grade II, 1959)]
Farnham House, Church St, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12, UK (52.03469, -1.86374) [English Heritage Building ID: 399309 (Grade II, 1959)]
Place
Russell House is said to be 1791, with early XIX century additions and late XIX century alterations. Sandstone ashlar with Welsh slate roof. Two storeys with attic. Main part of house of three bays, with storey band. On the ground floor are bowed sash windows of early XIX century type, with glazing bars, fluted pilasters, and cornices. On the first floor are boxed sashes with glazing bars. Attic dormers have segmental heads and sashes with glazing bars To the right is an added bay which has a blocked keyed elliptical archway on the ground floor and a sash with glazing bars above. Within the blocked archway is a door under an iron openwork porch with leaded canopy. Copings and chimneys on gables and between main house and added bay. To the right is a former barn, converted into a drawing room and studio in the late XIX century. Within the blocked elliptical archway is a timber bay window with, curved sides. To each side are four pairs of ventilation slits, with an oval opening above each. A photograph taken in the late 1870s shows the front door in the middle bay of the main part of the house, and the barn before conversion. The house was bought in 1885 by Frank Millet, an American artist who died when the Titanic sank in 1912. Farnham House and former barn is circa 1660, altered in the XIX century. Squared limestone with stone slate roof. Two storeys with attic, three bays. Two moulded drip courses. Windows rebated and chamfered with mullions, of four lights at the left and three lights at the right. The central window on the first floor is of two lights. The attic is lit by 3-light windows with hoods, set within gables which have a rusticated oval below each apex. The door, in the middle bay, has a moulded surround of the XIX century with Tudor arch and a hood with lozenge stops. This replaced a timber doorcase of the XVIII century shown in an old photograph. Coped gables with chimneys. The left-hand chimney has diagonal caps which have friezes carved with lozenges. Adjoining to the right is a former barn, now a restaurant, of one storey with attic. It has three windows with plain reveals, the two left-hand ones with keyed segmental heads. Above is a dormer. The right-hand return wall, facing north, has two timber canted bay windows with glazing bars. Between them is a doorway. The wide doorway, to the right, is now blocked and glazed. Dormer at left. The wall has triangular ventilation holes. At the right a lower part of the building has two timber canted bay windows and another dormer. Between the windows is a doorway with Tudor-arched head.
Life
Who: Francis Davis Millet (November 3, 1848 – April 15, 1912)
Russell House was quite a bit larger than Farnham House and both Edwin Austin Abbey and John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) partnered with the Millets for a seven year lease. For Francis Davis Millet, his wife, sister and kids, it became their family’s permanent residence. For Sargent and Abbey (both bachelors at the time) they deferred to Frank’s wife Lily Millet and his sister Lucia Millet as mistresses of the house. Lily became the informal hostess of the colony and to the Millets came a flock of other guests who would come and go, staying indifferent periods throughout the year either in this house or near at some other lodging. This was Sargent’s home away from home - his second family and he would make it back to Broadway as much as he could for four straight years. Though he had the Tite Street studio in London, he really preferred Broadway during this period. Still, the demands of his art had him traveling often. Millet had a studio in Rome in the early 1870s, and Venice in the mid-1870s, where he lived with Charles Warren Stoddard, a well-known American travel journalist who, evidence indicates, had an active sexual interest in men. Historian Jonathan Ned Katz presents letters from Millet to Stoddard that suggest they had a romantic and intimate affair while living a bohemian life together. A well-regarded American Academic Classicist, Millet was close friends with Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Mark Twain, both of whom were present at his 1879 marriage to Elizabeth ("Lily") Greely Merrill in Paris, France; Twain was his best man. He was also well acquainted with the impressionist artist John Singer Sargent, who often used Millet’s daughter Kate as a model, as well as the esteemed Huxley family. The couple would have three children: Kate, Laurence, and John. Since about 1910, Millet had moved with Archibald Butt, a Captain in the United States Army Quartermaster Corps, in his home in Washington, D.C. They died together during the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Morgan Hall is a large detached house set back from road. Late XVI century (recorded as Bakers in 1590), refaced in XVIII century and enlarged to east.
Address: London Rd, Fairford, Gloucestershire GL7 4AU, UK (51.70796, -1.77278)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 129728 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Rubble stone, faced in roughcast to north west, and in render on late XVIII century wing, with raised alternating quoins, hipped stone slate roof both ranges, large ashlar stacks. Long E-shape range of 2 storeys and attic, with single XVIII century wing on north east end of 2 storeys. West front has 2-light XVIII century casements in moulded stone architraves, to both floors along whole of west side, occasionally with timber lintel and no architrave. Stone doorcase in northernmost arm of E with pilasters, plain frieze, and moulded cornice, and recessed 6-panel door, 4 fielded, lower 2 flush, in 2 leaves, with sundial over. Southernmost arm appears to have been altered or is possibly later. East side of original range has similar casement fenestration, 4 windows, some 3-light, and 3 hipped dormers. XVIII century range on plinth has 4 large 12-pane sashes in moulded architraves matching earlier ones, 3 on ground floor with door in bay 2 from left formed by adding solid piece of wood to lower sash. Internal shutters remain and some panelling in this wing, panelling also intact in ground floor room in north west corner of original range. Interior otherwise inaccessible. Reputed to have been a Cromwellian stronghold during the Civil War.
Life
Who: John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)
In the XIX century, Broadway became home to artists and writers, including Elgar, John Singer Sargent, J.M. Barrie, Vaughan Williams, William Morris, Mary Anderson and American artist and writer, Francis Davis Millet. Edwin Austin Abbey was an American muralist, illustrator, and painter. He worked with John Singer Sargent on the Boston Public Library. The move from Broadway to Morgan Hall for use as a studio (which was only 40 miles south of Broadway) was from the pressuring of Abbey’s newlywed wife ("Mary") Gertrude Mead. They (Abbey and Mary) had met at Broadway when they were staying with the Millet’s at Russel House in 1888, and again in 1889. The following year Edwin and Mary were married in America and when they returned to England, Mary bristled under the notion that they would once again stay with the Millet’s, it wasn’t a serious enough atmosphere. Mary’s idea was to find other accommodations, and Sargent went along since the two artists were working on the same project. Edwin was well liked by all those at Broadway, the Millet’s having been very close to Abbey long time before he ever met Mary. The new Mrs. Abbey, on the other hand, a dominating, ambitious, and frosty personality felt Broadway wasn’t a focused enough environment for two artists taking on such a serious undertaking as the murals at the Boston Public Library. This may have been a fair critique of the little Broadway colony during the summers and the gregarious Millet’s in general, but everyone seemed to understand, without it ever having been said, that Mary couldn’t countenance playing second fiddle to the mistress of the house. Although Broadway and the Millets carried on without Abbey and Sargent, the little wedge forced between them by Edwin’s wife seemed to shatter the fragile Broadway colony’s atmosphere. Life was taking a new turn for most. Those with children found their families growing up, it was time to get serious, and it never again quite equaled (as often happens in life) those years between 1885 and 1889. Though the Millets could understand, they never quite forgave Mary for taking their Edwin away. In 1890 when the Abbeys returned to England as newlyweds, they found a place in Gloucestershire which became their permanent residence. Sargent was still away in the Middle East doing research for his part of the murals and by the time he joined them, two art students from Paris, James Finn and Wilfrid de Glehn were there to assist.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

John Singer Sargent, who died on April 14, 1925, is interred in Brookwood Cemetery (Glades House, Cemetery Pales, Brookwood, Woking GU24 0BL).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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