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Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977)

Richard Stewart Addinsell was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film Dangerous Moonlight.
Born: January 13, 1904, Woburn Square, London, United Kingdom
Died: November 14, 1977, Brighton, United Kingdom
Parents: Annie Beatrice Richards, William Arthur Addinsell
Albums: The Film Music of Richard Addinsell (BBC Philharmonic), more
Education: Royal College of Music
Hertford College, Oxford
Lived: 4 Chichester Terrace, Brighton BN2 1FG, UK (50.81617, -0.11415)
30 Launceston Place, W8
31 Woburn Square, WC1H
1 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3
Buried: Golders Green Crematorium, Golders Green, London Borough of Barnet, Greater London, England

Victor Stiebel was a South African-born British couturier. Richard Addinsell was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film Dangerous Moonlight. Date of when their relationship started is vague, but it is recorded that “on the evening of March 27, 1965, after months of pain, Winnie Ashton rallied from her sickbed sufficiently to tie a purple nylon scarf around her head and to dab on some lipstick. She called for her old friends, Dick Addinsell and designer Victor Stiebel, to come to her home at 1 Draycott Place in Chelsea for a kind of farewell party” Declining health forced Addinsell to retire in 1965. Following the death of Stiebel, in 1976, the frail composer became even more withdrawn. He died little more than one year later, in 1977. In 1999 it was revealed that the royalties for Warsaw Concerto had belonged to the parents of author Jilly Cooper, whose brother advanced the theory that Addinsell - for many years their neighbor - gave it to them as thanks for being discreet about his relationship with Stiebel.
Together from (before) 1965 to 1976: 11 years.
Richard Stewart Addinsell (January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977)
Victor Stiebel (1907- 1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977), composer and pianist, was born at 31 Woburn Square, WC1H the younger of the two sons of William Arthur Addinsell, chartered accountant, and his wife, Annie Beatrice Richards. His adoring mother arranged for him to be educated at home.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977) lived from 1957 to 1961 at 30 Launceston Place, W8.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The first owner of 4 Chichester Terrace was George Ashburner. As with many who subsequently lived in the house he had strong connections with India although he’d been born in Llandaff, Wales in 1810.
Address: 4 Chichester Terrace, Brighton BN2 1FG, UK (50.81617, -0.11415)
Type: Private Property
Place
Previous owners of 4 Chichester Terrace were: George Ashburner: 1848 – 1863, Edward Wigram: 1863 – 1870, Catherine Wigram: 1870 – 1876 and Thomas Cundy III, 1878 – 1885. Richard Addinsell, the witty, urbane and prolific composer of light popular music who wrote an international hit with the Warsaw Concerto, lived in the penthouse of No. 4 Chichester Terrace until his death in 1977. He shared the flat with his partner Victor Stiebel, who was one of the leading coutouriers of the time and a founder member of the Incorporated Society of Fashion Designers.
Life
Who: Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 – November 14, 1977) and Victor Stiebel (1907-1976)
Richard Addinsell had flourished in the pre-war and post-war theatrical era when revue was one of its most popular forms of entertainment and from the mid-twenties, when he wrote the score for “The Charlot Revue of 1926”, Addinsell was one of he most sought after contributors to the genre. He cotributed songs for songs for Noel Coward’s “Sigh No More” and Arthur Macrae’s “Living For Pleasure” and the entire score for Joyce Grenfell Requests the Pleasure” and for all her succeeding one-woman shows. He also wrote the incidental music for many other theatre shows including Emlyn Williams’ “Trespass” and Jean Anouilh’s “Ring Round the Moon”. Addinsell composed many film scores including “Goodbye Mr Chips”, “Beau Brummel”, “Blythe Spirit” and “The Prince and the Show Girl”. But it was his theme music for the film “Dangerous Moonlight” which provided the greatest hit of his career. This was ”The Warsaw Concerto” which was to become a worldwide hit in its own right. Vidtor Stiebel, Addinsell’s partner, was renowned for the restrained elegance of his designs and along with the other leading coutouriers of his time including Edward Molyneux, Norman Hartnell and Hardy Amies did much to establish the British look in the world of international fashion. He also designed for a number of leading English theatre stars including Vivien Leigh and Margaret Leighton and frequently designed the clothes of leading ladies in various stage productions as well as having contracts with such commercial design firms such as Jacqmar. Addinsell and Stiebel enetrtained many glamorous friends in their Chichester Terrace penthouse including Noel Coward, Clemence Dane, Vivien Leigh, Margaret Leighton and Joyce Grenfell.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 4 Cheyne Walk, Mary Ann Cross (née Evans) aka George Eliot (1819–1880), "Novelist died here"
Address: Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5TS, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Cheyne Walk is a historic street, in Chelsea, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Cheyne Walk forms part of the A3212 and A3220 trunk roads; it extends eastwards from the southern end of Finborough Road past the Battersea and Albert Bridges, after which the A3212 becomes the Chelsea Embankment. It marks the boundary of the, now withdrawn, extended London Congestion Charge Zone. East of the Walk is the Chelsea Physic Garden with its cedars. To the West is a collection of residential houseboats which have been in situ since the 1930s. Cheyne Walk takes its name from William Lord Cheyne who owned the manor of Chelsea until 1712. Most of the houses were built in the early XVIII century. Before the construction in the XIX century of the busy Embankment, which now runs in front of it, the houses fronted the River Thames. The most prominent building is Carlyle Mansions.
Notable queer residents of Cheyne Walk:
• At the time of his death, Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 –November 14, 1977), composer, was living at 1 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3.
• George Eliot (1819-1880) spent the last three weeks of her life at 4 Cheney Walk, SW3. Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, acquired it in 2015.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 16 Cheyne Walk, SW3 Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882) and Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837–1909), "Lived here." Dante Gabriel Rossetti was banned from keeping peacocks due to the noise.
• Henry James (1843-1916) spent his last years at 21 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3.
• W. Somerset Maugham stayed at 27 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3 in 1904, the same address of Bram Stoker.
• Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier of Brighton (1907-1989) and Jill Esmond lived at 74 Cheney Walk, SW3 in the 1930s.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 96 Cheyne Walk, SW10 James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) "Painter and ercher lived here." Also Diana Mitford, Lady Mosley (1910-2003) lived at no. 96 with her first husband Bryan Guinness in 1932.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) and Peter Pears (1910-1986) lived at Ursula Nettleship’s house, 104a Cheney Walk, SW10 8 weeks at £1 a week each. Light and heath, £2, telephone £9. Total £27.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.
Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NH, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)
Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.
Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello March 6, 1951 “Till you are home once more”.”
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on July 2, 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noel Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.
Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on March 14, 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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