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Cecil Beaton (January 14, 1904 – January 18, 1980)

Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE was an English fashion, portrait and war photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award–winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre.
Born: January 14, 1904, Hampstead, United Kingdom
Died: January 18, 1980, Broad Chalke, United Kingdom
Awards: Academy Award for Best Costume Design, more
Siblings: Nancy Beaton, Barbara Beaton, Reginald Beaton
Lived: Reddish House, South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Ashcombe House, Cranborne Chase, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Studied: St John's College, Cambridge
Harrow School
St Cyprian's School
Buried: All Saints, South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH

Ashcombe House, also known as Ashcombe Park, is a Georgian manor house, set in 1,134 acres (4.59 km2) of land, on Cranborne Chase, in the parish of Berwick St John, near Salisbury, in Wiltshire. The house is about equidistant between the villages of Berwick St John and Tollard Royal.
Address: Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320267 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
There have been several buildings on the site. The first house was built in 1686 by a local squire, Robert Barber. Only some fifty years later, in 1740, the Barber family entirely demolished the 1686 house and rebuilt on the site. In 1750 Anne Wyndham inherited the house. The next year she married the Hon. James Everard Arundell, third son of the 6th Baron Arundell of Wardour. In 1754 the architect Francis Cartwright largely remodelled the interior of the house for the Arundells. In 1815 the Ashcombe Estate was purchased from Lady Arundell by Thomas Grove the younger of Ferne House for £8,700. Thomas Grove’s grandson Sir Walter demolished most of the 1740 house in around 1870. Sir Walter later sold Ashcombe House to the 13th Duke of Hamilton, who in turn sold Ashcombe to Mr R. W. Borley of Shaftesbury after WWI. The current Ashcombe House was originally part of the much larger mid-XVIII century structure, and is an L-shaped three-bay survival of the eastern wing. There is a five-bay orangery close to the house.
Life
Who: Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE (January 14, 1904 – January 18, 1980)
The photographer and designer Cecil Beaton first visited the house in 1930, taken there by the sculptor Stephen Tomlin together with the writer Edith Olivier. He was later to write of his first impression of the house, as he approached it through the arch of the gatehouse: “None of us uttered a word as we came under the vaulted ceiling and stood before a small, compact house of lilac-coloured brick. We inhaled sensuously the strange, haunting - and rather haunted - atmosphere of the place ... I was almost numbed by my first encounter with the house. It was as if I had been touched on the head by some magic wand.” That same year Mr Borley leased Ashcombe House to Beaton for £50 a year, a very small rent, on the condition that Beaton would make improvements to the house, which was all-but derelict. Beaton employed the Austrian architect Michael Rosenauer to make substantial alterations to the material of the house, including a passageway through the house to unite the front and the back, and elongating the windows. Plumbing and electricity were installed. The artist Rex Whistler designed the Palladian front door surround, with its pineapple made from Bath stone. Urns were positioned on the roof and the orangery was converted into Beaton’s studio. Beaton entertained lavishly at Ashcombe House, and his houseguests included many notable people of the time, including actors and artists such as Tallulah Bankhead, Diana Cooper, Ruth Ford and Lord Berners. Artists Whistler, Salvador Dalí, Christian Bérard and Augustus John and stage designer Oliver Messel painted murals in the house, and Dalí used it as the backdrop of one of his paintings. Little remains of the Beaton-era interior design, although in the "circus room,” which once contained a Whister-designed bed shaped like a carousel, one mural of a lady on a circus horse remains, painted during a hectic weekend party when all guests wielded paintbrushes. Beaton’s lease expired in 1945, and he was heartbroken to be forced to leave the house: his biographer Hugo Vickers has stated that Beaton never got over the loss of Ashcombe. Beaton detailed his life at the house in his book “Ashcombe: The Story of a Fifteen-Year Lease,” first published in 1949 by B. T. Batsford. The dustjacket of the first edition of the book featured a painting by Whistler, with the orangery on the left of the painting (on the back cover) and Ashcombe House itself to the right, on the front cover; this image has been reproduced on the cover of the 1999 publication of the book. In 1948 Beaton designed a fabric, which is still available, which he named "Ashcombe Stripe" after Ashcombe House. Right up until his death in 1980 Beaton owned a late XVIII century painting of the house, thought to have been painted around 1770. It is now held at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum in Salisbury, Wiltshire, bought from a sale of Beaton’s collections held by Christie’s auctioneers. Beaton’s landlord, Hugh Borley, R. W. Borley’s son, lived in the house from 1946 until his death in 1993. He grew increasingly eccentric and resented the fame which Beaton’s book had brought to the house, refusing all offers to sell it and chasing off sight-seers with dogs or threatening them with guns. Shortly before Borley’s death, the house was sold in a private sale, to David and Toni Parkes, who set about restoring the house. They were friends with the director of the Dovecote Press, which republished Beaton’s book on Ashcombe on its fiftieth anniversary in 1999, and so a special launch party was held at the house. When the house came up for sale in 2001, the first time it had been on the open market since just after WWI, there was a great deal of interest. Madonna and Guy Ritchie were the successful purchasers, after they were told by Hugo Vickers, Beaton’s biographer, of its being up for sale.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Society photographer and artist Sir Cecil Beaton bought Reddish house in 1947 and transformed the interior. Beaton added rooms on the eastern side, extended the parlour southwards, and introduced many new fittings. Greta Garbo was a frequent visitor. The upper floor had been equipped for illegal cock-fighting at the beginning of the XX century but Beaton used the cages as wardrobes to store the oscar-winning costumes from his set design of “My Fair Lady.” He remained at the house until his death in 1980 and is buried in the churchyard at All Saints (South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH).
Address: South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320692 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Reddish House, also known as Reddish Manor, in the village of Broad Chalke in Wiltshire, England, is an early XVIII-century manor house possibly built in its current form for Jeremiah Cray, a clothier. Whilst the history of the property can be traced to the early XVI century, the house as it currently stands appears to have been developed in the early XVIII century, when owned by a series of three absentee landlords all sharing the name Jeremiah Clay. The construction and design appear to show a melange of influences of the architectural styles favoured during the reigns of Charles II (1660–1685); William and Mary (1689–1702); and Queen Anne (1702–1714). In the XX century the house was inhabited by Norah Young until 1918, and by Major C.A. Wells until 1929 when it was purchased by R.W. Williamson to amalgamate the 100 acres into the neighbouring Knowle farm. In 1935 Claude Williamson sold the house and its 2.5 acre gardens to Dr. Lucius Wood and his wife Clare who lived there from 1935 until 1947, running his General Practice and dentistry. Their son, the artist Christopher Wood is buried in the village churchyard; his headstone was carved by Eric Gill. In 1980 Ursula Henderson bought the house from the estate of Cecil Beaton and lived there until 1987 when she moved to the neighbouring village of Bishopstone before her death in 1989. She was born Ursula von Pannwitz and was once styled Countess of Chichester from her first marriage to John Pelham, 8th Earl of Chichester who died on active service in 1944. The house was owned and extensively renovated by musicians Robert Fripp and Toyah Willcox from Dec. 1987 until July 1999.
Life
Who: John Christopher Wood (April 7, 1901 – August 21, 1930), aka Kit Wood
Christopher Wood was an English painter born in Knowsley, near Liverpool. At Liverpool University, Wood met Augustus John, who encouraged him to be a painter. The French collector Alphonse Kahn invited him to Paris in 1920. From 1921 he trained as a painter at the Academie Julian in Paris, where he met Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Georges Auric and Diaghilev. Wood was bisexual. In the early summer of 1921, Wood met Antonio de Gandarillas, a Chilean diplomat. Gandarillas, a married homosexual fourteen years older than Wood, lived a glamorous life partly financed by gambling. Their relationship lasted through Wood's life, surviving his affair with Jeanne Bourgoint. In 1927 his plans to elope and marry heiress Meraud Guinness were frustrated by her parents whereupon he required emotional support from Winifred Nicholson. (Meraud went on to marry Alvaro Guevara in 1929.) Wood also had a liaison with a Russian émigrée, Frosca Munster, whom he met in 1928. By 1930, addicted to opium and painting frenetically in preparation for his Wertheim exhibition in London, he suffered paranoia and began carrying a revolver. On August 21 he travelled to meet his mother and sister for lunch at 'The County Hotel' in Salisbury and to show them a selection of his latest paintings. After saying goodbye he jumped under a train at Salisbury railway station, although in deference to his mother's wishes it was reported as an accident.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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