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Jane Welsh Carlyle (July 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)

Jane Welsh Carlyle was the wife of essayist Thomas Carlyle. Their long marriage was close but tempestuous, complicated by other relationships on both sides, though these appear to have been platonic, as their own was believed to have been.
Born: January 14, 1801, Haddington, United Kingdom
Died: April 21, 1866, Haddington, United Kingdom
Spouse: Thomas Carlyle (m. 1826–1866)
Lived: Carlyle’s House, 24 Cheyne Row, Chelsea, London SW3 5HL, UK (51.48427, -0.16994)
Craigenputtock, Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway DG2, UK (55.12019, -3.92846)
Buried: Ecclefechan Churchyard, Ecclefechan, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland

A revealing private homosexual document of the 19th century is the ardent correspondence of popular novelist Geraldine Jewsbury with Jane Welsh Carlyle, which lasted from 1841, shortly after they met, until Mrs. Carlyle's death in 1866. (A selection of these letters from 1841 to 1852 was published in 1892; Jewsbury destroyed all of Mrs. Carlyle's letters to her on her deathbed.) Apparently bisexual (she had similarly passionate correspondences with two men), Jewsbury speaks to Mrs. Carlyle in intense, and knowing, romantic terms--for example, on October 29, 1841, she declares, "I love you, my darling, more than I can express, more than I am conscious of myself. . . . I feel towards you much more like a lover than a female friend!" Jane married essayist Thomas Carlyle but the marriage was often unhappy. Thomas was devoted to Lady Harriet Mary Montagu, eldest daughter of George Montagu, 6th Earl of Sandwich, who was married to Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. When Lady Harriet died, Lord Ashburton married Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, who was Jane’s friend and who subsequently, after her husband’s death in 1864, had an intimate relationship with the sculptor Harriet Hosmer.
They met in 1841 and remained friends until Carlyle’s death in 1866: 25 years.
Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury (August 22, 1812 – September 23, 1880)
Jane Baillie Welsh Carlyle (January 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The XIX century four-storey home of Thomas Carlyle is now a Victorian time capsule of furniture and relics.
Address: 24 Cheyne Row, Chelsea, London SW3 5HL, UK (51.48427, -0.16994)
Type: Museum (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 203648 (Grade II, 1954)
Place
Carlyle’s House, in the district of Chelsea, in central London, was the home acquired by the historian and philosopher Thomas Carlyle and his wife Jane Welsh Carlyle, after having lived at Craigenputtock in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. Jane Welsh Carlyle was a prominent woman of letters, for nearly half a century. The building dates from 1708 and is at No. 24 Cheyne Row (No. 5 at Carlyle’s time); the house is now owned by the National Trust. The house is a typical Georgian terraced house, a modestly comfortable home where the Carlyles lived with one servant and Jane’s dog, Nero. The house was opened to the public in 1895, just fourteen years after Carlyle’s death. It is preserved very much as it was when the Carlyles lived there despite another resident moving in after them with her scores of cats and dogs. It is a good example of a middle class Victorian home due to the efforts of devotees tracking down much of the original furniture owned by the Carlyles. It contains some of the Carlyles’ books (many on permanent loan from the London Library, which was established by Carlyle), pictures and personal possessions, together with collections of portraits by artist such as James Abbott McNeill Whistler and Helen Allingham and memorabilia assembled by their admirers. The house is made up of four floors — a basement which houses the kitchen, the ground floor which was the Carlyles’ parlour, the first floor where the drawing room/library and Jane’s bedroom are found, the second floor which was Thomas’ bedroom and is now the Custodian’s residence, and the attic, which was converted into a study in an attempt to remove Carlyle from the constant noise of the street and neighbours. It has a small walled garden which is preserved much as it was when Thomas and Jane lived there — the fig tree still produces fruit today. Theatre producer Stanford Holme became curator of the house and moved there with his wife, the actress Thea Holme in 1959. She took up writing, beginning with a book about the lives of Thomas and Jane Carlyle at the house, “The Carlyles at Home” (1965.)
Life
Who: Jane Welsh Carlyle, née Jane Baillie Welsh (January 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)
Jane Welsh Carlyle had a long lasting relationship (1840-1866) with fellow writer Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880.) The two women first met when Thomas invited Geraldine to Cheyne Row, where Thomas and Jane lived. Geraldine had written to Thomas prior to the invitation admiring his work and also expressing her religious doubt. Geraldine was going through a depressive time, but she also contacted Thomas in the hopes of entering the literary realm in England. When Geraldine and Jane met, their friendship turned out to be more of a romantic relationship. It is evident both women had feelings for each other, but there is no evidence of them being lesbian lovers. Jane always remained dutiful to her husband and neither had acted upon any romantic feelings. This caused a lot of jealousy between the two women as Jane always remained married to Thomas and Geraldine had lovers of her own. However, they both had passionate feelings towards one another and that passion is expressed in their many letters to one another. When Charlotte Saunders Cushman made England her home for several years, she became friends with Geraldine Jewsbury, who is said to have based a character on Cushman in her 1848 novel “The Half Sisters.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Craigenputtock is the craig/whinstone hill of the puttocks (small hawks.) It is a 800-acre (3.2 km2) upland farming estate in the civil parish of Dunscore in Dumfriesshire, within the District Council Region of Dumfries and Galloway.
Address: Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway DG2, UK (55.12019, -3.92846)
Type: Private Property
Historic Scotland Building ID: 4250 (Grade B, 1971)
Place
Craigenputtock was the property for generations, since ca XVI century of the family Welsh, and eventually that of their heiress, Jane Baillie Welsh Carlyle, descended on the paternal side from Elizabeth, the youngest daughter of John Knox, which the Carlyles made their dwelling-house in 1828. It was once the residence of the well-known writer Thomas Carlyle, who wrote many famous works there. It comprises the principal residence – a two-storey, 4 bedroomed Georgian Country House, 2 cottages and a farmstead, 315 acres (127 ha) of moorland hill rising to 1,000 ft (300 m) above sea level, 350 acres (140 ha) of inbye ground of which 40 acres (16 ha) is arable/ploughable and 135 acres (55 ha) of woodland/forestry. The Carlyles remained at Craigenputtock for seven years (before moving to Carlyle’s House in Cheyne Row, London), where "Sartor Resartus" was written. The property was bequeathed by Thomas Carlyle to the Edinburgh University on his death in 1881. It is now home to the Carter-Campbell family, and managed by the C.C.C. (Carlyle Craigenputtock Circle.)
Life
Who: Jane Welsh Carlyle, née Jane Baillie Welsh (January 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)
Jane Welsh Carlyle was the wife of essayist Thomas Carlyle and has been cited as the reason for his fame and fortune. She was most notable as a letter-writer. Jane had been introduced to Carlyle by her tutor Edward Irving, with whom she came to have a mutual romantic (although not sexually intimate) attraction. The couple married in 1826 and for the first seven years lived on the farm in Scotland; the marriage was often unhappy. Jane was also jealous of a friendship her husband had with Lady Harriet Mary Montagu, eldest daughter of George Montagu, 6th Earl of Sandwich, who was married to Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. When Lady Harriet died, Lord Ashburton married Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, who was Jane’s friend and who, subsequently, after her husband’s death in 1864, had an intimate relationship with the sculptor Harriet Hosmer. Harriet Hosmer was also a lover of Matilda Hays, former companion of Charlotte Saunders Cushman and later partner of Adelaide Anne Procter, poet and philanthropist. Although Adelaide Procter had died 30 years before Hays, the Liverpool Echo obituary stated that she had been "the dear friend of Adelaide Procter, gone before." Jane was buried at Ecclefechan Churchyard (Ecclefechan, Lockerbie, Dumfries and Galloway DG11), alongside her husband.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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